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Posted: 6/11/2007 2:38:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/12/2007 10:37:41 AM EDT by Slug-O]
Those 2 nuckleheads went to WY to shoot DAWGS!!!!! OK DAMIT YOU 2..... START POSTING PHOTOS....I KNOW THE TWO OF YOU HAVE PROBABLY KILLED OVER A THOUSAND BY NOW....

LETS SEE SOME KILL SHOTS

SLUG-O
Link Posted: 6/11/2007 4:30:21 PM EDT
NOT A TAG


Mike
Link Posted: 6/11/2007 7:29:57 PM EDT
Tagless even.

David
Link Posted: 6/11/2007 7:42:06 PM EDT
We are in Laramie Wyoming not NM shooting Prarie Dogs. Rifles are single shot Savage LRPV in .223 and .22-250. 20X scopes. Before folks start flaming for shooting these varmints, you should really see the damage that these critters do to the fragile environment. It is uncommonly green this year, but as green as it is, the grasses, sage and other natives plants are actually sparse. This will all be brown in a few weeks. Kinda a pita to type on the laptop so this post is brief.

Here are a few pics

THis is a shot looking out across a dog town, the dogs are 100-500 yards out.



Another pic, the small spec out there is an antelope, antelope are all over the place, more numerous than cows it seems. We've seen badgers, deer, coyotes, jackrabbits as well. The Antelope are tolerant of our presense, they don't run when we're shooting the dogs, they just kinda hang out 500-1000 yards out.



Looking back towards the benches.



Some of the carnage, too many pics too little bandwidth.














Link Posted: 6/11/2007 8:04:13 PM EDT
SWEET!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


SLUG-O
Link Posted: 6/11/2007 8:12:33 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/11/2007 8:28:41 PM EDT
This is SERIOUS fun. Shooting in 10-12 MPH constant winds and 30 MPH frequent gusts is challenging to say the least. I've always wanted to go doggin' and the instant "gratification" of a hit is awesome. With the .223's you can see it all go down in vivid detail. The 22-250's reach out there and buck the wind a bit better though. The hits from my loads running 3700 fps close in are comical. No way can you do this without busting out laughing. These have to be the dumbest things on earth. With the wind and long distances sometimes you will take three or four shots before you get the holdoff just right. They don't even look around to see what's going on.

Anyway, beat after two days in the sun whacking these things. One last fun-filled day to go. Maybe more later...
Link Posted: 6/11/2007 8:38:20 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/12/2007 2:28:52 AM EDT
Armadillos not enough for ya?

jj
Link Posted: 6/12/2007 3:35:38 AM EDT
Sweet. Maybe we can import some for the Botter Shoot. I might have to skip a year going to Texas deer hunting and slay some dogs.
Link Posted: 6/12/2007 3:58:34 AM EDT
Git Some...

So tell us Chuck, Are they good Eatin' ?
Link Posted: 6/12/2007 4:35:53 AM EDT
Nice.
Link Posted: 6/12/2007 5:24:58 AM EDT
Great big globs of greasy grimy gopher guts......


looks like lots o' fun!
Link Posted: 6/12/2007 9:08:53 AM EDT
Was that some good eatin' or what??
Link Posted: 6/12/2007 9:15:24 AM EDT
P. Dawg......................ITS WHATS FOR DINNER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

SLUG-O
Link Posted: 6/12/2007 9:27:11 AM EDT
What with the damn CAPS
Link Posted: 6/12/2007 10:32:37 AM EDT
But how can you shoot innocent little prairie dogs?

easy, you just don't lead them as much.
Link Posted: 6/12/2007 5:05:07 PM EDT
Back in the old days when I lived in Texas, I did a bunch of this kind of shooting, to include Coyotes, and Crows. It is a blast!!! And he's right, you can't help but laugh when fur and feathers go flyin!!!!!!!
Link Posted: 6/12/2007 6:02:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 5oulja:
What with the damn CAPS
His caps are locked and he has no key to unlock it.
Link Posted: 6/12/2007 7:53:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jjrockbush:
Armadillos not enough for ya?

jj


Funny, when I was looking at a number of dogs thru the scope today, I swear some looked alot like armadillos. It started out rainy today but it cleared in about 1.5 hours We smacked a bunch of dogs today. I got several at the 400 yard mark with the .22-250. Lots of carnage, more pics. Got to get some more server space to put them up. One of the guys got a jack rabbit too. There were antelope all over today as well. Got a long drive home, got to try & make St. Louis, MO by tomorrow eve. Been a great trip except for the driving.
Link Posted: 6/13/2007 10:01:14 AM EDT

Originally Posted By burney:
This is SERIOUS fun. Shooting in 10-12 MPH constant winds and 30 MPH frequent gusts is challenging to say the least. I've always wanted to go doggin' and the instant "gratification" of a hit is awesome. With the .223's you can see it all go down in vivid detail. The 22-250's reach out there and buck the wind a bit better though. The hits from my loads running 3700 fps close in are comical. No way can you do this without busting out laughing. These have to be the dumbest things on earth. With the wind and long distances sometimes you will take three or four shots before you get the holdoff just right. They don't even look around to see what's going on.

Anyway, beat after two days in the sun whacking these things. One last fun-filled day to go. Maybe more later...


If you''re getting more than one shot without the dogs ducking back in their hole, consider yourself very lucky, and you've got a very good place to hunt.

This means they haven't been shot at much, and therefore aren't "educated" yet.

I wish I could get multiple shots on the same dog. You really do have a good spot. Congrats.
Link Posted: 6/13/2007 2:14:34 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/13/2007 2:20:00 PM EDT by Miami02TJ]
Sorry I'm one of those that does not see hunting for anything other than food or serious environmental preservation to be fun at all.

I respect life too much to feel that taking any of it to be "fun" ... I also think getting off on seeing the carnage is a sign of a more serious mental problem.

Before someone posts the inevitable "but we are helping the environment/farmer" or "DOGS carry diseases and tics" reply, I would like to state the following:

I don't mind anyone shooting the dogs to help out the environment (if it really needs it). If this was the main purpose for the hunt, then there would be no reason for the pics. You can easily post "I took out 30 Prairie Dogs today to help the environment or local farmer. The pics are the proof, at least to me, the hunt was for the carnage and not for the environment.

WHAT REALLY pisses me off is every time one of these posts comes along and I post my opinion how I get tons of PM's from people who agree with me but are too pussy to publicly post it.

Save the PMs if your too much of a little bitch to post your opinion publicly I will just ignore it.

Now CS223 -- don't hold this too against me, I still want one of those silenced 10/22's from you :)
Link Posted: 6/13/2007 2:38:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Miami02TJ:
Sorry I'm one of those that does not see hunting for anything other than food or serious environmental preservation to be fun at all.

I respect life too much to feel that taking any of it to be "fun" ... I also think getting off on seeing the carnage is a sign of a more serious mental problem.

Before someone posts the inevitable "but we are helping the environment/farmer" or "DOGS carry diseases and tics" reply, I would like to state the following:

I don't mind anyone shooting the dogs to help out the environment (if it really needs it). If this was the main purpose for the hunt, then there would be no reason for the pics. You can easily post "I took out 30 Prairie Dogs today to help the environment or local farmer. The pics are the proof, at least to me, the hunt was for the carnage and not for the environment.

WHAT REALLY pisses me off is every time one of these posts comes along and I post my opinion how I get tons of PM's from people who agree with me but are too pussy to publicly post it.

Save the PMs if your too much of a little bitch to post your opinion publicly I will just ignore it.

Now CS223 -- don't hold this too against me, I still want one of those silenced 10/22's from you :)



<-----------------Tree Hugger Forum is that way.
Link Posted: 6/13/2007 2:41:41 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/13/2007 2:41:55 PM EDT by Miami02TJ]

Originally Posted By chromeluv:
<-----------------Tree Hugger Forum is that way.


Already a member -- so $#^#$ off ...
Link Posted: 6/13/2007 4:44:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By chromeluv:

Originally Posted By Miami02TJ:
Sorry I'm one of those that does not see hunting for anything other than food or serious environmental preservation to be fun at all.

I respect life too much to feel that taking any of it to be "fun" ... I also think getting off on seeing the carnage is a sign of a more serious mental problem.

Before someone posts the inevitable "but we are helping the environment/farmer" or "DOGS carry diseases and tics" reply, I would like to state the following:

I don't mind anyone shooting the dogs to help out the environment (if it really needs it). If this was the main purpose for the hunt, then there would be no reason for the pics. You can easily post "I took out 30 Prairie Dogs today to help the environment or local farmer. The pics are the proof, at least to me, the hunt was for the carnage and not for the environment.

WHAT REALLY pisses me off is every time one of these posts comes along and I post my opinion how I get tons of PM's from people who agree with me but are too pussy to publicly post it.

Save the PMs if your too much of a little bitch to post your opinion publicly I will just ignore it.

Now CS223 -- don't hold this too against me, I still want one of those silenced 10/22's from you :)



<-----------------Tree Hugger Forum is that way.


No... now, I can kinda see his point. I was raised that it's a sin to kill what you (or someone else) don't eat/use. I UNDERSTAND the varmint/nuisance issue. I know what kind of damage they can do. I guess he makes a point with killing with glee...

I dunno... guess I'm kinda on the fence. I know shooting at moving targets makes good fun, but killing for sport/pleasure... I'm no tree hugger, I kill and I eat what I kill.

Just a retrospect.

David
Link Posted: 6/13/2007 5:12:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By chromeluv:

<-----------------Tree Hugger Forum is that way.


Thx for the new title/sig -- I could not figure what to use ...
Link Posted: 6/13/2007 5:12:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By diveriter:

Originally Posted By chromeluv:

Originally Posted By Miami02TJ:
Sorry I'm one of those that does not see hunting for anything other than food or serious environmental preservation to be fun at all.

I respect life too much to feel that taking any of it to be "fun" ... I also think getting off on seeing the carnage is a sign of a more serious mental problem.

Before someone posts the inevitable "but we are helping the environment/farmer" or "DOGS carry diseases and tics" reply, I would like to state the following:

I don't mind anyone shooting the dogs to help out the environment (if it really needs it). If this was the main purpose for the hunt, then there would be no reason for the pics. You can easily post "I took out 30 Prairie Dogs today to help the environment or local farmer. The pics are the proof, at least to me, the hunt was for the carnage and not for the environment.

WHAT REALLY pisses me off is every time one of these posts comes along and I post my opinion how I get tons of PM's from people who agree with me but are too pussy to publicly post it.

Save the PMs if your too much of a little bitch to post your opinion publicly I will just ignore it.

Now CS223 -- don't hold this too against me, I still want one of those silenced 10/22's from you :)



<-----------------Tree Hugger Forum is that way.


No... now, I can kinda see his point. I was raised that it's a sin to kill what you (or someone else) don't eat/use. I UNDERSTAND the varmint/nuisance issue. I know what kind of damage they can do. I guess he makes a point with killing with glee...

I dunno... guess I'm kinda on the fence. I know shooting at moving targets makes good fun, but killing for sport/pleasure... I'm no tree hugger, I kill and I eat what I kill.

Just a retrospect.

David


When I was young I would hunt doves, bunnies and tree rats ( Squirrels). Now that I am older it seems kind of pointless. I found my self out in the yard tonight taking care of an injured dove. I believe that we have to take care of nature and it will take care of us.

To each is own, this is the path that I choose now.
Link Posted: 6/13/2007 5:51:59 PM EDT
Buzzards gotta' eat too. None of that will be wasted; a feast for the other creatures that feed on them.

They're soulless, destructive varmints. Pretty good reactive targets as well.
Link Posted: 6/13/2007 6:18:07 PM EDT
Here are some links with information on Prairie Dogs for those not close minded or fixed with justifying their actions despite the facts.

environmentalchemistry.com/yogi/environmental/200703prairiedogs.html

www.hsus.org/wildlife/hunting/prairie_dog_contest_kills.html

www.hsus.org/wildlife/a_closer_look_at_wildlife/blacktailed_prairie_dog/summit_underscores_continued_threats_to_prairie_dogs.html

www.hsus.org/wildlife/a_closer_look_at_wildlife/blacktailed_prairie_dog/

www.nps.gov/archive/thro/tr_dogs.htm

nationalzoo.si.edu/Animals/NorthAmerica/Facts/fact-pdog.cfm

www.nhptv.org/NatureWorks/blacktailedpraire.htm

www.desertusa.com/dec96/du_pdogs.html

www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wild/species/prairie/

www.nwf.org/nationalwildlife/article.cfm?issueID=34&articleID=327

From reading all of this it is clear to me that (copied from another site - to lazy to re-write what someone else has already done):


Myth #1: Prairie Dogs are Everywhere

Actually, there now exists less than 1% of the prairie dog acreage which existed in the past. The small prairie dog acreage remaining is usually in the form of isolated and fragmented colonies, most of which will be unable to sustain prairie dogs in the long run. Especially alarming is the absence of healthy prairie dog complexes (multiple colonies occurring within close proximity of each other) that used to sustain a myriad of associated species which depend on prairie dogs as prey or for the habitat they create. Plague has now compounded the human threats of poisoning, shooting, and habitat destruction. Prairie dogs are not everywhere; rather, the threats to prairie dogs are everywhere.

Myth #2: Prairie Dogs Multiply Like Rabbits

In reality, prairie dogs have a very low rate of reproduction compared to other animals the same size. They breed only one time per year, and the average litter size is 3-4 pups. Those animals whose reproduction is having the greatest impact on the environment are, of course, humans, not prairie dogs.

Myth #3: Prairie Dogs Spread the Plague

In fact, prairie dogs do not spread the plague, they are too busy dying from it. Prairie dogs lack immunity to plague, and mortality rates exceed 99% of a prairie dog population. Prairie dogs typically die within a few short months after contacting the plague bacterium. Other mammals such as mice, cats, and dogs are plague carriers. Plague in humans is treated easily with standard antibiotics. So it is clear that plague is a much greater threat to prairie dogs than to humans.

Myth #4:Prairie dogs ruin rangeland and hurt cattle.

Actually, prairie dogs and cattle have a relationship that is mutually beneficial. Prairie dogs improve the forage for cattle, and cattle grazing allows prairie dog colonies to expand in midgrass prairie. Both cattle and prairie dogs have demonstrated a preference for grazing together, just as bison and prairie dogs historically preferred each other's company. However, given the extensive ecological damage cattle grazing causes in the American West, cattle are not the best substitute for the environmental benefits of a bison- and prairie dog-grazed Great Plains.

Despite the belief that prairie dogs and cattle compete for forage, three decades of scientific research finds the claims that prairie dogs are destructive to ranching are grossly overstated. Scientific data has repeatedly proved that cattle who graze on prairie dog colonies do not weigh significantly less than cattle who weigh on uncolonized areas In fact, prairie dog burrowing actually aerates the soil and helps it to absorb water. Their waste even fertilizes the soil. Further, by grazing, clipping and maintaining their grasslands, more nutritious and succulent vegetation grows. Elk, bison, and pronghorn, even cattle all benefit. The myth that cattle break legs in prairie dog holes is just that: myth.

Myth #5: No One Will Miss the Prairie Dogs When They're Gone

The fact is, prairie dogs sustain a multitude of wildlife species, several of whom would miss the prairie dogs should they disappear. The black-footed ferret is one of the rarest mammals in the world. The ferret inhabits prairie dog burrows and depends on prairie dogs for over 90% of its dietary needs. The main reason the black-footed ferret is endangered is the war against the prairie dog declared at the turn of the century. The swift fox and ferruginous hawk also depend on prairie dogs for food, and have declined along with prairie dogs. The mountain plover and burrowing owl depend on the habitat prairie dogs create, and they have declined throughout their ranges. There are many others, small mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, plants, and insects, whose world is crumbling as prairie dogs and their towns continue to be destroyed.
Link Posted: 6/13/2007 6:28:29 PM EDT
Psss -- I've killed plenty of birds and squirrels and other animals when I was younger. I just no longer think it was/is right to do unless you plan to eat it (or necessary for conservation).
Link Posted: 6/13/2007 7:05:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Miami02TJ:
Psss -- I've killed plenty of birds and squirrels and other animals when I was younger. I just no longer think it was/is right to do unless you plan to eat it (or necessary for conservation).
I sort of feel the same, but sometimes populations need a lil down sizing to keep diseases way. I killed alot of shit in my life.
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 2:51:26 AM EDT
this isn't the thread to debate the morale values of killing animals. start another damn thread, this thread is for chuck and burney to post pictures of their vacations. STFU already about whether its wrong or not, and save that shit for GD and the newly created tree hugger, green peace forum.
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 7:59:57 AM EDT
Hey..............you left out a "Web Page" dogbegone.com

Slug-O
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 8:24:30 AM EDT
Nice shooting...
Link Posted: 6/14/2007 2:40:10 PM EDT
Mmmmmmmmmmmm... Organ meat
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 7:29:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Miami02TJ:
Psss -- I've killed plenty of birds and squirrels and other animals when I was younger. I just no longer think it was/is right to do unless you plan to eat it (or necessary for conservation).


+1.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 8:14:32 AM EDT
Biologists with PhD after their names manage the populations of prairie dogs and other animals. I trust their judgement and not some preservationist organization. Our guide was well versed in wildlife management, laws and practices. If you want to hear a horror story, Google up the "preservationist org" story regarding deer in Europe.

Where we hunted shot these dogs was on private ranch land, a ranch is measured in square miles not acres. A particular dog town is only shot once per year, they have plenty of time to regenerate. True, they only give birth once a year, but when 100(0)'s dogs give birth to 4-5 pups per year, it doesn't take long to regenerate. True, they are not 'everywhere', close though

There are three management techniques used for prairie dogs by biologists in Wyoming. Varmint hunters, poison and plague. Yes, the Wyoming Game Commission actually introduce Plague infected dogs to control their numbers. Golden eagles, hawks, coyotes & foxes prey on prairie dogs. While foxes & coyotes are considered varmints as well, obviously eagles & hawks are not. Poisoning presents a danger to those animals. The poison used to control dog population was found to have caused thinning of the egg shells in birds similar to the effects of DDT.

If anyone thinks that prairie dogs do anything beneficial other than provide habitat for rattle snakes (rare at our elevation), then you are mistaken. Where we hunted shot was considered high desert. This year was the first time in a long time that it was green. If you can imagine a dried up river bed with gravel and silt that has weeds growing in it, that's what the land under our feet looked like. Sage, sparse grass and other plants. The prairie dogs ravage the grasses leaving little forage around the towns for any other animals like the deer & antelope let alone any cattle. It literally looks like a bombing range. The plant life is so fragile, it takes many years to recover. There isn't even enough water to allow wood to rot. Responsible ranchers spend many dollars and years restoring over grazed & poorly managed lands. Prairie dogs make the job even harder. While a farmer here in Florida wouldn't think twice about running a disk harrow over a field to level it, if you were to do that in Wyoming, the resulting damage could take a 100 years to recover. Here in Florida, we gauge the quality of pasture land by the number of cows per acre, in Wyoming it's the the number of acres per cow. I'd venture to say I saw far more antelope than cattle.

There is no way to totally decimate a dog town by shooting. As I walked thru taking pics, you could hear dogs barking in their burrows under your feet. Poison & plague and elimination of the the food source is the only way to eliminate a dog town. So shooting is actually the most effective way to "manage" the population. When managed or thinned, the likelihood of disease transmitted between the dogs, humans and other animals is greatly reduced. BTW, The prairie dog shit was as plentiful as the rocks. By managing a dog town thru shooting, it keeps the town from growing exponentially and destroying more land and more of the food source.

It is interesting to note that there is a shortage of protein in the food chain. I never saw any buzzards but there are a few birds and seagulls that feast on the carcasses. The prairie dogs themselves are cannibalistic. You would shoot a dog and two more would rush to feast on the carcass of their splattered buddy. It was a common sight which resulted in the demise of a few more dogs with a quick follow up shot. Many dead dogs were drug back into the burrows for a family feast. Pretty sick to see a dog feasting on his family member, tearing away at chunks of flesh seconds after being shot. Kinda like something from a Stephen King movie

You can rest assured that many more cattle, horses, chickens, hogs, turkeys, fish and other animals are killed every day for McDonald's, Burger King, Tyson Foods etc. than the number of prairie dogs that are killed in an entire season by varmint hunters.

If anyone thinks shooting prairie dogs is sick and twisted, then I guess I am It was fun, challenging, I enjoyed every single aspect of it, being outdoors, being able to shoot without fear of what's down range, (other than the antelope which we had to be careful of) watching the antelope, deer, eagles and all the other critters, the sound of the bullet in flight, the 'pop' of the dog as the bullet hits home, the cartoonish sight of splattered dogs flying thru the air. I can't wait to go do it again

Those of you who find it offensive, all I can say is you do your thing, I'll do mine and I won't look down on you for your views & beliefs

Link Posted: 6/15/2007 8:59:44 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/15/2007 9:04:56 AM EDT by diveriter]

Originally Posted By CS223:Biologists with PhD after their names manage the populations of prairie dogs and other animals.<snip> Poisoning presents a danger to those animals. The poison used to control dog population was found to have caused thinning of the egg shells in birds similar to the effects of DDT.


Kinda like something from a Stephen King movie


It was fun, challenging, I enjoyed every single aspect of it, being outdoors, being able to shoot without fear of what's down range, (other than the antelope which we had to be careful of) watching the antelope, deer, eagles and all the other critters, the sound of the bullet in flight, the 'pop' of the dog as the bullet hits home, the cartoonish sight of splattered dogs flying thru the air. I can't wait to go do it again
<snip>


I wondered about that . Poison doesn't just stop @ the intended victim.

I must say that last part did make laugh... Out loud here @ work!

David
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:34:56 PM EDT
CS,

That's an interesting account and all, but what I really want to know is,

Who had the Longest Recorded Kill and How Far was it?

How'd the loads work out. What kind of shot-to-hit ratio did you have at various distances? How close could you get to 'em?

They look to be slightly smaller than a dillo, shorter and thinner. I've never seen one before in person.


Link Posted: 6/15/2007 4:05:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By parshooter:
CS,

That's an interesting account and all, but what I really want to know is,

Who had the Longest Recorded Kill and How Far was it?

How'd the loads work out. What kind of shot-to-hit ratio did you have at various distances? How close could you get to 'em?

They look to be slightly smaller than a dillo, shorter and thinner. I've never seen one before in person.




My longest kills were from 400 yards. Most were in the 100-200 yard range. I don't know what the record range was for the trip, one guy was trying for 900+ yards but it was like artillery, he couldn't see the dog in the scope, he aimed above the horizon and the guide tried to walk him in. I'd guess max was in the 500 yard range.

Hand loads worked great, I don't know what the shot to hit ratio was, I'm guessing %25-%35. I haven't counted up my spent rounds yet, I had plenty of left over ammo.

One factor that really made it difficult was the wind. It was 10mph constant gusting up to 30mph. For someone with little experience with long range shooting a small caliber, it was difficult to learn windage. At one point I had to hold off 24 inches to get a kill. 3-12 inches hold off wasn't uncommon. By the third day I was getting the hang of things, it's by no means a kill for every shot. It definately took alot of skill.

P-dogs are waaaaay smaller than I thought! The largest were about the size of a fox squirrel minus the tail and as fat as a navel orange about like a 20oz bottle of soda. The average size was about like a 16oz beer can. They look bigger in the scope. Dillos are like elephants in comparison.

I killed 3 with the Glock 19, Burney killed 1 with his S&W .357 snubbie. Literally anywhere from point blank range to miles out. The guide obviously wouldn't put us right on top of them, usually we set up 100 yards away from the edge of the dog town. 100 yard dogs were easy targets and presented no challenge. 200 yard dogs required you to be settled down and concentrated. Beyond 200 yards required a good judge of windage and elevation especially for the .223 round. The 22-250 had a little less drop and drift but not by much.

For those that need to know, Burney & I were both shooting Savage Long Range Precision Varminter (LRPV) rifles. These are bolt action single shot rifles that have the ejection port on the left side of the receiver. Just in case you mistakenly thought we might be dumping Beta mags thru an M16. A scoped AR15 with a varmint barrel upper and a very good trigger would make a good P-dog gun. Any rapid fire would be a waste of ammo, you have to concentrate for every shot. If you don't see the impact of your round in your scope, then your shooting technique needs work.

Savage LRPV
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 5:34:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/15/2007 5:34:48 PM EDT by diveriter]

Originally Posted By CS223:
<snip>
For those that need to know, Burney & I were both shooting Savage Long Range Precision Varminter (LRPV) rifles. These are bolt action single shot rifles that have the ejection port on the left side of the receiver. Just in case you mistakenly thought we might be dumping Beta mags thru an M16. A scoped AR15 with a varmint barrel upper and a very good trigger would make a good P-dog gun. Any rapid fire would be a waste of ammo, you have to concentrate for every shot. If you don't see the impact of your round in your scope, then your shooting technique needs work.
<snip>


I can't believe between the 2 of ya, neither of ya have a varminter upper for your ARs?!?! What grain .223 were you all shooting 2-400 yards?

David
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 5:57:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By diveriter:

Originally Posted By CS223:
<snip>
For those that need to know, Burney & I were both shooting Savage Long Range Precision Varminter (LRPV) rifles. These are bolt action single shot rifles that have the ejection port on the left side of the receiver. Just in case you mistakenly thought we might be dumping Beta mags thru an M16. A scoped AR15 with a varmint barrel upper and a very good trigger would make a good P-dog gun. Any rapid fire would be a waste of ammo, you have to concentrate for every shot. If you don't see the impact of your round in your scope, then your shooting technique needs work.
<snip>


I can't believe between the 2 of ya, neither of ya have a varminter upper for your ARs?!?! What grain .223 were you all shooting 2-400 yards?

David


Shooting 50gr from the .223 and 55gr from the 22-250. Sierra Varminter projos. Bolt guns were better suited for the longer ranges.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 6:40:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CS223:

Originally Posted By parshooter:
CS,

That's an interesting account and all, but what I really want to know is,

Who had the Longest Recorded Kill and How Far was it?

How'd the loads work out. What kind of shot-to-hit ratio did you have at various distances? How close could you get to 'em?

They look to be slightly smaller than a dillo, shorter and thinner. I've never seen one before in person.




My longest kills were from 400 yards. Most were in the 100-200 yard range. I don't know what the record range was for the trip, one guy was trying for 900+ yards but it was like artillery, he couldn't see the dog in the scope, he aimed above the horizon and the guide tried to walk him in. I'd guess max was in the 500 yard range.

Hand loads worked great, I don't know what the shot to hit ratio was, I'm guessing %25-%35. I haven't counted up my spent rounds yet, I had plenty of left over ammo.

One factor that really made it difficult was the wind. It was 10mph constant gusting up to 30mph. For someone with little experience with long range shooting a small caliber, it was difficult to learn windage. At one point I had to hold off 24 inches to get a kill. 3-12 inches hold off wasn't uncommon. By the third day I was getting the hang of things, it's by no means a kill for every shot. It definately took alot of skill.

P-dogs are waaaaay smaller than I thought! The largest were about the size of a fox squirrel minus the tail and as fat as a navel orange about like a 20oz bottle of soda. The average size was about like a 16oz beer can. They look bigger in the scope. Dillos are like elephants in comparison.

I killed 3 with the Glock 19, Burney killed 1 with his S&W .357 snubbie. Literally anywhere from point blank range to miles out. The guide obviously wouldn't put us right on top of them, usually we set up 100 yards away from the edge of the dog town. 100 yard dogs were easy targets and presented no challenge. 200 yard dogs required you to be settled down and concentrated. Beyond 200 yards required a good judge of windage and elevation especially for the .223 round. The 22-250 had a little less drop and drift but not by much.

For those that need to know, Burney & I were both shooting Savage Long Range Precision Varminter (LRPV) rifles. These are bolt action single shot rifles that have the ejection port on the left side of the receiver. Just in case you mistakenly thought we might be dumping Beta mags thru an M16. A scoped AR15 with a varmint barrel upper and a very good trigger would make a good P-dog gun. Any rapid fire would be a waste of ammo, you have to concentrate for every shot. If you don't see the impact of your round in your scope, then your shooting technique needs work.

Savage LRPV


You guys should be shoo-ins for Sluggo's 600 Yd competition scheduled for the Botter Shoot next month with all that practice.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 6:56:32 PM EDT
Its spelled............Slug-O
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 8:34:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Slug-O:
Its spelled............Slug-O


You preach it son!
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