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Posted: 2/26/2007 8:25:22 AM EST
Hey All,

The Brew Pub came up in conversation the other night. nucstl1 mentioned we could get together and brew beer, some time later drink it. What is the story with the Brew Pub and brewing your own beer? Just curious, sounds like fun. Assemble your own gun, assemble your own beer, kind of goes together. or maybe my brain is still floating after this weekend.

Scott
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 8:38:58 AM EST
The place on the riverfront, I think it's Rhodell's, it pretty cool. You basically assemble, brew the beer, then come back in like 4-6 weeks and bottle it. My BIL does this frequently, and I have done it a couple of times. Maybe we could come up with a Black Rifle Disease IPA, then have another get together to drink some of it. I think the cost is like $130 for a batch, which is equivelent to a keg. I used to get it cased in bottles, take it home and throw it in the fridge, but I have always wanted to get a keg of my own brew and keep it on tap. I would be down for it, but we would need to call the place, get all the details, then setup a reservation.
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 10:39:12 AM EST
Put me in for this one. I have heard about this place, and I like beer.

Lets get r' done.
Bob
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 11:15:50 AM EST

Originally Posted By nucstl1:
The place on the riverfront, I think it's Rhodell's, it pretty cool. You basically assemble, brew the beer, then come back in like 4-6 weeks and bottle it. My BIL does this frequently, and I have done it a couple of times. Maybe we could come up with a Black Rifle Disease IPA, then have another get together to drink some of it. I think the cost is like $130 for a batch, which is equivelent to a keg. I used to get it cased in bottles, take it home and throw it in the fridge, but I have always wanted to get a keg of my own brew and keep it on tap. I would be down for it, but we would need to call the place, get all the details, then setup a reservation.



Does it turn out good? Any home brewed beer I have ever had was so awful if bordered on undrinkable
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 11:35:29 AM EST
I think it would be a lot cheaper to buy the kit at Friar Tuck's and do it yourself, a friend of mine did it for a whole lot less than that much money.
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 11:37:41 AM EST

Does it turn out good? Any home brewed beer I have ever had was so awful if bordered on undrinkable


This not really home brew, as you do all the mixing and brewing in a real brew pub. I guess you could screw it up if you put too much of any one ingredient into the batch. From memory, the guys walking you through the process are pretty experienced and can give advise as to what will determine the taste of the final product.

I think they also do lables, so when it comes time, we will need to have a contest for our Brew lables. I would be in for a keg, and maybe we can chip in on a batch of bottles so everyone has something to take with them.

John
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 11:53:49 AM EST
I was quite an avid homebrewer for many years and had a success of prolly 90%. That is to say one five gallon batch in ten was a clinker. We would brew up five or six five gallon batches of different beer types around Christmas time and that brew would last us till summer time. Then the late summer / early fall brew time would come around to find us drinkig cases of Samuel Adams lager so we could save the SA brown bottles to refill...

Good times!

I happen to have some recipies right here on my desk:

Nuco Cereza Stout (best made when the feds are asleep ;-)
Bring to boil:
1.5 gal water
1/5# crystal malt
.5# bag black patent malt
Pull the bag of black patent out of the boil kettle before it comes to boil, let it drain on the side of the tank. Do not let the kettle come to boil until you:

Add:
4# Mountmellick Stout Malt Extact
2# dried dark malt extract
2/3 tablespoon gypsum

Boil 40 minutes

Add:
1/3 oz Bullion leaf hops

Boil 20 minutes.

Add:
1/3 oz fuggles leaf hops

Boil five minutes.

Remove from heat and add:
10# frozen cherries. (Michigan cherry juice concentrate may be added instead)

Steep 20 minutes.

Chill to 68 degrees, pitch 2 packages of Red Star Ale Yeast (This may no longer be available, use a good ale yeast.)

Primary ferment about 6 days, rack to second carboy, ferment for 27 days. Rack and bottle after adding 1/2 cup corn sugar primer.

This beer is very cherry, very roasty, very strong (6.2% avg) that gets better and more like a barley wine as it ages.


My personal favorite.

efxguy
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 2:48:20 PM EST
My Calculus teacher and I are friends off campus, and he does this brewing - and he brought me 4 different kinds of beer that he brewed. 3 were just amazing, but one was a very bitter, hoppy, IPA - and I don't like IPA's.

Whenever my father and I go on vacation, or just anywhere "not local" - we try to find micro brewerys and look for bottled beer that we can't buy at home, and we go nuts on stocking up. We were in Wisconsin at a car show and found some beer by the Tyranena Brewing Co. We picked up some Rocky's Revenge, Oktoberfest, and others. Upon leaving the store, I spotted a beer that I just couldn't resist. Eye level on the shelf was a beer called "Bitter Woman." I have met bitter women, I've dated bitter women, I've tasted bitter women, but I've never drank a bitter woman. We picked up a 6 pack and took it home. Watching a Nascar race on the following Sunday left us a little parched, so I grabbed a beer for each of us. We cracked them about the same time, and took a drink. The look of horror that enveloped my fathers face only left me with a grim idea on what my face was doing.

That was the worst beer I have EVER tasted. It was a mix of piss and 2 week old dead skunk ass.

Bob
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 4:28:06 PM EST

Originally Posted By efxguy:
I was quite an avid homebrewer for many years and had a success of prolly 90%. That is to say one five gallon batch in ten was a clinker. We would brew up five or six five gallon batches of different beer types around Christmas time and that brew would last us till summer time. Then the late summer / early fall brew time would come around to find us drinkig cases of Samuel Adams lager so we could save the SA brown bottles to refill...

Good times!

I happen to have some recipies right here on my desk:

Nuco Cereza Stout (best made when the feds are asleep ;-)
Bring to boil:
1.5 gal water
1/5# crystal malt
.5# bag black patent malt
Pull the bag of black patent out of the boil kettle before it comes to boil, let it drain on the side of the tank. Do not let the kettle come to boil until you:

Add:
4# Mountmellick Stout Malt Extact
2# dried dark malt extract
2/3 tablespoon gypsum

Boil 40 minutes

Add:
1/3 oz Bullion leaf hops

Boil 20 minutes.

Add:
1/3 oz fuggles leaf hops

Boil five minutes.

Remove from heat and add:
10# frozen cherries. (Michigan cherry juice concentrate may be added instead)

Steep 20 minutes.

Chill to 68 degrees, pitch 2 packages of Red Star Ale Yeast (This may no longer be available, use a good ale yeast.)

Primary ferment about 6 days, rack to second carboy, ferment for 27 days. Rack and bottle after adding 1/2 cup corn sugar primer.

This beer is very cherry, very roasty, very strong (6.2% avg) that gets better and more like a barley wine as it ages.


My personal favorite.

efxguy



Is it true you have to sterilize the bottles before you fill them or it will ruin the batch? Thought I heard that somewhere.
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 4:29:25 PM EST

Originally Posted By patriot73:
Is it true you have to sterilize the bottles before you fill them or it will ruin the batch? Thought I heard that somewhere.


Yea I heard that too, you can just put them in the dishwasher right?
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 5:12:25 PM EST
[Last Edit: 2/26/2007 5:15:02 PM EST by Miller_Custom_1911]

Originally Posted By Kalahnikid:

Originally Posted By patriot73:
Is it true you have to sterilize the bottles before you fill them or it will ruin the batch? Thought I heard that somewhere.


Yea I heard that too, you can just put them in the dishwasher right?


Ummmmmm, no.

You have to steam clean/boil them. They have to be heated with distilled water. It's like canning tomatoes. Any bacteria growth when bottled will result in a petri dish instead of a tasty beverage container. If the Alcohol content was 20 or 25 proof (I believe), the alcohol content is too great for bacteria to grow and reproduce in. That's why you have to distill spirits to achive higher alcohol content. The Alcohol kills the yeast and bacteria. Also, I don't think you are going to find the shelf life to be that of contemporary brews. You can keep them cold, and prolong the life, but they will start to go bad with time. I'm following in the footsteps of my Dad. He leaves beer in the garage where it is cool, not ice cold. It brings out the flavor and fullness of the beer brew. Don't get me wrong, I like a bottle right from the bottom of the cooler too, but I can appreciate the traditional, German approach...my name is Miller after all.

Bob
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 5:20:28 PM EST
I always just used a chlorine bleach and water solution on my bottles followed by a thorough rinse.There are bottle sanitizing agents available at home brew supply stores. Never had a problem. Now overprime the bottles or bottle a tad too early? Pow! Exploding bottles.Only did that once. The boiling wort makes the whole house smell like a brewery. The Mrs. wasn't the happiest.
Link Posted: 2/27/2007 3:10:19 AM EST

Originally Posted By jackinil:
I always just used a chlorine bleach and water solution on my bottles followed by a thorough rinse.There are bottle sanitizing agents available at home brew supply stores. Never had a problem. Now overprime the bottles or bottle a tad too early? Pow! Exploding bottles.Only did that once. The boiling wort makes the whole house smell like a brewery. The Mrs. wasn't the happiest.



The Mrs. thinks that is one of the best parts of home brewing, the malty smell of wort. Though we did eventually move the operations out of doors.

We would always run out hand wash the bottles, then run them though the dishwashing machine, then dunk then into a sanitizing solution then put them on a bottle rack to air dry, then fill and cap.

And yes, as homebrew is not pasturized, it has a shorter shelf life than a commercial beer. Once conditioned, it goes into the fridge to keep. You can filter the beer after fementation and keg it and use a carbonator to get the fizz.... but it is not so traditional.

efxguy
Link Posted: 2/27/2007 3:18:26 AM EST
I guess I hijacked this thread. My apologies.

I guess my point is: Homebrewing can make a good beer, and these DIY brewpubs can help you make an excellent beer. You don't need to invest in equipment to give it a try.


And making our own home town BRD Beer sounds like a fun project!


efxguy

Link Posted: 2/27/2007 2:18:07 PM EST

Originally Posted By nucstl1:

Does it turn out good? Any home brewed beer I have ever had was so awful if bordered on undrinkable


This not really home brew, as you do all the mixing and brewing in a real brew pub. I guess you could screw it up if you put too much of any one ingredient into the batch. From memory, the guys walking you through the process are pretty experienced and can give advise as to what will determine the taste of the final product.

I think they also do lables, so when it comes time, we will need to have a contest for our Brew lables. I would be in for a keg, and maybe we can chip in on a batch of bottles so everyone has something to take with them.

John


John, in regards to your post in the other thread about doing a BBQ at your place...we should all get together and do this brew (keg or bottles), and then enjoy the brew at the BBQ this spring or summer when the weather would allow this.

I'd be up for contributing to the cost and such.

Sorry I didn't make it to Richards, I was frozen in, and with a Mustang for my daily driver, I wasn't chancing my butt with all the weather though I did hear Peoria wasn't too bad. Geneseo got hammered.

I'd still be up for a beer at Gormans sometime if you want.
Bob
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