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Posted: 5/31/2008 6:41:29 PM EST
Looking to collect a few spare parts for my G17s, and was wondering about upgrading to a stainless steel guide rod. Any thoughts from those who've been down that road?

Thanks!
Link Posted: 5/31/2008 6:49:35 PM EST
My personal opinion is replace the stock one w/stainless.

I have done all my Glocks.
Plastic breaks. I like the additional weight of the stainless rod also.

It's a personal thing. Chances are the plastic stock one will never be a problem but who likes leaving something like this to chance.
Link Posted: 5/31/2008 6:51:32 PM EST
The stock rod has never failed me in over 7000 rounds.

If it ain't broke don't fix it.
Link Posted: 5/31/2008 7:15:22 PM EST
Stick with factory parts in your Glocks...
Link Posted: 5/31/2008 7:38:06 PM EST
I stuck one on my G17C only because I have a full auto sear on it. At the cyclic rate that gun shoots at I figured SS would be better.
Link Posted: 5/31/2008 8:59:20 PM EST
If you are looking for weight, keep the plastic. I made one out of carbide and could not tell the difference in shooting.
Link Posted: 5/31/2008 9:15:52 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/31/2008 9:16:29 PM EST by STG77]
I would get one if I wanted to experiment with lighter weight recoil springs for shooting "poofter" loads, but other than that I think they're pointless.
Link Posted: 5/31/2008 10:19:13 PM EST
I hardly ever hear stories about problems with Glocks that are left stock. Almost always, they come from someone who's decided to change parts or use reloads. Good luck.
Link Posted: 5/31/2008 10:28:05 PM EST
Plastic guide rods DO break occasionally. I put aftermarket guide rods (stainless or tungsten depending on the application) on all my Glocks. I've shot a few Glocks with Sprinco dual-rate springs - they make a nice difference but they're pretty spendy at $75.

There's lots of folks here that advocate keeping a Glock totally stock. My opinion? EVERY Glock can be made better with at least trigger components and sights.
Link Posted: 6/1/2008 12:22:57 AM EST
Night sights/ammunition/magazines

Anything else is a waste of $, just start saving for the next one
Link Posted: 6/1/2008 6:20:09 AM EST
I keep my Glocks stock and keep a fair number of spare parts--including some aftermarket steel guide rods--this way if some bizarre cosmic force effects all of the Glock recoil spring rods--I can swap it

I tried it in my G17 and couldn't tell the difference--so I got 'em if I need 'em--but I figure I won't.
Link Posted: 6/1/2008 8:55:39 AM EST
It's a "solution" desperately searching for a problem.
Link Posted: 6/1/2008 9:10:49 AM EST
I'm with the vast majority here:
Keep your Glock completely stock - with the exception of the sights - swap the sights out for steel sights (I like XS Big Dots).



Link Posted: 6/1/2008 11:17:34 AM EST
As my Glock armorer instructer put it at school this year: "The only reason there is a guide rod in the gun is to help you get the spring in and out."

It doesn't flex, and very little pressure is applied during the cycle of operation to this part. Even if it does break, it's one of seven partS in a Glock pistol that can be broken and the gun will still function. The steel, tungsden, titanium, etc, rodS out there are a gimmick to part fools from money, nothing more.

And as others have stated, keep your Glock stock.
Link Posted: 6/1/2008 6:38:56 PM EST
some like em, some prefer stock

i prefer stock, YMMV
Link Posted: 6/2/2008 10:11:11 AM EST
Thanks, gentlemen. I appreciate all of the feedback. Looks like my spare parts collection will include plain ol' stock guide rods/recoil springs. That certainly works for me--I can spend more on ammo that way!
Link Posted: 6/2/2008 5:02:02 PM EST

Originally Posted By P08:
I stuck one on my G17C only because I have a full auto sear on it. At the cyclic rate that gun shoots at I figured SS would be better.


Can I see this? please? Just curious. I am assuming you are a SOT Dealer of some type.h
Link Posted: 6/3/2008 3:14:55 AM EST

Originally Posted By xmikex:
I'm with the vast majority here:
Keep your Glock completely stock - with the exception of the sights - swap the sights out for steel sights (I like XS Big Dots).





Agreed.

As was mentioned earlier, it is not necessary for the function of the gun. The guide rod can be broken in half and the gun will still function. For the money you'd spend on an aftermarket guide rod you could have enough stock ones to easily last the life of the gun.

Stick with stock for everything but the sights. Nothing kills the reliability like messing with the factory confirguration.

If you want to change something like the trigger weight, slide release, or mag release stick with stock parts.

Link Posted: 6/3/2008 7:54:16 AM EST
All my Glocks (17's and 19's) have stainless steel guide rods.

I have had only one polymer rod chip (on the flange) in the twenty years that I have had Glocks and although it was not enough to impair the function of my Glock (a 17), I have always traded them out after that for a stainless steel rod ($12.00) and I keep the O.E.M. assembly as a 'spare'. I consider the stainless rod to be much more durable and less likely to break than the plastic rod and once reliability has been established (after 500-1000 rounds), I view it as a form of "insurance" against breakage.

I doubt that I have solved any 'problem' but, the stainless steel unit gives me "peace of mind".

TK
Link Posted: 6/3/2008 12:51:12 PM EST
glocks run better stock, when people start making all these "upgrades and add ons" that is when things like to go down hill.
Link Posted: 6/3/2008 1:26:52 PM EST
I like my Glock stock, never any problems with guide rods in 20 years of shooting.
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