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4/22/2019 5:32:20 PM
Posted: 10/29/2004 10:23:43 AM EDT
Borrowed from my other thread:


Originally Posted By JimGA:
Glocks are a completely different thing.

Glocks are striker-fired, no hammers for double/single action. Every pull is the same at 5lb (stock..it's changeable by an armorer).



Is there a link to the info or would someone explain in simple terms how the "striker-fired" system operates? Is Glock the only mfg using this firing system?

Link Posted: 10/29/2004 10:27:56 AM EDT
Striker fired means that the firing pin (striker) is spring loaded and when pulled rearward and released hits the primer vs. hammer fired where the firing pin is struck my a hammer to hit the primer.

glockmeister.com/safeties.shtml
Link Posted: 10/29/2004 10:34:22 AM EDT
Think of the trigger as pulling back on a slingshot and the pin as the projo. Easiest way I've found to explain it.
Link Posted: 10/29/2004 5:39:15 PM EDT
It sure is simple, it works, and simplies the design so you don't need an external hammer and a bunch of other parts. Ingenious!
Link Posted: 10/30/2004 7:55:13 AM EDT
OK, I think I get it. So the pressure on the trigger pull is from loading the spring, not cocking or releasing a hammer that doesn't exist. That's why the pull is the same every time since there is no hammer movement. Am I following correctly?

Is this the same type of striker system that S.A. is calling their USA system? Or is Glock superior/different than that one?
Link Posted: 10/30/2004 8:17:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BH1:
OK, I think I get it. So the pressure on the trigger pull is from loading the spring, not cocking or releasing a hammer that doesn't exist. That's why the pull is the same every time since there is no hammer movement. Am I following correctly?

Is this the same type of striker system that S.A. is calling their USA system? Or is Glock superior/different than that one?



The trigger pull weight is from the striker (firing pin spring), trigger spring and disconnector type in the Glock. The trigger pull can be lightened or made heavier by changing any or all of these parts. A Glocks firing pin spring is pulled rearward very slightly (about 20%) when a round is chambered and it's 'cocked' ready to fire. The biggest difference the Glock has to the SA is that the SA has a grip safety thats not really needed but makes some people feel safer I guess.
Link Posted: 10/31/2004 4:25:00 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/31/2004 4:27:33 AM EDT by Iceshark03]

Originally Posted By BH1:
OK, I think I get it. So the pressure on the trigger pull is from loading the spring, not cocking or releasing a hammer that doesn't exist. That's why the pull is the same every time since there is no hammer movement. Am I following correctly?

Is this the same type of striker system that S.A. is calling their USA system? Or is Glock superior/different than that one?



Glock trigger has to pull the firing pin back most of the way before releasing it (80% of the way I think). Springfield Armory's XD already has the firing pin pulled back. The trigger pull merely releases the firing pin.

Both use the same system. Springfield has 1 additional safety and the only difference is the position of the firing pin before pulling the trigger.
Link Posted: 10/31/2004 1:26:01 PM EDT
Thanks guys. I appreciate the help. I'm sure I'll have more questions for you before to long.
Link Posted: 10/31/2004 4:54:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Iceshark03:
Glock trigger has to pull the firing pin back most of the way before releasing it (80% of the way I think). Springfield Armory's XD already has the firing pin pulled back. The trigger pull merely releases the firing pin.



So if the XD's firing pin happens to be accidentally released somehow, the gun will fire, whereas a Glock won't?
Link Posted: 11/1/2004 4:06:14 AM EDT

Originally Posted By anon23bf:

Originally Posted By Iceshark03:
Glock trigger has to pull the firing pin back most of the way before releasing it (80% of the way I think). Springfield Armory's XD already has the firing pin pulled back. The trigger pull merely releases the firing pin.



So if the XD's firing pin happens to be accidentally released somehow, the gun will fire, whereas a Glock won't?



I think it can't fire if dropped because of the firing pin safety, just like on a Glock, Beretta or SIG. The trigger has to be pulled to release it.
Link Posted: 11/1/2004 7:35:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By anon23bf:


So if the XD's firing pin happens to be accidentally released somehow, the gun will fire, whereas a Glock won't?



It is in theory easier for the (single action) HS2000 to have a mechanical failure discharge because the striker is cocked when loaded. The Glock is double action and the firing pin is only under enough force to fire when the trigger is pulled.


The HS200 grip safety only blocks the sear. There is a striker block incorporated into the trigger. Also there is a Glock type safety in the trigger.

For the HS2000 to fire from mechanical failure the striker safety and the sear would both have to fail. Because it is not cocked (and also has a striker safety) the only way a Glock should fire from mechanical failure is for a police officer to be giving a demonstration on gun safety to a classroom full of children.
Link Posted: 11/1/2004 7:43:09 AM EDT
Here is how it works:

You pull the trigger and it goes kB! and the plastic flies like confetti.

Just kidding. Just kidding.

Link Posted: 11/1/2004 7:47:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By tfod:

Originally Posted By anon23bf:


So if the XD's firing pin happens to be accidentally released somehow, the gun will fire, whereas a Glock won't?



Because it is not cocked (and also has a striker safety) the only way a Glock should fire from mechanical failure is for a police officer to be giving a demonstration on gun safety to a classroom full of children.





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