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Posted: 12/2/2007 10:58:52 AM EDT
I'm working a trade with one of my customers that includes a Taurus 24/7 Stainless long slide in .40SW. Any one else have one? Curious to see what people think, it looks like a nice gun.
Link Posted: 12/2/2007 7:37:02 PM EDT
I have a 24/7 Pro in .40 S&W. It is blued and is not a long slide. Great feel to the grip and a lot of fun to shoot. I have put several hundred rounds through it with no failures.
Link Posted: 12/2/2007 8:35:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/2/2007 8:36:07 PM EDT by Q-Man]
Here's a review I wrote for the one I recently purchased in .45 ACP (a real caliber )


I got a Stainless Taurus 24/7 Pro in .45 ACP at Kieth's table at the last Gun Show. With the background check, the total came to $399. I decided to buy it because of the hubbub about the OSS version, which isn't out yet, tickled my intrest, and, for that low price, if I didn't like it, I wouldn't be out $700+ like I would be for a 1911. Plus, I hadn't bought any toys in a while.

It shoots OK. The accuracy isn't as good as my Kimbers. The grip angle makes it point about like a 1911, which was a big factor for me. The trigger is better than I remember the Glock's trigger being, but not quite as good as my 1911s. the trigger reminds me of a two-stage rifle trigger -- there's a lot of take up, then a fairly crisp break, but not as crisp as my 1911s. I think the plastic parts are what add a bit of a spongy feel to the trigger. (Glocks really seem to be bad with spongy triggers.)

The trigger's first stage take-up deactivates the firing-pin block. The manual safety lever blocks the trigger, having the secondary effect of also blocking the firing pin. If you're not familiar with the action of the 24/7, but it is a double action pistol with a striker (like a Glock) instead of a hammer (like a Sig). Unlike a Sig, there is no de-cocker. Instead there is a safety that's in the same place as the safety on the 1911 and moves in the same directions for "on" and "off". However, it's not a thumb-ride safety like the 1911, which I miss. Because you can't de-cock it, you have to carry it cocked and locked, like the 1911, or with no round in the chamber. The only purpose the double action serves is to give you a second chance at striking a primer that failed to ignite.

Interestingly enough, in my first session of shooting I had with the pistol, I encountered 2 rounds who's primers failed to ignite. (This is a little disconcerting for this gun, because I've never had this happen before with my reloads and my 1911s.) The first time it happened, I tried pulling the trigger again, and still no ignition. After several more strikes, nothing. I dropped the mag, took the round out of the chamber, and re-chambered the round with a different rotation, hoping that the firing pin would strike the primer in a different spot and get it to fire. My idea worked. The round fired after that. (The primer strikes do seem to be pretty close to the center, though.)

For the second failure to ignite, the round also failed to ignite after pulling the trigger repeatedly. This time, I pulled out the round and put it in my 1911. My trusty Kimber touched it off without incident.

This made me wonder if the firing-pin/striker mechanism is a little too weak.

I shot it again a week or two later and had about 3 or 4 more failures to fire, exactly like last time. I'm sure it's not my ammo. After this range session, I went home and, out of curiosity, took the striker/firing-pin out of the slide while cleaning it. I found some fouling on the firing pin and in the firing pin cavity that appeared to be flakes of brass. My theory is that, because this is a new gun, there may be sharp edges around the machining of the slide or firing pin that scrapped off material from the brass cases or primers, and then, as the firing pin retracted to cock the firing pin, the flakes of brass got sucked into the firing pin cavity through the firing pin hole. Perhaps I'm wrong, though, and this material was from poor work at the factory.

I haven't had a chance to fire the gun since I've cleared out the gunk. I'm anxious to see if I've fixed the problem, but until I get a lot more reliability from this pistol, it's going to be exclusively a range toy.

In some of their documentation and advertising, Taurus claims that, if a primer fails to ignite, the double action mechanism "provides a life-saving second try at firing a faulty cartridge". My experience was that if the round fails to fire, hitting the primer in the same spot again and again and again isn't going to help. You're better off racking the slide and taking your second chance with a new round of ammo, just like most other pistols. This makes the double action feature pretty much useless... but I don't like double action anyway, so it's no big loss for me.

Over all, I like the gun, but I'm a little dishartened. The price makes for a great value. The grip is about the same size around as a single stack 1911, yet it packs 12-rounds (50% more than a 8-round single stack 1911). The grip angle is great. The trigger is about as good as I can expect for combat-Tupperware. The accuracy is ok for the price. If it wasn't for the failures-to-fire, I wouldn't have any complaints. Well, maybe just one. I'm used to the thumb-ride safety on my 1911s and it feels a little strange shooting the 24/7 because I don't exactly know what to do with my thumbs. (When I shoot Sigs, I always accidentally put my thumbs on the slide catch/release and then the slide always fails to lock back on the last round.) Another thing to like about the gun is the low weight; however, you do feel more recoil though because of it.

When it comes to shooting my dueling tree, my 1911s win hands down. I can shoot them faster and more accurately. Supposedly some guys have set records shooting the 24/7, but, so far, it's been hard for me to switch. The 1911 just feels right when it's in my hand. It may only have 8 rounds, but those 8 rounds hit. When I shoot the 24/7, the high capacity is needed because I miss. Maybe it's not fair to compare a $400 gun with a $900 gun.

The Taurus 24/7 OSS is the version of the 24/7 Pro that Taurus enhanced for the Army's new pistol program (which is now scrapped). The 24/7 OSS is not out yet, but I think it would be worth waiting for it. In addition to being an inch longer, the OSS adds a safety lever to the right-side of the gun for left-handed shooting. It also adds a de-cocking capability by pressing the safety lever way-up (down for fire, up for safe, and way up for de-cock). I like this idea, because, as my encounters with failures-to-fire demonstrated, the double action trigger on the 24/7 Pro is pretty much useless. A de-cocker will allow the gun to be carried with the chamber loaded and the striker de-cocked, which for many people is an attractive option. I, however, prefer cocked and locked.

I'm going to continue putting more rounds through my 24/7 Pro and see if I have any more problems with failures-to-fire. It certainly burns through the ammo in a hurry with the 12-round mags.
Link Posted: 12/2/2007 9:10:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Q-Man:
Here's a review I wrote for the one I recently purchased in .45 ACP (a real caliber )



I already have a .45, but its too much for concealed carry(too bulky) and the 24/7 is a 15 round. I So far as I've seen, this ones a solid shooter, but good to hear what others have seen.
Link Posted: 12/2/2007 9:17:24 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/2/2007 9:21:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By philoparts:
I already have a .45, but its too much for concealed carry(too bulky) ....


I frequently carry a full-size 1911. I'm a skinny guy and with a Milt Sparks in-the-waist-band holster, it conceals great. The 1911 is a thin gun. The length of the barrel doesn't matter so much because it's inside the pants. (hmmm.... no jokes ).
Link Posted: 12/2/2007 9:35:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Q-Man:

Originally Posted By philoparts:
I already have a .45, but its too much for concealed carry(too bulky) ....


I frequently carry a full-size 1911. I'm a skinny guy and with a Milt Sparks in-the-waist-band holster, it conceals great. The 1911 is a thin gun. The length of the barrel doesn't matter so much because it's inside the pants. (hmmm.... no jokes ).


Yeah, 1911 is slim line gun, but a P90 ain't, hehe....its a frickin slab, built like a tank. Its my workhorse, hardly ever had a failure in the 12 years I've had it, with thousands and thousands of rounds through it.
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