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9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 10/25/2005 3:52:48 PM EDT
im sure that a thread of this type has come up in the past but i did a search and cant find anything about it. is it possible to change a colt series 80 pistol into a series 70? likewise with the kimbers?
Link Posted: 10/25/2005 3:58:23 PM EDT
You can pull the parts and plug the holes. Have a gunsmith do a trigger job and throw in the proper parts wile he is at it, they are in Brownells.
Link Posted: 10/25/2005 4:20:09 PM EDT
Yes, easy to do. You don't need to fill any holes. Take off the slide, remove firing pin stop and firing pin. Now you can take out the plunger and spring. Reassemble with an overpower firing pin return spring (Wolffe, Midway, etc.) to prevent inertia firing pin strike if dropped. Next, remove your thumb safety and hammer pin, then remove the plunger lever and reassemble. (If you never did this you might need help). I would reinstall the parts if you ever sell the gun. Also, getting a smith to do a trigger job now will make it worthwhile, otherwise, probably not worth the trouble. Good luck!
Link Posted: 11/25/2005 6:20:30 AM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 11/25/2005 6:57:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TARFU:
Yes, easy to do. You don't need to fill any holes. Take off the slide, remove firing pin stop and firing pin. Now you can take out the plunger and spring. Reassemble with an overpower firing pin return spring (Wolffe, Midway, etc.) to prevent inertia firing pin strike if dropped. Next, remove your thumb safety and hammer pin, then remove the plunger lever and reassemble. (If you never did this you might need help). I would reinstall the parts if you ever sell the gun. Also, getting a smith to do a trigger job now will make it worthwhile, otherwise, probably not worth the trouble. Good luck!




Won't the sear walk itself out of position without a filler plate?
Link Posted: 11/25/2005 7:17:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TARFU:
Yes, easy to do. You don't need to fill any holes. Take off the slide, remove firing pin stop and firing pin. Now you can take out the plunger and spring. Reassemble with an overpower firing pin return spring (Wolffe, Midway, etc.) to prevent inertia firing pin strike if dropped. Next, remove your thumb safety and hammer pin, then remove the plunger lever and reassemble. (If you never did this you might need help). I would reinstall the parts if you ever sell the gun. Also, getting a smith to do a trigger job now will make it worthwhile, otherwise, probably not worth the trouble. Good luck!

Myself, I would fill the holes to avoid future problems with crud build up that could cause problems! YMMV
Link Posted: 11/25/2005 7:57:59 AM EDT
What can you use to fill the hole and does anyone sell a filler plate?
Link Posted: 11/25/2005 8:02:44 AM EDT
I'd just leave it Series 80! What's the prob, Rob?
Link Posted: 11/25/2005 8:23:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2006 3:38:55 AM EDT by hobbs5624]
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Link Posted: 11/25/2005 9:08:34 AM EDT
Good write up.
Link Posted: 11/25/2005 9:20:04 AM EDT

Originally Posted By hobbs5624:
...snip !.... thanks for putting up with me.



We "put up with you" because you know what you are talking about. Keep bothering us.

Link Posted: 11/25/2005 9:34:52 AM EDT
Hobbs, Thanks for the info.

That cleared up a lot. Actually opened my eyes up to some important life altering details that never even crossed my mind.

BTW read it twice
Link Posted: 11/25/2005 11:41:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2006 3:39:05 AM EDT by hobbs5624]
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Link Posted: 11/25/2005 5:22:17 PM EDT
As usual, Hobbs pretty much hit the nail on the head and drove it clean in....all in one fell swoop.

I've been carrying and using 1911's since I was a fairly wee lad and I have owned a few Colt Series 80 guns over the years. I've also kept my ear to the floor about the Series 80 safety and from what I have gleaned, the S80 safety is no more or less prone to malfunction than any other part in any decent 1911 might be. Generally, any S80 safety malfunction I have heard about has been due to a bad component far and above more than any error in design. I have never had an S80 safety issue and nor have my friends who carry Series 80 guns in the line of duty. It doesn't mean one might not have an issue....but it is very unlikely.
Link Posted: 11/25/2005 6:36:17 PM EDT
Crud does not build up in the hole and the sear cannot walk. I agree, never alter any factory safety on a carry/defense gun. But, in a dedicated competition gun, eliminating the series 80 safety will noticably improve your tuned trigger by removing weight and stacking. There is only so much even a good smith can do with the series 80. Use othe overpower firing pin spring and the gun will not go off if you drop it.
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 11:55:36 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/27/2005 11:56:02 AM EDT by MonkeyGrip]
Here's a good step-by-step account with photos of series 80 parts replacement with filler plate, along with reason why you might want to do it:

freepatriot.com/removeseries80.php
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 12:48:26 PM EDT
I've had a few discussions, regarding this and similiar subjects, with a friend of mine who is a prosecuting attorney for the District Attorney's office.

In a justified shooting, removing the components that are part of the series 80 system shouldn't be an issue. If you are lawfully exercising the use of deadly physical force, it doesn't matter what trigger pull weight is used, the type of sights on the gun, aftermarket grips, etc. The facts remain the same, to wit: your use of deadly physical force was reasonable, and necessary; you intended to use deadly physical force; and the gun discharged based on your intentional manipulation of the trigger.

What would matter is if the gun unintentionally discharges, or if your use of deadly physical force was unlawful. In these types of instances, then it could be claimed that your actions were reckless/careless.

Personally, if I am confident that the gun is safe to be carried/used without the Series 80 components, then I'd have no problem using it as a defensive weapon.
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