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Posted: 6/17/2014 10:05:39 AM EST
I'm looking for info on how life is up there? I'm thinking about going up there with Schlumberger fracking or coil tubing.
Link Posted: 6/17/2014 10:23:51 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/17/2014 10:25:28 AM EST by FreezinSig]
Life is great!

The camps up there are top notch. Great dining facilities, gyms, rec rooms and activities to do..indoors. I've known plenty of folks who handle man camps better than home life, and some then folks that just can't stand it up there. My job is setting up even small remote camps with soft sided structures, so anything that is framed feels like the Taj to me. Wifi speeds are hit and miss, and roommates are too. You can't really "get away" so get used to seeing the same faces 16 hours a day. Depending on the company, schedules range from 2-6 weeks on. New guys gets stuck with shit rotations so prepare for a month on at least to be on the safe side. Just go up there, mind your P's and Q's and make your money.

If you are going to be in Prudhoe Bay proper, then you will have some places to go, but nothing much to do in your off time.
Link Posted: 6/17/2014 9:42:15 PM EST
Ever work a camp job before?

I'm not sure how many companies do it, but choose your companies carefully. In many instances, folks get a job with, say, a catering company to get face time on the slope with piss poor wages with McDonald's type schedules and management (cough, ESS, cough), and find out later the main company won't hire from subcontractors.

Those serious money jobs are VERY hard to get. It helps you have to know someone on the inside to stand a chance at a career job with BP, Conoco, or Alyeska.

If I could do it over again, I would have gone into oil. Who knew? When crunch time and $10/bbl oil hit, petroleum engineers were flipping burgers, so I thought I made a wise choice in a field to work. Hell, if I could do it over, I'd be a dentist.
Link Posted: 6/17/2014 10:04:34 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/17/2014 10:07:59 PM EST by raven]
If you work for Schulmberger in Deadhorse on Spine Road, my dad designed and built all the facilities up there, both the shops and the camp. It's a nice camp (on the inside).





Link Posted: 6/18/2014 7:38:27 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Elwood_Blues:
Ever work a camp job before?

I'm not sure how many companies do it, but choose your companies carefully. In many instances, folks get a job with, say, a catering company to get face time on the slope with piss poor wages with McDonald's type schedules and management (cough, ESS, cough), and find out later the main company won't hire from subcontractors.

Those serious money jobs are VERY hard to get. It helps you have to know someone on the inside to stand a chance at a career job with BP, Conoco, or Alyeska.

If I could do it over again, I would have gone into oil. Who knew? When crunch time and $10/bbl oil hit, petroleum engineers were flipping burgers, so I thought I made a wise choice in a field to work. Hell, if I could do it over, I'd be a dentist.
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Yea, fuck ESS... If you get a camp with Doyon staff, you will be eating great.
Link Posted: 6/18/2014 10:46:02 PM EST
Too good in some cases. I put on 15 pounds in 30 days at one camp. It was a TDY camp for contractors. The food was ridiculous and available almost all the time. Take advantage of the exercise facilities! And then there are the movie nights.

I worked a radar tower at Oliktok (end of spine road next to Oliktok Dock) for 7 years. We used to visit the camps on holidays for the awesome meals and social gatherings. What was cool about working for the feds on fed land is that unlike other workers in the oil fields, we are allowed to have alcohol, guns, and even smoke inside a federal building. We could hunt as long as we were on our property. I used to drive into the fields from Deadhorse with cases of beer and gun cases in the truck, nothing they could do about it, couldn't even inspect our vehicle unless we allowed it.

In the old days, ITT ran the radar stations on the slope (DEW LINE) and they had their own liquor licenses which they gave up when the Alaska Radar System absorbed those stations. Security guards tell me how in the old days they would escort pallets of booze to the USAF radar station. Parties were legendary and you had to be invited to the station to drink. Even today people will take a scheduled break and instead of going home, they stay in the field and hunt (on our land sometimes).

Some camps are better than others. We didn't belong to the oil field so we would visit camps all over the place, raid the spike rooms (24 cold food and snacks). No one questioned us because once you are in the oil field, everyone is considered a worker and people can cross camps for chow though I don't know if that's a practice.

If you would like to check out the Haul Road, save your vehicle some wear. Get with Veco or somebody who needs rental trucks driven back to Prudhoe Bay. You can drive it up from Fairbanks for free. It's cheaper for them to have you drive it up than pay to stick it on a low boy and have it hauled back.

There's not much to see when you look around. Pictures of ANWR are exaggerated and only show highlights of very small areas. It's mostly ugly scrub brush, no trees, and watch out for brown and white bears. You can hunt from the Haul Road as long as you are 5 miles away from it.
Link Posted: 6/20/2014 12:34:45 AM EST
I have done a shit ton of it. The camps have really improved.

I just got back from Udelhovens Kodiak camp at Kuparuk, damn, that one is great! My own room, and I got there on prime rib night!
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