Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
PSA
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 9/19/2005 9:39:03 PM EDT
Be kind.

I've recently inherited several guns.  Two are 45 revolvers.  One is a model 25 which takes some giant rounds (magnum rounds?).  The other is an older one that just takes the regular sized stuff (I assume).

My questions

1. Where is a good place to get some ammo for these babies.  Seems like the few places I've tried only have 45 ACP.  

2. It looks like the model 25 can chamber the smaller (shorter) 45 rounds.  Is it safe to fire them or do I have to use the elephant-killers.

Thank you
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 9:50:35 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/19/2005 9:54:02 PM EDT by TacticalPenguin]
What do the revovlers actually say for caliber?


there are many different .45 calibers and not all are interchangeable , most in any way whatsoever


Calibers I own (or have owned)

.455 Colt (for the old Webley revovlers, narrow rim, will shoot in most .45 caliber rimmed revovlers, not the best choice though)   this ammunition is stil available as factory ammunition.

.45 auto rim - a cartridge made for .45 revovlers that normally require half moon or full moon clips, to simplify loading, I haven't seen this ammunition in years

.45 auto, used in the 1917 revovler (among others) usually required half moon or full moon clips, this ammunition can be bought anywhere

.45 Schofield - antiquated cartridge making a comeback, you can shoot .455 in one of these revovlers, but only if th ecylinder has the clearance, Black Hills makes this ammunition for the cowboy shooters now, anemic loads but fun

.45 Colt (long colt to some) - longer Colt cartridge, will shoot the Schofield round as well, becoming much more common nowadays, this caliber has seen a recent resurrgence in popularity, if you have an older firearm make sure to use lighter laods, cowboy loads being a good start. DSome old pistols cannot handle the modern pressures

.454 Casull longer hihger pressure version of the .45 colt, snappy some would call it a "magnum" cartridge.  Factory available, though you may have ot order it in, thumpy as hell.

.460 S&W longer than the Casull cartridge, still reverse compatible to calibers that will fire safely in a .45 colt.  Factory ammunition available, but I doubt you inherited one of these, they are pretty damn new






there are others but these are the ones you are likely to come into contact with with any degree of likelihood.


So which do you want info and help on?

Link Posted: 9/20/2005 11:14:40 AM EDT
OK, I've done some more checking.  Please tell if I'm being foolish.

The newer 45 is a S&W model 25-9.  I found some 45 colt rounds my dad left for it so I assume that is correct.

The older 45 is a S&W, but there is no model stamped on it.  He also left some 45 auto rounds in the moon clips for it.  Also 1917 sounds very familiar.  Much to my shame, I didn't pay full enough attention when he first showed me the gun years ago.  On the side of the barrel, is stamped S&W D.A. 45.  On the top of the barrel, the patent info is FEB.6.06.SEPT.14.09.DEC.29.14.  Is this the 1917?  Will I always be fated to use the little moon clips?

While I plan to sell the model 25 (It still looks new), I'll probably hang onto the older 45.  It works, but it's not pretty.  My dad found it under a layer of dust in a pawn shop.  The owner made a mistake in pricing it and my dad jumped on it.  That's how he got many of his guns, including a like new H&K USP 40 for $585 out the door.  That one I'm also keeping.  :)

Thank you.  As always, I'm blown away by the quality of the answers.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 11:30:45 AM EDT
The 1917 was a stopgap weapon produced during WW1 and after to fill the holsters of our men when they couldn't produce enough 1911 autos.  Early production '17s required the moon clips, but some of the later ones have stepped cylinders that will allow use without the clips.  Downside is that without clips, the ejector star has nothing to grab onto, so cases must be driven out individually by hand with a stick or something.  Half-moons are fairly available though, and really speed up loading.  

The above was from an article I literally read an hour ago on my lunch break from some surplus gun rag or another.  The article focused on the Colt 1917.  Smith & Wesson made 'em too, but I'm unsure as to the presence of stepped cylinders on the smithies.

If you're getting into firearms now as a hobby, I would keep both revolvers.  In my case I never had the slightest interest in wheelguns until very recently when I inherited a S&W "Terrier" snubnose that my grandfather carried plainclothes.  It really sparked an interest, and I'd be kicking myself to have sold one off like that.  I've had my eye open for a good '17 for a while now.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 11:59:31 AM EDT
Yea, that's really tempting.  And the longer I hold onto these, the more attached I get.  I guess I just don't want to be one of those gun nuts with enough hardware to start my own cult...
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 3:30:46 PM EDT
Don't sell your fathers guns! You will regret it in the future.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 5:38:07 PM EDT
Listen to those who are telling you not to sell those weapons!


revolvers amy not be in style now, but they will be again. And those pieces of history you have are very good examples to hold onto (1000 fold because they are inherited)


Besides, nothing wrong with having wheelguns for when you are teaching a young'in to shoot or a lady, .45 colt can be laoded light, and .45 acp already is light

Enjoy them, take care of them, so they can be passed down to family when you pass on in another 70 or 80 years
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 5:38:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By XM21Nick:
Don't sell your fathers guns! You will regret it in the future.



A big +1 on this.  I would never part with the guns I inherited from my Dad.  They will be passed down to my children and hopefully their children.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 6:37:08 PM EDT
You guys aren't making this any easier, but those are wonderful sentiments.  Thank you.  

Believe me, I've been second guessing my decision to sell some of them.  I'll wait until I can inventory the entire lot before I start making any decisions.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 7:36:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By InheritedAnArsenal:
You guys aren't making this any easier, but those are wonderful sentiments.  Thank you.  

Believe me, I've been second guessing my decision to sell some of them.  I'll wait until I can inventory the entire lot before I start making any decisions.



Sounds like you got quite the stash.  If money's tight though, sentiment don't pay the bills.

Good luck with whatever you decide, and don't hesitate to ask around here.. We all love to play "guess that gun".  
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 7:51:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By WinstonSmith:
Sounds like you got quite the stash.  If money's tight though, sentiment don't pay the bills.

Good luck with whatever you decide, and don't hesitate to ask around here.. We all love to play "guess that gun".  



The stash is impressive.  He was a cop many years ago and I'd never consider selling anything that had a story associated w/ it.  He was quite the storyteller.  The original plan was to sell some of the newer stuff and give it to my mom though I'm not sure if she'd take it.  Most of which were just good buys.  Now, I'm still not sure. That and the money isn't terribly tight.  Decisions, decisions.

Right now, I'm just having a ball taking them to the range and learning about them.
Link Posted: 9/24/2005 4:40:55 AM EDT
Defiantly keep the guns!!!

However if you intend to shoot them, do not rely on barrel markings or internet forum advice!

Take the guns to gunsmith and have them determine the correct cartridge for each! Write it down too.

Many of the M1917s (Colt & S&W) were converted after the war to accept .45 Colt. The barrel stampings were never changed…
Link Posted: 9/24/2005 7:27:57 AM EDT
Good advice [keep em] already given.
Know that you can send the revolvers directly to Smith and they will clean/inspect/package these for you for a very reasonable fee. You will then be assured they are both protected and ready.
Link Posted: 9/25/2005 11:50:47 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Parrot32:
Defiantly keep the guns!!!

However if you intend to shoot them, do not rely on barrel markings or internet forum advice!

Take the guns to gunsmith and have them determine the correct cartridge for each! Write it down too.

Many of the M1917s (Colt & S&W) were converted after the war to accept .45 Colt. The barrel stampings were never changed…



I'm leaning more and more towards keeping them.  They're just too nice and it's hard to beat that they were my father's guns.

That's a good point about the 1917, but I know that it can't chamber a 45 long colt.  Plus I fired off a few of the 45 ACP that my dad had for it and it worked great.

Thanks
Link Posted: 9/25/2005 11:51:47 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ALAN308:
Good advice [keep em] already given.
Know that you can send the revolvers directly to Smith and they will clean/inspect/package these for you for a very reasonable fee. You will then be assured they are both protected and ready.



I didn't know that.  Good advice if I plan to store them for a time.

Link Posted: 9/25/2005 11:57:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By InheritedAnArsenal:
I guess I just don't want to be one of those gun nuts with enough hardware to start my own cult...



The problem with having that much hardware is .... ?  There's nothing wrong with liking and owning a boatload of firearms, despite what the bedwetters and soccer moms will tell you.
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 7:36:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Demordrah:

Originally Posted By InheritedAnArsenal:
I guess I just don't want to be one of those gun nuts with enough hardware to start my own cult... hr


The problem with having that much hardware is .... ?  There's nothing wrong with liking and owning a boatload of firearms, despite what the bedwetters and soccer moms will tell you.



I know.  I was just trying to get a rise out of people.  
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 12:57:42 AM EDT
You're a member on ARFcom


Keep both.
Link Posted: 10/8/2005 8:27:09 PM EDT
If at all possible, keep them all.

The sentimental value alone makes the guns worth more than their market value, in my opinion.

I have a couple of inherited guns that don't necessarily suit my taste in weapons, but I would never dream of selling them.  They are a part of someone who will never be with me again.  One day, I will pass them on to my daughter, and hopefully she will feel the same.
Link Posted: 10/11/2005 9:33:18 AM EDT
I've decided to keep the pistols I have so far.  There might be something later on that I'm willing to part w/, but the 4 pistols I have so far (Daly 1911, H&K USP 40, and the two 45 revolvers) are keepers.
Link Posted: 10/12/2005 12:53:10 PM EDT
I have two model 25s, one is a 45ACP model and the other is a 45LC model.

There are few things more "right" than an S&W chambered for 45.     Reason being is they are chambered on the largest frame that S&W makes, the N-frame which has a LONG tradition of being reserved for some of the finest guns S&W has ever made.     The weight of the N-frame combined with the mild manners of the 45ACP and 45LC make for one hell of a pleasant shooting gun.

Top Top