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Posted: 12/14/2011 5:52:50 PM EDT


where can I get these moon clips?
Link Posted: 12/14/2011 6:58:26 PM EDT
Need more info
Link Posted: 12/14/2011 8:26:17 PM EDT
Can't make out exact model/caliber of weapon.
WWII .45 acp clips sometimes at Sportsmansguide, Natchez or Cheaper than Dirt. 9mm call manufacturer. Clips for most models can be found at moonclips.com.
S&W revolvers can have cylinder machined to use moonclips for rimmed cartridges as well.
Link Posted: 12/14/2011 9:36:33 PM EDT
TK Customs
Link Posted: 12/15/2011 5:05:24 AM EDT
I had all of this typed out last night and my machine froze up and I lost it all. Out of frusteration I just posted what I did after the reboot.

here is the back story.
I was looking through the display case of mod 10 Australian trade ins at buds the other day and this one stood out to me. Here are some things that caught my eye.

It had been re-blued
It had a pinned barrel.
The dash number (which escapes me at the moment) dates it back to the 50's.
The action is uber tight.
The timing notches do not have the displaced metal that a revolver gets after a lot of use.
You can still see machining marks on the cylinder ratchets.

This revolver appeared to have been carried a lot and shot VERY little.

After shooting it and handling it a little I noticed that someone had the cylinders cut for moon clips! YAY!

So I started to look around on the net for full moon clips and noticed that there appears to be at least 2 different size / styles.

I saw the TK customs full moon clips, but the cylinders are cut MUCH farther than my revolver.


I lightened the image a little so you can see the cyl a bit better.
Link Posted: 12/15/2011 8:06:11 AM EDT
Another possible source is : revolversupply.com


Bob
Link Posted: 12/15/2011 9:15:15 AM EDT
Originally Posted By akturbo:
Another possible source is : revolversupply.com


Bob


No good there either.
Link Posted: 12/15/2011 5:25:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/15/2011 5:33:43 PM EDT by dsmjim]
Is that a model 19? Looks like a model 19 cylinder with recessed chambers.
Link Posted: 12/15/2011 6:10:34 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/15/2011 6:32:50 PM EDT by cutlass1972]
Originally Posted By dsmjim:
Is that a model 19? Looks like a model 19 cylinder with recessed chambers.


nope. model 10-6 38 spl.

Link Posted: 12/19/2011 9:34:10 AM EDT
Really? no one knows where I can get some moon clips for this gun?
Link Posted: 12/19/2011 7:09:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By cutlass1972:
Originally Posted By dsmjim:
Is that a model 19? Looks like a model 19 cylinder with recessed chambers.


nope. model 10-6 38 spl.


The cylinder looks recessed. Could you please get a profile picture of your gun with the cylinder closed? And have you tried to see if a .357 will fit? Companies CAN mis-stamp their guns; either that, or your cylinder doesn't seem right......unless it was recessed to shoot 9mm on clips.
Link Posted: 12/19/2011 8:06:23 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Seven-Shooter:

Originally Posted By cutlass1972:
Originally Posted By dsmjim:
Is that a model 19? Looks like a model 19 cylinder with recessed chambers.


nope. model 10-6 38 spl.


The cylinder looks recessed. Could you please get a profile picture of your gun with the cylinder closed? And have you tried to see if a .357 will fit? Companies CAN mis-stamp their guns; either that, or your cylinder doesn't seem right......unless it was recessed to shoot 9mm on clips.


The Cyl is recessed. I am sad to say I do not have a single 357 round to put my hands on right now.
Here are some detailed pics
http://s28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/?start=all
Link Posted: 12/19/2011 8:49:35 PM EDT
Wiki says: "After a small prototype run of Model 10-6 revolvers in .357 Magnum caliber, Smith and Wesson introduced the Model 13 heavy barrel in carbon steel..."

Did not know this - thought all M10s were 38s. Close-up pic of barrel caliber markings, please...
Link Posted: 12/20/2011 3:49:22 AM EDT
Originally Posted By chris65:
Wiki says: "After a small prototype run of Model 10-6 revolvers in .357 Magnum caliber, Smith and Wesson introduced the Model 13 heavy barrel in carbon steel..."

Did not know this - thought all M10s were 38s. Close-up pic of barrel caliber markings, please...


I will take pics if necessary, but I just double checked it says "38 s&w special ctg"

Link Posted: 12/20/2011 9:58:24 AM EDT
interesting. I came up with a fired 357 case and it fits right in the cylinder. I wonder if someone had the chambers in the cylinder reamed?
Link Posted: 12/22/2011 5:23:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By cutlass1972:
interesting. I came up with a fired 357 case and it fits right in the cylinder. I wonder if someone had the chambers in the cylinder reamed?

That would likely make the gun explode, unless it was one of those .357 versions.


Please post pictures of your revolver with the cylinder closed; is the back end of the cylinder face flush with the frame, or is there the usual "gap" in which one can easily see the cartridge rims if viewed from the side?

That would be an easy way to tell if it has a magnum cylinder installed or not.
Link Posted: 12/22/2011 5:44:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/22/2011 5:48:15 PM EDT by cutlass1972]
Originally Posted By Seven-Shooter:

Originally Posted By cutlass1972:
interesting. I came up with a fired 357 case and it fits right in the cylinder. I wonder if someone had the chambers in the cylinder reamed?

That would likely make the gun explode, unless it was one of those .357 versions.


Please post pictures of your revolver with the cylinder closed; is the back end of the cylinder face flush with the frame, or is there the usual "gap" in which one can easily see the cartridge rims if viewed from the side?

That would be an easy way to tell if it has a magnum cylinder installed or not.


I have read up on the back yard gunsmith 357 mod 10's. While I doubt SOME 357's would blow up a mod 10 I suspect it would stretch out the frame and cylinder pretty quick. Either way I have no intentions of shooting any 357's in it, I just find it interesting the piece of spent 357 brass drops right in. yes the rim is counter sunk into the cylinder, this also perplexes me..
Here are some more pics.









Link Posted: 12/23/2011 9:05:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By cutlass1972:
Originally Posted By Seven-Shooter:

Originally Posted By cutlass1972:
interesting. I came up with a fired 357 case and it fits right in the cylinder. I wonder if someone had the chambers in the cylinder reamed?

That would likely make the gun explode, unless it was one of those .357 versions.


Please post pictures of your revolver with the cylinder closed; is the back end of the cylinder face flush with the frame, or is there the usual "gap" in which one can easily see the cartridge rims if viewed from the side?

That would be an easy way to tell if it has a magnum cylinder installed or not.


I have read up on the back yard gunsmith 357 mod 10's. While I doubt SOME 357's would blow up a mod 10 I suspect it would stretch out the frame and cylinder pretty quick. Either way I have no intentions of shooting any 357's in it, I just find it interesting the piece of spent 357 brass drops right in. yes the rim is counter sunk into the cylinder, this also perplexes me..
Here are some more pics.
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4490.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4490cropped.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4489.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4489cropped.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4488.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4488cropped.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4487.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4487cropped.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4486.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4486cropped.jpg

Those pictures perfectly illustrate what I was the most curious about. Traditionally speaking, when a cylinder sits flush with the rear of the case rim against the frame and recoil plate there, it's a magnum cylinder. However, looking at that gun, the cylinder doesn't appear to have the same typical finish as the frame, which intrigues me, and the barrel would HAVE to be relieved for the longer cylinder in order for that to work.

I'd say it's definitely worth calling S&W to see if yours is one of the early experimental-type guns in .357 on the 10 frame, 'cause it looks that way.
Link Posted: 12/23/2011 10:20:55 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Seven-Shooter:

Originally Posted By cutlass1972:
Originally Posted By Seven-Shooter:

Originally Posted By cutlass1972:
interesting. I came up with a fired 357 case and it fits right in the cylinder. I wonder if someone had the chambers in the cylinder reamed?

That would likely make the gun explode, unless it was one of those .357 versions.


Please post pictures of your revolver with the cylinder closed; is the back end of the cylinder face flush with the frame, or is there the usual "gap" in which one can easily see the cartridge rims if viewed from the side?

That would be an easy way to tell if it has a magnum cylinder installed or not.


I have read up on the back yard gunsmith 357 mod 10's. While I doubt SOME 357's would blow up a mod 10 I suspect it would stretch out the frame and cylinder pretty quick. Either way I have no intentions of shooting any 357's in it, I just find it interesting the piece of spent 357 brass drops right in. yes the rim is counter sunk into the cylinder, this also perplexes me..
Here are some more pics.
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4490.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4490cropped.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4489.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4489cropped.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4488.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4488cropped.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4487.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4487cropped.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4486.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4486cropped.jpg

Those pictures perfectly illustrate what I was the most curious about. Traditionally speaking, when a cylinder sits flush with the rear of the case rim against the frame and recoil plate there, it's a magnum cylinder. However, looking at that gun, the cylinder doesn't appear to have the same typical finish as the frame, which intrigues me, and the barrel would HAVE to be relieved for the longer cylinder in order for that to work.

I'd say it's definitely worth calling S&W to see if yours is one of the early experimental-type guns in .357 on the 10 frame, 'cause it looks that way.

I will call Smith ASAP. It would be really cool, but it has without a doubt been reblued, so any real collectors value is gone.

BTW: the barrel is defiantly marked 38 s&w special
Link Posted: 12/24/2011 5:07:28 AM EDT

Originally Posted By cutlass1972:
Originally Posted By Seven-Shooter:

Originally Posted By cutlass1972:
Originally Posted By Seven-Shooter:

Originally Posted By cutlass1972:
interesting. I came up with a fired 357 case and it fits right in the cylinder. I wonder if someone had the chambers in the cylinder reamed?

That would likely make the gun explode, unless it was one of those .357 versions.


Please post pictures of your revolver with the cylinder closed; is the back end of the cylinder face flush with the frame, or is there the usual "gap" in which one can easily see the cartridge rims if viewed from the side?

That would be an easy way to tell if it has a magnum cylinder installed or not.


I have read up on the back yard gunsmith 357 mod 10's. While I doubt SOME 357's would blow up a mod 10 I suspect it would stretch out the frame and cylinder pretty quick. Either way I have no intentions of shooting any 357's in it, I just find it interesting the piece of spent 357 brass drops right in. yes the rim is counter sunk into the cylinder, this also perplexes me..
Here are some more pics.
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4490.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4490cropped.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4489.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4489cropped.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4488.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4488cropped.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4487.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4487cropped.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4486.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c208/cutlass1972/mod%2010/DSC_4486cropped.jpg

Those pictures perfectly illustrate what I was the most curious about. Traditionally speaking, when a cylinder sits flush with the rear of the case rim against the frame and recoil plate there, it's a magnum cylinder. However, looking at that gun, the cylinder doesn't appear to have the same typical finish as the frame, which intrigues me, and the barrel would HAVE to be relieved for the longer cylinder in order for that to work.

I'd say it's definitely worth calling S&W to see if yours is one of the early experimental-type guns in .357 on the 10 frame, 'cause it looks that way.

I will call Smith ASAP. It would be really cool, but it has without a doubt been reblued, so any real collectors value is gone.

BTW: the barrel is defiantly marked 38 s&w special

Right; but if that's a real .357 cylinder, S&W would've had to shorten the amount of barrel protruding backwards from the frame towards the cylinder, in order to accommodate the longer cylinder (at least judging from more recent exampled at work, I'll double check here in a few minutes when I go in).
Link Posted: 12/24/2011 6:54:59 AM EDT
You may have figured this out already but that gun does not appear to have the proper recesses for moon clips.
Link Posted: 12/24/2011 4:20:28 PM EDT
I picked up a box of factory winchester 110gr 357's. They drop right in. No I do not have any intentions of firing them in it, but I was curious if thew would fit or not.
Link Posted: 12/24/2011 4:37:44 PM EDT
I guess I'm confused.
I thought you only needed moon clips if the revolver you are using shoots rimless cartridges (usu. autoloading, 45ACP, 9mm, 40etc).
I know that Charter Arms has supposedly created a revolver that can shoot rimless cartridges without using moon clips.
If you are trying to shoot 38 or 357 why do you need moon clips?
Link Posted: 12/24/2011 4:47:25 PM EDT
That looks like an early Model 10 ,38 special and should have .38 special written on the barrel. The early guns had recessed cylinders. They were not made for moon clips.

I do not recommend you shoot .357 mags in it, even if they fit in the cylinder (which they should not).

Link Posted: 12/24/2011 5:23:34 PM EDT
I studied my "standard catalog of Smith & Wesson". I read that the pre model 13 model 10's had a 1.67" cyl whereas the 38spl cyl is 1.56. The Cylinder in my gun measures 1.675".

Link Posted: 12/24/2011 5:39:00 PM EDT
Originally Posted By oldcop041:
That looks like an early Model 10 ,38 special and should have .38 special written on the barrel. The early guns had recessed cylinders. They were not made for moon clips.

I do not recommend you shoot .357 mags in it, even if they fit in the cylinder (which they should not).



There were a small number of model 10s (10-6) that were made in .357. It appears the OP may have one of those. I wouldn't shoot heavy loads but I would guess that current factory loads would be just fine since they are pretty mild compared to the original.
Link Posted: 12/24/2011 5:41:33 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ajm1911:
I guess I'm confused.
I thought you only needed moon clips if the revolver you are using shoots rimless cartridges (usu. autoloading, 45ACP, 9mm, 40etc).
I know that Charter Arms has supposedly created a revolver that can shoot rimless cartridges without using moon clips.
If you are trying to shoot 38 or 357 why do you need moon clips?


Some revolvers in rimmed calibers are cut for moon clips for ease/speed of loading/unloading. Several S&W Pro series and Performance Center revolvers are currently offered cut for moon clips (in .38/.357) and it has been a relatively common custom feature as well.
Link Posted: 12/24/2011 11:24:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By cutlass1972:
I studied my "standard catalog of Smith & Wesson". I read that the pre model 13 model 10's had a 1.67" cyl whereas the 38spl cyl is 1.56. The Cylinder in my gun measures 1.675".


I was coming back to post that the .357 cylinder guns do have a notably longet cylinder and shorter forcing cone.


I'd call S&W to figure out WTH you own.
Link Posted: 12/25/2011 7:36:53 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Seven-Shooter:

Originally Posted By cutlass1972:
I studied my "standard catalog of Smith & Wesson". I read that the pre model 13 model 10's had a 1.67" cyl whereas the 38spl cyl is 1.56. The Cylinder in my gun measures 1.675".


I was coming back to post that the .357 cylinder guns do have a notably longet cylinder and shorter forcing cone.


I'd call S&W to figure out WTH you own.


Yes, I am going to for sure. I am sure they are closed until after the 1st of the year though. I am going to send an email in the mean time. it may get answered sooner.
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 4:41:14 PM EDT
I finally got a response:

My Message to S&W:



I recently acquired a rather interesting model 10-6. The thing that is weird about it is that the cylkender appears to be 357 but the barrel is stampred 38 smith and Wesson special. I read in my "Sandard Catalogue of Smith & Wesson" that there was a short run of mod 10-6's that where chambered for 357, but like I said the barrel is marked 38spl. The cylender is cut so that the case rims are recessed, and the cylender measures 1.67" as would be a 357 vs 1.56" for a 38spl.
For what it is worth this gun was an Australian police trade in gun.

here is a link to a bunch of pics of the gun.

Link to images of strange mod 10

The Serial number of this revolver is C913***

Thank you in advance


S&W's response:


Robert, your Model 10-6 was shipped from Smith & Wesson in January 1967 and was a standard Model 10 in .38 S&W Special. It appears someone has modified it to .357 Magnum. It is not one of the Model 10 built in that caliber in the early 1970s. I do not know how it got to Australia as it was a New York City Police revolver. I hope that this helps. **blanked**, Historian, smith & Wesson
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 6:48:40 PM EDT
Interesting, that was not what I expected. I wonder where it has been over it's lifetime.

Originally Posted By cutlass1972:
I finally got a response:

My Message to S&W:



I recently acquired a rather interesting model 10-6. The thing that is weird about it is that the cylkender appears to be 357 but the barrel is stampred 38 smith and Wesson special. I read in my "Sandard Catalogue of Smith & Wesson" that there was a short run of mod 10-6's that where chambered for 357, but like I said the barrel is marked 38spl. The cylender is cut so that the case rims are recessed, and the cylender measures 1.67" as would be a 357 vs 1.56" for a 38spl.
For what it is worth this gun was an Australian police trade in gun.

here is a link to a bunch of pics of the gun.

Link to images of strange mod 10

The Serial number of this revolver is C913***

Thank you in advance


S&W's response:


Robert, your Model 10-6 was shipped from Smith & Wesson in January 1967 and was a standard Model 10 in .38 S&W Special. It appears someone has modified it to .357 Magnum. It is not one of the Model 10 built in that caliber in the early 1970s. I do not know how it got to Australia as it was a New York City Police revolver. I hope that this helps. **blanked**, Historian, smith & Wesson


Link Posted: 1/4/2012 5:15:58 AM EDT
I agree, I would LOVE to know the full history of this gun. I wonder if the NYC police dpt could tell me anything. I suspect they would just tell me to go piss up a rope.
How the heck did it end up in Australia as a police revolver from NYC as a police revolver?

I cannot imagine that someone would spend all the money / time to put a 357 cylinder in this revolver. It is obviously an actual 357 cylinder as opposed to a 38spl cylinder that has been reamed to 357. Being as it is a pinned barrel, they would have to press the pin out, unscrew the barrel, fit and time the cylinder to the frame, cut the forcing cone of the barrel down to accommodate the longer cylinder (which they did a beautiful job of), screw the barrel back in, and press the pin back in.

It had to have been a pet project or something.

I replied back to the email I received from S&W inquiring whether there was anything different about the 10-6's that where chambered for 357 other than the cylinder. I am wondering if it is safe to shoot 357's in it. If there is no difference in the frame, and whomever did the work fitted an actual 357 cylinder to it, then theoretically it should be OK to fire 357 in it.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 5:18:26 AM EDT
You know something that just occurred to me that I had not thought of before. I wonder if there is any flame cutting in the top strap where the original cylinder used to end. I will have to check this when I get home from work today.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 8:48:35 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/4/2012 8:49:59 PM EDT by Seven-Shooter]

Originally Posted By cutlass1972:
I agree, I would LOVE to know the full history of this gun. I wonder if the NYC police dpt could tell me anything. I suspect they would just tell me to go piss up a rope.
How the heck did it end up in Australia as a police revolver from NYC as a police revolver?

I cannot imagine that someone would spend all the money / time to put a 357 cylinder in this revolver. It is obviously an actual 357 cylinder as opposed to a 38spl cylinder that has been reamed to 357. Being as it is a pinned barrel, they would have to press the pin out, unscrew the barrel, fit and time the cylinder to the frame, cut the forcing cone of the barrel down to accommodate the longer cylinder (which they did a beautiful job of), screw the barrel back in, and press the pin back in.

It had to have been a pet project or something.

I replied back to the email I received from S&W inquiring whether there was anything different about the 10-6's that where chambered for 357 other than the cylinder. I am wondering if it is safe to shoot 357's in it. If there is no difference in the frame, and whomever did the work fitted an actual 357 cylinder to it, then theoretically it should be OK to fire 357 in it.

If S&W doesn't know the how or why of it, much less how it got around the planet and back, I wouldn't shoot rounds that could even "theoretically" make your gun a grenade.

How is it you think it's an Australian police model? I wasn't paying attention to any possible police indicators in the earlier pictures, only the cylinder bits.

ETA: Looked through the pictures––-no indication of it being an Aussie unit, only that you said it was in the same case as the police trade ins.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 4:59:27 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Seven-Shooter:

Originally Posted By cutlass1972:
I agree, I would LOVE to know the full history of this gun. I wonder if the NYC police dpt could tell me anything. I suspect they would just tell me to go piss up a rope.
How the heck did it end up in Australia as a police revolver from NYC as a police revolver?

I cannot imagine that someone would spend all the money / time to put a 357 cylinder in this revolver. It is obviously an actual 357 cylinder as opposed to a 38spl cylinder that has been reamed to 357. Being as it is a pinned barrel, they would have to press the pin out, unscrew the barrel, fit and time the cylinder to the frame, cut the forcing cone of the barrel down to accommodate the longer cylinder (which they did a beautiful job of), screw the barrel back in, and press the pin back in.

It had to have been a pet project or something.

I replied back to the email I received from S&W inquiring whether there was anything different about the 10-6's that where chambered for 357 other than the cylinder. I am wondering if it is safe to shoot 357's in it. If there is no difference in the frame, and whomever did the work fitted an actual 357 cylinder to it, then theoretically it should be OK to fire 357 in it.

If S&W doesn't know the how or why of it, much less how it got around the planet and back, I wouldn't shoot rounds that could even "theoretically" make your gun a grenade.

How is it you think it's an Australian police model? I wasn't paying attention to any possible police indicators in the earlier pictures, only the cylinder bits.

ETA: Looked through the pictures––-no indication of it being an Aussie unit, only that you said it was in the same case as the police trade ins.

Buds (the distributor) is actually local to me. They had a couple of glass display units full of model 10's. I was told that they where bought as a pallet lot of Australian police trade ins. I suppose they may have had a random mod 10 laying around and tossed it in the case as well. This one stood out to me just because it locked up WAY tighter than the others, had a target trigger and hammer, slick as a whistle trigger, and had been reblued.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:27:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By cutlass1972:
Originally Posted By Seven-Shooter:

Originally Posted By cutlass1972:
I agree, I would LOVE to know the full history of this gun. I wonder if the NYC police dpt could tell me anything. I suspect they would just tell me to go piss up a rope.
How the heck did it end up in Australia as a police revolver from NYC as a police revolver?

I cannot imagine that someone would spend all the money / time to put a 357 cylinder in this revolver. It is obviously an actual 357 cylinder as opposed to a 38spl cylinder that has been reamed to 357. Being as it is a pinned barrel, they would have to press the pin out, unscrew the barrel, fit and time the cylinder to the frame, cut the forcing cone of the barrel down to accommodate the longer cylinder (which they did a beautiful job of), screw the barrel back in, and press the pin back in.

It had to have been a pet project or something.

I replied back to the email I received from S&W inquiring whether there was anything different about the 10-6's that where chambered for 357 other than the cylinder. I am wondering if it is safe to shoot 357's in it. If there is no difference in the frame, and whomever did the work fitted an actual 357 cylinder to it, then theoretically it should be OK to fire 357 in it.

If S&W doesn't know the how or why of it, much less how it got around the planet and back, I wouldn't shoot rounds that could even "theoretically" make your gun a grenade.

How is it you think it's an Australian police model? I wasn't paying attention to any possible police indicators in the earlier pictures, only the cylinder bits.

ETA: Looked through the pictures––-no indication of it being an Aussie unit, only that you said it was in the same case as the police trade ins.

Buds (the distributor) is actually local to me. They had a couple of glass display units full of model 10's. I was told that they where bought as a pallet lot of Australian police trade ins. I suppose they may have had a random mod 10 laying around and tossed it in the case as well. This one stood out to me just because it locked up WAY tighter than the others, had a target trigger and hammer, slick as a whistle trigger, and had been reblued.

Surefire sign of some major work being done. I'm not aware of too many model 10s with the TH and TT, mostly that's on the adjustable sight guns that I've seen.

Seems like the best you can go on is to try and find some specs on old New York Police guns; I'm gonna go with what S&W told you, vs. any guy in a LGS.
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