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Posted: 8/9/2004 6:13:17 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/9/2004 9:26:25 PM EST by scrum]
Ex-Pat Canadian hunter (AB, BC), spent last 8 years in PRK (free at last). I lrecently moved to WA and will be hunting here for the first time and hunting season is approaching - but I don't have a clue where good areas are for deer/elk.

I know I missed the draws and now need to pick a general ticket for deer and maybe elk but don't know the zones at all to get my ticket for. Can anyone recommend any of the zones/hunting areas for a public land deer hunt in Western or Central WA? I live in King Cty and would prefer not to drive over 6 hrs to the hunt zone. Don't have a lot of cash for a lease or anything, but..

I am not asking for your favorite deer spots or anything people prefer kept small - just general Zone X, NE of town Y kind of stuff. I just don't want to go out and get a tag for some zone with 4 deer and 400 hunters in it.

Thanks for any advice.

Scrum



Link Posted: 8/12/2004 7:04:35 PM EST
A Deer tag is good statewide.

For Elk you either pick East or West of the Cascades.

West is tough - East is easier but the restrictions and sheer number of hunters make it just as difficult.

A good place for deer is the Vail Tree Farm SW of Yelm. The St. Helens Tree Farm isn't bad either but no vehicle traffic.

Elk - I have no idea. I only see the buggers in the summer - never in November.
Link Posted: 8/13/2004 6:55:40 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/13/2004 6:56:43 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/13/2004 10:00:57 AM EST
Some more information for thought.

It depends on whether you want to hunt whitetails (eastern Wa), mule deer (eastern Wa), or blacktails (western Wa). For elk, Rossevelt elk are on the Olympic peninsula, and they can weigh several hundred pounds more than elk in other parts of the state. And I am told they taste different than elk from the east side. As another example, deer from around farmland in eastern Washington can taste almost like beef, vs. another deer 20 miles away that eats ala natural, and may taste pretty gamey.

I think you may want to go through a series of questions to get to where we can offer much help.
1) do you want to do modern firearms, vs. archery or muzzle-loading?
2) what kind of shape are you in? Some areas are steep, and walking a few miles in that type of area, and then bringing out the animal can be really tough.
3) can you stand to hunt in wet weather, like rain....and more rain....
4) do you want to hunt in fairly wide open terrain, or do you mind hunting in thickly forrested areas?
5) can you stand hunting with hundreds of other hunters within rifle shooting distance?
Link Posted: 8/13/2004 12:00:46 PM EST
The hunting ABSOLUTLY SUCKS on the east side of the state, you really dont want to come out here. All the 206ers, the long drive, forest fires, lots of snow and the game numbers are really down.
Link Posted: 8/13/2004 5:50:18 PM EST

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:
WTF? We got a Scrum... AND a Bigscrum here?

I'm no scrun expert. That said, Its scrum and bigscrun.
Link Posted: 8/14/2004 6:42:13 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 11:00:41 PM EST

Originally Posted By oneshot1kill24-7:
The hunting ABSOLUTLY SUCKS on the east side of the state, you really dont want to come out here. All the 206ers, the long drive, forest fires, lots of snow and the game numbers are really down.




What he said, I will be heading that direction just to turn you guys around before you all waste your time.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 2:11:07 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/18/2004 2:18:08 PM EST by scrum]
Thanks for the advice guys. Hopefully this helps put some venison on the table.

Per some of the questions:

1) do you want to do modern firearms, vs. archery or muzzle-loading? Modern Firearms only (I haven't practiced with my bow in 2 years - maybe next year)

2) what kind of shape are you in? Good (not Olympian, but can definately still hike with a heavy pack on) Some areas are steep, and walking a few miles in that type of area, and then bringing out the animal can be really tough. I am looking into borrowing a horse from a friend to save my back. I grew up on horses, so have hunted with them where possible. I swear my last Elk almost killed me as I dragged the sorry carcass out over 3 trips back to camp.

3) can you stand to hunt in wet weather, like rain....and more rain.... If I minded rain I wouldn't have left So Cal for the Seattle area. I know what you are talking about though and am getting better rain gear for this very purpose. I hunted in BC for several years in rain and snow and muck and ... and it wasn't that bad - I still prefer cold and even wet to overheating. I know, I am weird. My wife, sister, and mom can all agree on that much, everytime.

4) do you want to hunt in fairly wide open terrain, or do you mind hunting in thickly forrested areas? I have hunted everything from long range shots over prairie in Saskatchewan to close timber in the Rockies and BC. Different tactics for different animals. It's nice to get a fat, grain fed deer, but that might be a luxury I miss out on this year.

5) can you stand hunting with hundreds of other hunters within rifle shooting distance? I prefer to avoid other hunters as much as possible. I try to go farther away from civilization than most and hike or ride as far out of the norm as reasonable. I have been in combat situations and at least there know people are actually trying to kill me, not just mistaken or careless, or stupid.
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