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Posted: 12/29/2007 5:35:40 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/9/2008 11:38:49 PM EST by Winston_Wolf]
... I'm coming clean – I'm an admitted dirt-shooter. Not a fucking thing wrong with that – that is until you realize they're all just metal & plastic "toys" in the safe until you're able to deploy them effectively

... First and foremost, a heartfelt huge and sincere thank you to Yancey, Russell and Sean - It's a true sign of selflessness and commitment when these men take a day of their time to instruct a dozen-plus men on safe and proper weapon-handling. True, first-responders first-aid and skilled firearms drilling.

... Instruction similar to this today typically commands $50/hour and up. All three men exhibited pure professionalism. Aggressively taught and disciplined, when we made a misstep we were coached on where and why we went wrong - and told to do over until correct. Every one of my colleagues came away with something and as far as I know everyone benefited significantly or more.

- I drove home with a few things heavy on my mind.


  • Get in shape. If I'm gonna fight, I need to be physically able to do so in the first place. (Lose weight, build & sustain stamina and get my cardio up where it should be for a 50 y/o man)

  • Muscle memory through repetitive correct motion. Meaning, go slow and speed up as comfort affords. We don't have time or ammo to unlearn bad habits. Do it right - first, pick up the pace as proficiency is acquired

  • That wasn't a gun-range I was at today, it was a street in Baghdad, a shit-hole barrio at night in south Phoenix or any other hostile environment where some fucker wanted to kill me or my family. Plinking cans in the desert, silhouette target shooting or IPSC are all different games. None of which involve the level of adrenaline or seriousness as that as when you are simulating the killing of a bad person and preserving the lives of innocents.

  • Always remain keenly aware of your situation and surroundings

  • I'm lucky to have old friends like Shawn and Russell. And to find new resources like Yancy (ultimately making new friends in him) and to meet Internet faces with like-minded objective similar to those of mine.

  • Although the range isn't the typical place to make new friends, I believe I did so today - the icing on the cake if you will


  • ... My summary when asked, "the humiliation humbled me". I need more training. Whether it's going over the motions in my basement until bored, more "guys getting together and drilling" like today, of formal paid-for training, I need and want more.

    ... On the way home tonight, my sweetheart said to me on the cell-phone something to the effect, "I don't understand your enthusiasm for such behavior" (she's a European liberal - vegetarian). I didn't respond - perhaps ignorance is truly blissful; that is until reality punches you in the gut and your level of preparedness has you rolling over into submission or worse - death.

    ... Ever contemplate training or competing with your rifle and handgun? Do it, you will not be disappointed

    Thanks again men


    Link Posted: 12/29/2007 5:42:41 PM EST
    [Last Edit: 12/29/2007 5:48:24 PM EST by SinistralRifleman]
    Link Posted: 12/29/2007 5:54:43 PM EST
    Just out of curiosity, who taught the medical classes?
    Link Posted: 12/29/2007 5:56:52 PM EST
    Link Posted: 12/30/2007 11:02:28 PM EST
    My apologies if I should have started my own thread but......

    First and foremost a big thumbs up for Russel and Shawn from Cavalry Arms and Yancey from LMS defense.

    As an addendum to what was already stated by my esteemed colleague W_W:

    Though the class was brief, this was an excellent primer for those who are prepared to take the next step to a basic pistol or basic carbine class.

    Basic skills such as pistol presentation were stressed and practiced. Weapons handling also stressed economy of motion and the importance of weapon familiarization. Whenever possible, the instructors avoided absolutes. For instance:

    Instructing students to shoot 2 shots center of mass, then 1 in the head, and reholstering.

    Instilling a bad habit such as this could get someone killed. Forcing someone to break the natural tendency to get tunnel vision and scan the area for other threats is crucial. As Yancey put it, "Move your head, get that blood pumping";wise advice indeed. It ties in perfectly to what Russel stated "Gun fighting is problem solving"(how very true!). What we don't want is the conditioned response stated above in my example. I found this out the hard way during in the last exercise of the day. At the end of the exercise I unloaded and showed clear (as I had been instructed in 3 gun) even though I was never told to. Russel coached me through this brain fart.

    Trainging seperates the hype from reality. Gear that functioned just fine at home demonstrates its weakness when it is put in actual use. I have discovered that weaknesses are best discovered in a brightly lit, controlled environment.

    The brief medical training was also an eye opener. The Isreali bandage and a tourniquet is a must for every first aid kit.

    The instructors were patient and knowledgable.

    The class was an eye opener for me for several reasons:

    I need more practice.
    I need more practice.
    I need to practice more.
    I'm a fatass that needs to get in shape (actually there was no surprise in this statement).
    To the Boy Scout's dismay (or my recollection of it), a tourniquet is not necessarily a bad thing

    I have a new appreciation for NRA High Power. For those of you who didn't know, Ceramic God won the competition with a SBR'd Krink built by Turrican. This was clear example of how important markmanship is in the big scheme of gun fighting. You can't miss fast enough.

    On the way home, my buddy Gerod (first time shooting an AR in a class) couldn't stop talking about what an eye opening experience he had just participated in. To briefly reiterate his true sentiments "Wow I don't know shit!"

    Though I can relate to that statement, I plan to remedy it.
    Link Posted: 12/31/2007 5:31:48 AM EST
    [Last Edit: 12/31/2007 5:32:55 AM EST by ghengiskhabb]
    Notice in the picture below that my rifle is on the ground. That is because I don't know a thing about how to manage a sling and had to improvise. I had to disconnect to bandage the leg, but under stress did not think to reconnect, and had to set the rifle down for the final pistol shot.

    If anythying, you learn what you don't know how to do in these classes.




    Link Posted: 12/31/2007 9:54:57 AM EST

    Originally Posted By ghengiskhabb:

    If anythying, you learn what you don't know how to do in these classes.



    That's often the case when learning.

    Experience is learning from your mistakes

    Education is learning from someone elses.
    Link Posted: 1/9/2008 11:52:07 PM EST
    [Last Edit: 1/10/2008 5:19:04 AM EST by Winston_Wolf]

    Originally Posted By ghengiskhabb:
    Notice in the picture below that my rifle is on the ground. That is because I don't know a thing about how to manage a sling and had to improvise. I had to disconnect to bandage the leg, but under stress did not think to reconnect, and had to set the rifle down for the final pistol shot.

    If anything, you learn what you don't know how to do in these classes.






    ... You know, I've seriously wondered about the marketing potential for a multiple-location, quick-disconnect sling on an AR15 platform for some time now.

    ... Wonder if it's time to do some market research and preliminary design on a lightweight system that addresses your (our) concerns here. This arena has a huge potential for improvement that one could carve a small niche in this industry - if done simple, right & inexpensively. Heck, could it be your next million!
    Link Posted: 1/10/2008 2:22:45 AM EST
    Looks like ya'll had some fun. Just remember the old addage of it's better to sweat in training than to bleed in combat. That applies to LEO/Military and civilian alike. Train to fight and fight to train.
    Link Posted: 6/7/2008 7:56:05 AM EST

    Originally Posted By AJFinn:

    Looks like ya'll had some fun.


    ... We did, need to do something similar again soon
    Link Posted: 6/7/2008 10:45:32 AM EST

    Originally Posted By Winston_Wolf:

    Originally Posted By AJFinn:

    Looks like ya'll had some fun.


    ... We did, need to do something similar again soon

    I would definitely be up for that.

    When it gets cooler.
    Link Posted: 6/7/2008 10:56:55 AM EST
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