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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 6/1/2003 7:17:10 PM EDT
i have a usp .40 and was advised that not releasing the slide on an empty chamber would increase the life of the pistol and that it was bad to do otherwise. instead, ride the slide forward slowly with the other hand.

this is something i had not heard or read before and couldn't find any mention of it in the usp manual. when i checked the web, i found several references to the "problem" but they all seemed to apply to the 1911 and custom trigger jobs.

how damaging can this be to a pistol and is it a problem with all designs?
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 7:23:45 PM EDT
You won't hurt an HK or any other modern auto for that matter.

It's part of malfuntion clearing drills for certain malfuntions. The one thing that one of my instructors pointed out is that one of his students was in the habit of using the slide stop to release the slide. (rather than just grabbing the slide and going)

Anyway, after years of doing this he rounded the notch in the slide to the point that it would no longer engage.
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 7:25:49 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 7:29:42 PM EDT
Semi Auto pistols are designed to strip a cartridge from the mag as the slide goes into battery. This stripping of the cartridge acts to slow the momentum of the slide and soften the
the impact of the slide locking into place.

On 1911's letting a slide slam home empty may result is a cracked frame at the slide stop holes. I imagine that it's not good for any weapon.

Neither is slamming or flipping shut the cylinder of a DA revolver.
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 7:34:32 PM EDT
Im going to have to respectfully disagree SGB. Dropping a slide on an empty chamber on a 1911 will batter the sear engagement surfaces and ruin a trigger job. Ive yet to hear of it leading to frame cracks, especially considering there are pistols in use in some military units with 70,000+ rounds through them with no frame cracking.
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 8:03:16 PM EDT
As long as it's respectful


On 1911's letting a slide slam home empty may{not will} result is a cracked frame at the slide stop holes. I imagine that it's not good for any weapon



Respectfully Lumpy196 I have seen stress cracks at the slide stop hole on a 1911. The owner was fond of dropping the slide home empty. In all fairness I don't know for positive that this was the cause,(it was an essex frame with many thousands of rounds down spout) but it seems logical to believe it may well have contributed to the condition.
Link Posted: 6/1/2003 9:37:51 PM EDT
I am in the habit of always grasping the slide and riding it down anyway whenever I am releasing it on an empty chamber. While I am not sure it's necessary to reduce wear and damage, I often do it in order to keep the gun quiet. Sometimes you don't want to alarm your company while cleaning the guns. There's nearly always someone around here anyway and many of my friends I want nowhere near my firearms! LOL.
Link Posted: 6/2/2003 12:34:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SGB:
As long as it's respectful



It's a rare moment, go with it SGB. LOL.
Link Posted: 6/2/2003 2:36:08 AM EDT
I didn't know that using the slide lock to drop the slide rounded anything off.

*makes mental note to stop doing that*

Thanks!

Speaking of slides slamming shut. If it's dark, you're told to stick your finger in the chamber to make sure that it's clear. Anyone ever had the slide accidently slam shut while doing this? With a pistol, I bet it would hurt. With an AR, I think that it might just tear a big hold in your flesh...
Link Posted: 6/2/2003 5:52:40 AM EDT
The empty chamber thing is a known problem with the 1911, but not because it damages the gun. The only logic I heard to this effect was that it messes up a good trigger pull in the gun. (Ed Brown said this in an article I read)

I do not drop on an empty chamber on my Les Baer 1911, but I do it on my other guns. I don't do it several dozen times a day every day. Doing it that much can cause a problem.

I mainly do it when I am practicing malf clearance and mag changes. I have experienced only a broken firing pin in my Beretta 92FS and that gun was bought (well) used and I dry fired the heck out of it.
Link Posted: 6/2/2003 7:01:06 AM EDT
Dropping the slide on an empty chamber is one of those gray areas as far as I'm concerned.

Some say it won't hurt the gun, some say it will eventually. I think it depends on the gun (kind of like dry firing).

My take on it: it's no more trouble to let the slide down easy, so why risk a problem? I've just cultivated the habit of easing the slide down on every auto I handle, especially when the gun in question belongs to someone else.

Folks can get real touchy about what they see as someone abusing their gun.
Link Posted: 6/2/2003 7:43:48 AM EDT
I just don't do it often, at best, metal slamming together over the long term can't be good for it.
I feel I would rather wear it out by firing than playing with it.
That's my opinion and I'm stickin' to it!
Link Posted: 6/2/2003 4:23:15 PM EDT
I would never do it to someone elses weapon, but I make sure I NEVER get in the habit of pussy footing my defense weapons. I try to maintain the habit of quick and decisive manipulation during practice so the same thing happens in a high stress situation.

Link Posted: 6/2/2003 7:04:30 PM EDT
Droping the slide on an empty 1911 makes quite a clash. When chambering a round, as it was designed to do, it opperates more quietly. What is all the unnecessary noise/energy tell you?
Link Posted: 6/2/2003 7:08:47 PM EDT
This is not a flame, but He's asking about an HK USP.
Link Posted: 6/4/2003 10:02:41 AM EDT
yea..i don't really have much experience with the 1911. and the usp doesn't sound as if it's undergoing any serious damage when i've dropped the slide. plus, it seemed as if firing a round would create far more force than anything i could do manually. (though it is directed differently.)

either way, from what you guys have written, it sounds as if i don't need to worry too much that i've damaged the gun. it's probably fine. but i do like the idea of riding down the slide on other people's guns. and will likely start doing it on my own jsut to get into the habit. it doesn't seem as if there would be any reason not to.
Link Posted: 6/4/2003 11:36:03 AM EDT
In a preciscion tuned 1911A1 target pistol it MIGHT hurt something.

But since 1911, every military watch stander armed with this pistol used the slide release to drop the slide on an empty chamber at the change of the guard.

Even the "Manual of Arms" for the 1911A1 calls for the slide release to be used to drop the slide after "Inspection Arms".

I would think that in that pistol's long history, there would have been an advisory notice if that had been a problem. If we had a nickle for every slide dropped on an empty 1911 chambers, we would all be millionaires. If it caused any damage, Colt would still be prosperous.

Metallurgy has come a long way since 1911.

My .45 ACP Colts, USP, Sig and P9S have no caveats on dropping the slide on an empty chamber in the instruction manuals.

The unusual and dangerous ritual of pulling the 1911 trigger to unload the sear while releasing the slide is another strange custom waiting for an AD and a DA soon afterwards.

Link Posted: 6/4/2003 2:44:35 PM EDT
I know on stock 1911's and other pistols it doesn't hurt them because my friends do it all the time but it is impossible for me too drop the slide on a empty chamber I just cannot do it and when someone else does it I cringe.

Yeah I am weird, thats what happens when something is drilled into your brain.
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 9:28:08 AM EDT
I sure don't know most of you guys are getting your info but, only a qualified pistol smith should close a slide on an empty chamber . Doing so routinely will lead to sear and hammer problems. If you do it on a regular basis you are looking for trouble. Pretty soon your hammer will start following your slide and not stay in the cocked position. Have fun and play Don Johnson if you want but please not with my guns OK.

All kidding aside it will cause hammer follow and that will not only be costly but very unsafe.

Gary
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 10:02:52 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/5/2003 10:04:33 AM EDT by SP10]
I have always gently closed my 1911 slides on an empty chamber after a gunshop owner winced and gently corrected me. His take on the subject also leaned towards possible sear/trigger damage.

My father-in-law is a Korean war vet. He has been there/done that, and credits having a 1911 close at hand to saving his life on at least 2 occasions. He shot competitively with the .45 while a marine and after. He was sending 230 gr ball down range long before I was born. He continued to drop the slide on my empty .45s until I finally decided to mention that doing so "may" cause damage. Sounded reasonable to him.

Heh, kinda hard to tell if the trigger job was ruined on my 80 series Colts
Link Posted: 6/7/2003 5:14:11 PM EDT
we ain't the only ones discussing this subject

1911 forums

thehighroad
Link Posted: 6/7/2003 6:23:25 PM EDT
Sounds like bullsh-t. I have never seen evidence; statistical or anecdotal that would indicate a problem. It would seem that an extra strong recoil spring would have the same effect on a loaded gun as a normal spring on an unloaded gun.

Link Posted: 6/8/2003 9:03:44 AM EDT
Off topic a bit...I have seen some at the range baby the slide home to chamber a round...that's when you should let it fly.
Then they think they had a misfeed!
Link Posted: 6/9/2003 7:12:03 AM EDT
I LOVE the sound it makes
Link Posted: 6/9/2003 7:40:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Johnphin:
If it's dark, you're told to stick your finger in the chamber to make sure that it's clear. Anyone ever had the slide accidently slam shut while doing this? With a pistol, I bet it would hurt. With an AR, I think that it might just tear a big hold in your flesh...



If you put the Enbloc clip in a garand, and you arnet quick about it:
M1 THUMB!

Now,That hurts!

Link Posted: 6/9/2003 7:43:00 AM EDT
The owners manual for my Kimber says, Never drop the slde on an empty chamber, it loosens the frame to slide fit.
They also say dont "thumb" the hammer down, it can hurt the sear.
(Maybe it can, but I really think they tell you this, so they dont get sued for your ND.)
Link Posted: 6/9/2003 11:00:07 PM EDT
Regardless of your take on the issue as to whether it causes any particular damage or not; I have always thought of it as bad etiquette to drop the slide on empty with someone elses weapon.

Other views?
Link Posted: 6/10/2003 1:41:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By desertmoon:
Regardless of your take on the issue as to whether it causes any particular damage or not; I have always thought of it as bad etiquette to drop the slide on empty with someone elses weapon.

Other views?



I agree! I bought a Colt Cowboy and I was showing it to my brother. He looked at it and said, "Hey watch this" and started to try to fan it. I got it from him before he could start fanning it. I am still amazed he tried to do it.
Link Posted: 6/10/2003 1:55:09 PM EDT
Messed up both my triggers on my Spingfield 1911's.
Competent gunsmith could only figure it came from my dry firing practices and my bad habit of releasing the slide onto empty chambers constantly.
If you do anything too much it may hurt your gun.
Link Posted: 6/11/2003 2:15:49 PM EDT
maybe this is off topic, but the thing that I heard was bad was loading a round in the chamber through the top and releasing the slide. I heard this will mess up your extractor because it was designed to slide in through the bottom and not slam over the rim of the cartridge. Is it possible they got the idea from this. Don't do it on other peoples guns and they shouldn't do it to yours. I for one do it all the time to practice tactical reloads.
Link Posted: 6/11/2003 2:26:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NoCompromise:
maybe this is off topic, but the thing that I heard was bad was loading a round in the chamber through the top and releasing the slide. I heard this will mess up your extractor because it was designed to slide in through the bottom and not slam over the rim of the cartridge. Is it possible they got the idea from this. Don't do it on other peoples guns and they shouldn't do it to yours. I for one do it all the time to practice tactical reloads.



I have heard that also.
Link Posted: 6/11/2003 8:15:00 PM EDT

slamming or flipping shut the cylinder of a DA revolver


I cannot STAND it when people do that!
Link Posted: 6/11/2003 9:13:43 PM EDT
Dropping the slide on an empty semi auto, especially one with a polymer frame or alloy frame, does seem like it would cause damage at some point. It's really amazing what a pistol goes through when fired with live ammunition though too. It always seems like there is a lot of stress on the slide stop pin (can't think of another name for it right now)on most pistols. I realize the engineers design things to work right, but it's neat how things work and how long some pistols can last with all the wear and tear involved.
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