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9/16/2019 10:09:13 PM
Posted: 1/5/2012 3:47:41 PM EDT
Everyday now on our local news channels (Houston), shootings, robberies, and home invasions.
Such that my wife has taken notice and has been asking where I have been keeping our pistols.
She always sets the alarm when she is home alone. I understand the reality that there are criminals who commit these acts regularly.

We have small children in the home at times. I know we can and will teach our grand children firearm safety.
My wife and I have been considering to strategically place our weapons in the home for our easy access in case of home invasion.
I want to be prepared to stop any threat. I'm a chl and carry when it is legal for me to do so (employer limiting).

Some options are put the pistols and or shotgun out, then secure them when the kids visit until we can properly teach them.

My house has a split floor plan. I may need to install more sufficient outdoor lighting on the perimeter.

For home defense what is your plan
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 4:20:35 PM EDT
If I'm dressed, I'm armed. Gun in the night stand, and another in the kitchen. When I work from home the AR sits next to my desk.

Hardened doors, locked windows, and alarm systems are good, but your guns are your last line of defense.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 4:28:26 PM EDT
You MUST secure the firearms when children are in the house, regardless of how well trained they are. Secure can be a quick access safe or on your person.

We have a layered plan at our house, one that was put to the test several years ago. We learned lessons and modified it. The layer includes lighting, locks and a full perimeter alarm system. It includes a pistol on me most of the time. My layers DID include a GSD, but he had to be put down last summer. We really depended on him. We will be getting another GSD from kraftwerkk9 next year.

My wife and I have a plan for what to do in the middle of the night, during daylight when I am home, and when I am not home. My 15 year old daughter and my wife both shoot, and quite well.

Below is a little write up on an incident that happened a few years ago.

The alarm was set to instant, the German shepherd was in the backyard, and we were all peacefully asleep when suddenly the burglar alarm began to squeal. We have a plan for this, we have practiced the plan.

I grabbed the Kimber .45 and Surefire flashlight. My wife jumped up and went to the alarm keypad. As I put on my glasses, I told her to disarm the alarm.

I began down the hall to clear a path to my daughter’s bedroom upstairs. I noticed my wife following me down the hall and said to her; “no, like we practiced” She replied, “got it, ok, ok” then went into the bedroom and locked the door.

We have windows only on the front and rear of the house, so I quickly made a visual scan of the front windows, no apparent Point of Entry (POE). I made my way to the stairway, where I could see the den windows and the back door, but not the garage door. Again no apparent POE, and the dog was not barking.

Stairways are a tactical challenge, but I made my way to the top. I scanned across the playroom. There are 2 windows upstairs that are accessible from the roof without using a big ladder. One of those is my daughter's, and that window is alarmed. (she was about 8)

I could see her bed from the top of the stairs. It was empty….She has been instructed in the case of an alarm to get into the closet and wait for Daddy or the police. I made a beeline for her room while covering the non-cleared areas of the upstairs. Once in her room I called for her and gave the pre-arranged password. She came out of the closet rubbing her eyes, complaining that it was to late to practice. She then saw the gun and asked what was going on.

I told her to stay with me, and we made it back to the bedroom. The phone rang while I was clearing the house, and I assumed it was the alarm company. I gave the password to my wife that indicated I was safe to come in the room, and she let us in the bedroom. She was still on the phone with the alarm company. (not planned, but good thinking) She told the alarm company that all was well, and hung up.

We then turned on all of the lights and did a more thorough check. There was no indication or evidence of an attempted break-in. It had been raining, and there was no indication anyone had been outside near any window or door. Just a False Alarm.

Link Posted: 1/5/2012 4:53:37 PM EDT
Originally Posted By txinvestigator:
You MUST secure the firearms when children are in the house, regardless of how well trained they are. Secure can be a quick access safe or on your person.

We have a layered plan at our house, one that was put to the test several years ago. We learned lessons and modified it. The layer includes lighting, locks and a full perimeter alarm system. It includes a pistol on me most of the time. My layers DID include a GSD, but he had to be put down last summer. We really depended on him. We will be getting another GSD from kraftwerkk9 next year.

My wife and I have a plan for what to do in the middle of the night, during daylight when I am home, and when I am not home. My 15 year old daughter and my wife both shoot, and quite well.

Below is a little write up on an incident that happened a few years ago.

The alarm was set to instant, the German shepherd was in the backyard, and we were all peacefully asleep when suddenly the burglar alarm began to squeal. We have a plan for this, we have practiced the plan.


This is why we had reservations. My close neighbors when coming for a visit noticed I was carrying.
I grabbed the Kimber .45 and Surefire flashlight. My wife jumped up and went to the alarm keypad. As I put on my glasses, I told her to disarm the alarm.

I began down the hall to clear a path to my daughter’s bedroom upstairs. I noticed my wife following me down the hall and said to her; “no, like we practiced” She replied, “got it, ok, ok” then went into the bedroom and locked the door.

We have windows only on the front and rear of the house, so I quickly made a visual scan of the front windows, no apparent Point of Entry (POE). I made my way to the stairway, where I could see the den windows and the back door, but not the garage door. Again no apparent POE, and the dog was not barking.

Stairways are a tactical challenge, but I made my way to the top. I scanned across the playroom. There are 2 windows upstairs that are accessible from the roof without using a big ladder. One of those is my daughter's, and that window is alarmed. (she was about 8)

I could see her bed from the top of the stairs. It was empty….She has been instructed in the case of an alarm to get into the closet and wait for Daddy or the police. I made a beeline for her room while covering the non-cleared areas of the upstairs. Once in her room I called for her and gave the pre-arranged password. She came out of the closet rubbing her eyes, complaining that it was to late to practice. She then saw the gun and asked what was going on.

I told her to stay with me, and we made it back to the bedroom. The phone rang while I was clearing the house, and I assumed it was the alarm company. I gave the password to my wife that indicated I was safe to come in the room, and she let us in the bedroom. She was still on the phone with the alarm company. (not planned, but good thinking) She told the alarm company that all was well, and hung up.

We then turned on all of the lights and did a more thorough check. There was no indication or evidence of an attempted break-in. It had been raining, and there was no indication anyone had been outside near any window or door. Just a False Alarm.



We have always secured firearms when children are visiting. The only viable option for visiting children then is to carry on my person.
My close neighbors when coming for a visit have noticed that I was carrying when answering the door. I don't usually conceal when home.
My weapon is easily drawn without the concealment.
Having a family home defense plan. I like how you and your family handled that, you should be proud.
I think I can convince my wife and daughter to practice a plan similar to yours. Plan your Work. Work your Plan.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 5:00:31 PM EDT
Originally Posted By felrom:
If I'm dressed, I'm armed. Gun in the night stand, and another in the kitchen. When I work from home the AR sits next to my desk.

Hardened doors, locked windows, and alarm systems are good, but your guns are your last line of defense.


Agreed, though I can not be armed at all times due to employer policy (ISD).
I hate this but, I have to have a job. The new law covering employer parking lot does not apply to me.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 5:12:02 PM EDT
TXI has it. Layers and Layers of security do the trick. Gun is your LAST layer of security.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 9:32:27 PM EDT
would also like to recommend a dog to that layer of defense. our shih tzu is obviously an indoor dog, and will bark and growl at anyone that comes near the house, or even just walking down the sidewalk. not an attack dog, but an early warning system.

some of the houses in our neighborhood have the motion activated outside lights, and one even has the small security cameras. most houses (including ours) have some sort of security system.

have a plan and do some drills. identify points of entry, predetermine where your cover will be if you're going to engage the bad guys. and designate saferooms where you can barricade and hold a defensive position while calling 911.

not only do you want a firearm nearby, but also a cellphone. the wife's phone is usually charging in the bedroom, and mine is out in the living room.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 11:21:48 PM EDT
Small dogs who are allowed to bark at anything, are a pain in the ass. If you are going with a smaller dog, train them right, even as a small dog, they're usually your first line of D at the house. I have 3 Yorkshire Terrors(no misepelling, pun intended). They will run to the door, and sit there, waiting for the next sound, then if it's close, they'll bark like crazy, I love that about them. We're soon to be adding an alarm system as well, 360 degrees of alarm. All of my hunting rifles are unloaded, bolt stored seperately from the firearms, ammo locked up, until I get a gun safe. All I have now is an 8 gun cabinet with no luck on the case. I keep my mossberg with shells in the gun, chamber empty, along with my pistol in the nightstand when not on me with my led flashlight next to it. I think, especially with kids in the house, home security, and a plan that's know inside and out, is key to any SHTF situations.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 6:22:11 AM EDT
I know I'm missing something below. This is more to get into the mindset of protecting ones home not meant to be a full on check sheet.

Make a plan that everyone knows and practice is #1 priority.

Start with your front door, back door and garage door. - Reinforce the door frame and door. Deadbolt should have the longest throw possible. Deadbolts should be keyed both sides. Peep holes should be put in. Door should be reinforced type. Doors with glass, especially entering from the back yard should be replaced or a plastic security film put on. I hate to see where a small glass window in the door is all that needs to be broken before a bad guy can reach in and unlock the door.

Garage door is the easiest place to enter your home if it's attached. Keep it locked. Also make sure, if your garage is attached, that it's reinforced like a front and back door and KEEP it locked.

Next is windows. Latches need to be reinforced on most windows. Security film should be considered. Plant and maintain a short prickly bush under windows with easy access or use landscape to make it hard to approch them. Don't put large rocks in your yard for decoration or keep objects around that can be used to bust windows or glass in. Use blinds so people can't see in and look at your valuables.

Alarms are next. Volumes can be written but they should primarily let the bad guys know you know they are there. Secondary are functions like calling the police for you so if you are busy or away they know something is going on.

Lighting - Exterior lighting should be from both directions. Shining at your home and away from the home. You want to see them from the house and want them to be the star of the show looking from the street. They should feel uncomfortable and exposed to the world. Too much light one direction and your blinded and they can hide.

Next is inside your home. You need cover and concealment (learn the differences) somewhere where you can hold up till the good guys come. Reinforce the door of the master bedroom for example. Know where the dangerous places are in your home. Place mirrors to help you see into a room without going in first.

Landscaping is next. What can a bad guy hide behind? How can you slow their advance to your home? HOAs make this difficult.

Cameras are last. More to help after the fact than prevent.

Dogs, properly trained owners and dogs are good. You need to know what you want. A guard dog who's trained to alert the owner about something that is going on is going to be less expensive than a dog that is trained and trusted to attack on command. Most dogs who attack humans and aren't formally trained are more a risk than they are a safety.




Link Posted: 1/6/2012 9:18:11 AM EDT


Read this story too:

Black activists protest Asian owned gas station

The owner who I think is Korean, operates a gas station on MLK and Harwood. The area is just full of trashy people. The Nation of Islam hands out pamphlets on the sidewalk there, bums pee in the bushes and "flash mobs" of "youth" run roughshod over the store. So...the owner fights back. He uses pepper spray and stun guns on the people.

Now, the black community sees the owner as the problem, not the community itself. So they picket his store. Oddly, the picketers cross their own picket line to use the gas station bathroom and to buy snacks/drinks from the very store they picket.

Blacks say that Asian owners, who own almost all the stores in South Dallas are being racist in their business practices. My response is that there would not be any stores in South Dallas without brave Asian owners. Those people put up with a ton of crap on a daily basis. Crime and theft they have to fight themselves since the police will not respond.

Link Posted: 1/6/2012 10:55:30 AM EDT
Originally Posted By refidnasb1:

Read this story too:

Black activists protest Asian owned gas station
Now, the black community sees the owner as the problem, not the community itself. So they picket his store. Oddly, the picketers cross their own picket line to use the gas station bathroom and to buy snacks/drinks from the very store they picket.

Blacks say that Asian owners, who own almost all the stores in South Dallas are being racist in their business practices. My response is that there would not be any stores in South Dallas without brave Asian owners. Those people put up with a ton of crap on a daily basis. Crime and theft they have to fight themselves since the police will not respond.



Dang, what happened to all the black owned businesses?

On a serious note, there was one Asian owned donut store I used to frequent over by the VA hospital in South Dallas. I finally gave up on going there simply because I was hounded for money every time I stopped. The 7-11 next door was the same way. Last time I was there, they had an off duty sheriff's deputy inside trying to keep all of it at bay, but I still see 4 or 5 guys hanging out around outside. Screw it, there are other places to get donuts.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 11:07:26 AM EDT
Originally Posted By joemama74:


Dang, what happened to all the black owned businesses?



Asians are running most of the small retail shops in that area. Hispanics are starting to come on strong with muffler and tire shops down there too. That area does not have much going for it. There was a story out a few days ago that 60% of black females 13-25 had HIV in that area. There is no way to rebound from that.

There are not any banks, Starbucks, dry cleaners, chain restaurants or full scale grocery stores of note in that whole area. The people of that neighborhood have literally destroyed it.

I was invited for breakfast at city hall a couple days ago and got to casually talk one on one with many of the city council people. I'm not sure anyone can come up with a solution. Throwing money at it has not worked. One of those Oklahoma F5 tornadoes would work wonders.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 11:09:25 AM EDT

Originally Posted By refidnasb1:
Originally Posted By joemama74:


Dang, what happened to all the black owned businesses?



Asians are running most of the small retail shops in that area. Hispanics are starting to come on strong with muffler and tire shops down there too. That area does not have much going for it. There was a story out a few days ago that 60% of black females 13-25 had HIV in that area. There is no way to rebound from that.

There are not any banks, Starbucks, dry cleaners, chain restaurants or full scale grocery stores of note in that whole area. The people of that neighborhood have literally destroyed it.

I was invited for breakfast at city hall a couple days ago and got to casually talk one on one with many of the city council people. I'm not sure anyone can come up with a solution. Throwing money at it has not worked. One of those Oklahoma F5 tornadoes would work wonders.
Natural disasters only push the problem else where. Look at the results of Katrina.

Link Posted: 1/6/2012 11:25:12 AM EDT
Originally Posted By refidnasb1:
Originally Posted By joemama74:


Dang, what happened to all the black owned businesses?


There was a story out a few days ago that 60% of black females 13-25 had HIV in that area. There is no way to rebound from that.



You can't drive 2 miles down the highway in South Dallas without seeing one of these www.greaterthan.org billboards.

Back to the beginning of the part about urban survival. I take a gun just about everywhere I can legally. I live in Seagoville now, but still, if I hear a knock on my door, there's a gun in my back pocket before I look through the peep hole.


Link Posted: 1/6/2012 12:52:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Bishop3:
Originally Posted By felrom:
If I'm dressed, I'm armed. Gun in the night stand, and another in the kitchen. When I work from home the AR sits next to my desk.

Hardened doors, locked windows, and alarm systems are good, but your guns are your last line of defense.


Agreed, though I can not be armed at all times due to employer policy (ISD).
I hate this but, I have to have a job. The new law covering employer parking lot does not apply to me.
IIRC...

Before the parking lot carry law, the laws said that you could not bring a gun onto the premises of a school, with premises defined to exclude parking lots.
After the parking lot carry law, school districts now have the power to restrict an employee's right to leave them in their car in the school parking lots.

My wife is a high school teacher, and her district does not have an explicit policy on guns in cars on school policy. Every morning, she takes her gun out of her purse and locks it in her car before going into the building.

Maybe you know all that already, and maybe your district has an explicit policy against your gun in your car in the parking lot... but maybe not.

Link Posted: 1/6/2012 1:11:22 PM EDT
I know exactly how you feel having someone actually break into my home while home about 6 years ago. My guns were locked up in the safe in the other room. I had a bat and a knife to get there. Luckily they left before some stuff went down. But I have learned from that one. A pistol safe mounted under the bed has a judge in it. Me and the little lady both know how to use it. Along with a small tactical light as well. A few behind picture safes have some other toys hiding in them and I have a few maverick 88 12 gauges with 18 inch barrels and flipout stocks hidden as well. I still say like everyone else the guns are the last line of defense but I am only going to give them one warning once an intruder is in the house following that is going to be the rack of the gracious 12 guage everyone in the world knows what that sound is and they know you mean business once they hear it... You can get really creative with hiding spots and the only actual thing you need to have is a trigger safety on your guns by law it sucks but it makes it safer and the keys stay with me. Rule of thumb is to practice unlocking those things in the dark and doing it quite like. Also, my 12s are loaded with various ammo not just the good stuff. Number 7 bird shot to the face and body is going to hurt like a some ditch and make a not nice looking bad guy if anything is needed past that buckshot follows every other round. Having small kids in the house I would hate to have anything go through a wall and lose a loved one defending their little lifes. Bird shit is less likely to kill and hopefully less likely to go through drywall. Also, a cabinet lock in the kitchen and any other room is a great way to hide stuff and they can't into it as well.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 1:30:57 PM EDT
Originally Posted By felrom:

Originally Posted By Bishop3:
Originally Posted By felrom:
If I'm dressed, I'm armed. Gun in the night stand, and another in the kitchen. When I work from home the AR sits next to my desk.

Hardened doors, locked windows, and alarm systems are good, but your guns are your last line of defense.


Agreed, though I can not be armed at all times due to employer policy (ISD).
I hate this but, I have to have a job. The new law covering employer parking lot does not apply to me.
IIRC...

Before the parking lot carry law, the laws said that you could not bring a gun onto the premises of a school, with premises defined to exclude parking lots.
After the parking lot carry law, school districts now have the power to restrict an employee's right to leave them in their car in the school parking lots.
There really is no "parking lot carry law". The law to which you refer address employers, is in the Texas Labor Code and places restrictions on employers. It gives no advantage or priviledge to the employee.

And even before the law took effect, school districts could ban employees from possessing guns in their cars in parking lots.


Link Posted: 1/6/2012 4:04:31 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Barman84:
I know exactly how you feel having someone actually break into my home while home about 6 years ago. My guns were locked up in the safe in the other room. I had a bat and a knife to get there. Luckily they left before some stuff went down. But I have learned from that one. A pistol safe mounted under the bed has a judge in it. Me and the little lady both know how to use it. Along with a small tactical light as well. A few behind picture safes have some other toys hiding in them and I have a few maverick 88 12 gauges with 18 inch barrels and flipout stocks hidden as well. I still say like everyone else the guns are the last line of defense but I am only going to give them one warning once an intruder is in the house following that is going to be the rack of the gracious 12 guage everyone in the world knows what that sound is and they know you mean business once they hear it... You can get really creative with hiding spots and the only actual thing you need to have is a trigger safety on your guns by law it sucks but it makes it safer and the keys stay with me. Rule of thumb is to practice unlocking those things in the dark and doing it quite like. Also, my 12s are loaded with various ammo not just the good stuff. Number 7 bird shot to the face and body is going to hurt like a some ditch and make a not nice looking bad guy if anything is needed past that buckshot follows every other round. Having small kids in the house I would hate to have anything go through a wall and lose a loved one defending their little lifes. Bird shit is less likely to kill and hopefully less likely to go through drywall. Also, a cabinet lock in the kitchen and any other room is a great way to hide stuff and they can't into it as well.


I know this isn't what you meant, but damn that's just funny.

Link Posted: 1/6/2012 4:07:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/6/2012 4:08:05 PM EDT by MateFrio]
Horrible picture taken of the aftermath of a bird shit shootout\drive by.


Link Posted: 1/6/2012 4:11:00 PM EDT
Originally Posted By felrom:

Originally Posted By Bishop3:
Originally Posted By felrom:
If I'm dressed, I'm armed. Gun in the night stand, and another in the kitchen. When I work from home the AR sits next to my desk.

Hardened doors, locked windows, and alarm systems are good, but your guns are your last line of defense.


Agreed, though I can not be armed at all times due to employer policy (ISD).
I hate this but, I have to have a job. The new law covering employer parking lot does not apply to me.
IIRC...

Before the parking lot carry law, the laws said that you could not bring a gun onto the premises of a school, with premises defined to exclude parking lots.
After the parking lot carry law, school districts now have the power to restrict an employee's right to leave them in their car in the school parking lots.

My wife is a high school teacher, and her district does not have an explicit policy on guns in cars on school policy. Every morning, she takes her gun out of her purse and locks it in her car before going into the building.

Maybe you know all that already, and maybe your district has an explicit policy against your gun in your car in the parking lot... but maybe not.



I understood before I was an isd employee, I could leave a weapon in my car in the school parking lot. I will have to review the isd policy again. We should have gotten the parking lot carry law without restrictions. We can thank the business and industry lobby for these restrictions.
I hate this, it doesn't make sense knowing we have a right to keep and bear arms. This, especially with a chl background check.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 4:17:59 PM EDT
Originally Posted By joemama74:


Back to the beginning of the part about urban survival. I take a gun just about everywhere I can legally. I live in Seagoville now, but still, if I hear a knock on my door, there's a gun in my back pocket before I look through the peep hole.




I thought about putting in for the facility there, but I need to get away from the city. If I stay in Texas Im either going to Three Rivers, Bryan, or Big Spring.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 4:38:56 PM EDT
Originally Posted By MateFrio:
Horrible picture taken of the aftermath of a bird shit shootout\drive by.



If they only made a shotgun shell that would do this... Sales of the Taurus Judge would triple!
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 4:43:27 PM EDT
Originally Posted By txinvestigator:
Originally Posted By felrom:

Originally Posted By Bishop3:
Originally Posted By felrom:
If I'm dressed, I'm armed. Gun in the night stand, and another in the kitchen. When I work from home the AR sits next to my desk.

Hardened doors, locked windows, and alarm systems are good, but your guns are your last line of defense.


Agreed, though I can not be armed at all times due to employer policy (ISD).
I hate this but, I have to have a job. The new law covering employer parking lot does not apply to me.
IIRC...

Before the parking lot carry law, the laws said that you could not bring a gun onto the premises of a school, with premises defined to exclude parking lots.
After the parking lot carry law, school districts now have the power to restrict an employee's right to leave them in their car in the school parking lots.
There really is no "parking lot carry law". The law to which you refer address employers, is in the Texas Labor Code and places restrictions on employers. It gives no advantage or priviledge to the employee.
And even before the law took effect, school districts could ban employees from possessing guns in their cars in parking lots.



TXI I agree. Not to get off topic, though I would like to make my commute with my chl.
Could you clarify either one HB681 or SB321?
Apparently 'not enough restrictions' placed on the employers, effectively infringing on the employees rights.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 4:52:00 PM EDT
Originally Posted By joemama74:
If they only made a shotgun shell that would do this... Sales of the Taurus Judge would triple![/div]

Or if they took the rifling out of the Judge barrel. Shoot buckshot out of one and you will hit anything but the target.

Link Posted: 1/6/2012 5:00:35 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Bishop3:
Originally Posted By txinvestigator:
Originally Posted By felrom:

Originally Posted By Bishop3:
Originally Posted By felrom:
If I'm dressed, I'm armed. Gun in the night stand, and another in the kitchen. When I work from home the AR sits next to my desk.

Hardened doors, locked windows, and alarm systems are good, but your guns are your last line of defense.


Agreed, though I can not be armed at all times due to employer policy (ISD).
I hate this but, I have to have a job. The new law covering employer parking lot does not apply to me.
IIRC...

Before the parking lot carry law, the laws said that you could not bring a gun onto the premises of a school, with premises defined to exclude parking lots.
After the parking lot carry law, school districts now have the power to restrict an employee's right to leave them in their car in the school parking lots.
There really is no "parking lot carry law". The law to which you refer address employers, is in the Texas Labor Code and places restrictions on employers. It gives no advantage or priviledge to the employee.
And even before the law took effect, school districts could ban employees from possessing guns in their cars in parking lots.



TXI I agree. Not to get off topic, though I would like to make my commute with my chl.
Could you clarify either one HB681 or SB321?
Apparently 'not enough restrictions' placed on the employers, effectively infringing on the employees rights.


They are no longer HB or SB, they have been codfied into the labor code, chapter 52 (i). This laws simply tells employers that they cannot prohibit you from having a firearm or ammunition in parking lots, garages and other parking areas. School districts are an exception, and they can still prohibit you.

An employee of an ISD, both before and after this law was in effect, could not be criminally charged under penal code 46.03 for having a firearm in a school parking lot. However, the employee, both before and after this law went into effect, could be fired.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 5:04:43 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/6/2012 5:06:02 PM EDT by Bishop3]
Originally Posted By txinvestigator:
Originally Posted By Bishop3:
Originally Posted By txinvestigator:
Originally Posted By felrom:

Originally Posted By Bishop3:
Originally Posted By felrom:
If I'm dressed, I'm armed. Gun in the night stand, and another in the kitchen. When I work from home the AR sits next to my desk.

Hardened doors, locked windows, and alarm systems are good, but your guns are your last line of defense.


Agreed, though I can not be armed at all times due to employer policy (ISD).
I hate this but, I have to have a job. The new law covering employer parking lot does not apply to me.
IIRC

Before the parking lot carry law, the laws said that you could not bring a gun onto the premises of a school, with premises defined to exclude parking lots.
After the parking lot carry law, school districts now have the power to restrict an employee's right to leave them in their car in the school parking lots.
There really is no "parking lot carry law". The law to which you refer address employers, is in the Texas Labor Code and places restrictions on employers. It gives no advantage or priviledge to the employee.
And even before the law took effect, school districts could ban employees from possessing guns in their cars in parking lots.



TXI I agree. Not to get off topic, though I would like to make my commute with my chl.
Could you clarify either one HB681 or SB321?
Apparently 'not enough restrictions' placed on the employers, effectively infringing on the employees rights.


They are no longer HB or SB, they have been codfied into the labor code, chapter 52 (i). This laws simply tells employers that they cannot prohibit you from having a firearm or ammunition in parking lots, garages and other parking areas. School districts are an exception, and they can still prohibit you.

An employee of an ISD, both before and after this law was in effect, could not be criminally charged under penal code 46.03 for having a firearm in a school parking lot. However, the employee, both before and after this law went into effect, could be fired.


Clear, thanks.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 6:54:16 PM EDT
Originally Posted By txinvestigator:

And even before the law took effect, school districts could ban employees from possessing guns in their cars in parking lots.



This is the case at my wife's ISD.

We have layers of defense at the homestead:

Good exterior lighting
Dog with a big mean bark, unfortunately he is Bagel Hound but he will trip any intruders
After intruder trips over hound dog next obstacle and then kids toys
oh, yeah the alarm is likely going off also
By this time I or spousal unit shave have had time to acquire a firearm or two
Should all fail above intruder realises he broke into the wrong house and we don't have the good stuff.

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