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Posted: 1/15/2006 7:19:12 AM EDT
Hi guys can a semi auto be cleaned without taking it apart? thanks for input
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 7:59:04 AM EDT
To some extent. The best way to do that is to hose it out with some sort of pressurized solvent such as Gunscrubber or brake cleaner. Dry it off with compressed air, which will help blow some of the dirt out of it.

Then spray it down with oil, hit it with compressed air again, then wipe off the exterior.

The barrel can be cleaned without removal by using patches and a cleaning rod.

It won't be 100% clean but it will usually be enough to get the gun going again for another 1000 rounds or so.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 1:27:06 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 5:59:02 AM EDT
Hi guys sounds like good advice thanks for the help charlie
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 6:08:33 AM EDT
Why do you ask?

Do you mean cleaning in the field? Are you affraid to take it apart?
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 9:09:21 PM EDT
hi well i am kind of hesitant to dismantle it because the slide is so hard to move I have a hard time re assembling it and thanks
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 9:28:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By bandino:
hi well i am kind of hesitant to dismantle it because the slide is so hard to move I have a hard time re assembling it and thanks



Thats an understandable concern but you will one day HAVE to take it apart so you might as well suck it up and take the damn thing apart. The only way you get good at anything is practice. Take the damn thing apart and clean it correctly. I'm not bashing the previously posted quick clean but in time if you keep doing that it will cause malfunctions and a malfunctioning firearm is not safe or reliable. If you can not reassemble it yourself ask a friend for help (if you can't pull the slide back and insert the pin alone) there is no shame in asking for help. I needed help taking apart my USP tactical the first and second time now I can do it with my eyes closed or in the dark. For a quick clean do what was said above but you need to know how to tear down and reassemble that firearm. If its really an issue then you can pay your local range like $30 to clean it for you(some places have this service available) or maybe you should trade for a wheel gun. I'm not bashing you please don't take it that way. Good Luck. If you can tell us what you're having trouble with maybe we can provide you with some tricks.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 8:14:52 AM EDT
Dear MR. Murphy I do have two wheel Guns a model !9 Sand W 357 4in barrel and a detective special snub nosed 38 but I wanted to get a semi auto so i chose the champion thanks charlie
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 8:33:26 AM EDT
I agree with whats been said so far. But, to add to it I make prolific use of Q-tips to clean out the majority of the crud before I spray things down with a spray gun cleaner and then wipe again with more Q tips or patches. So, I'd suggest picking up some Q tips as they do a good job.

Also boresnakes are good for a quick clean as well. They won't get things as clean as using a rod and a brush with some sort of solvent, but it will get bulk of the mung in your barrel out fairly quickly.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 8:36:53 AM EDT
1911 are easy to field strip. Not as easy as a Glock but still easy. Practice, practice, practice
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 11:02:58 AM EDT
I do not recommend cleaning your gun while it is assembled. Field-stripping the gun can be a little intimidating to a new 1911 owner but after a little practice it will become old hat. I distinctly remember 9 years ago making a HELP call to a friend for advice and instructions.

When I disassemble mine, I remove the slide with the recoil spring assembly intact. Put the beavertail in the joint between your thumb and index finger. Wrap your fingers over the rear sight and ejection port and squeeze the slide back out of battery. You may have to use your off hand to cheat the slide back a little. This position/technique will give you decent leverage to hold the slide back while you push out the slide stop. Then just ease the slide forward using your off hand to wrap completely under the slide as it comes off. This will help trap the recoil assembly from flying across the room.

When reassembling the gun leave the plug out and the bushing installed 90 degrees to the ejection-port side of the gun. Install the recoil rod and spring as normal, with the spring poking out from the muzzle end of the slide, past the muzzle. Now install the slide assembly onto the frame.

Next, install the slide lock through the frame, barrel link, and slide notch. Be careful. Until you get the hang of it it is easy to slip and "idiot-scratch" the frame and slide. Until I got the hang of it, I put a business card on the frame to act as a scratch-guard. The recoil plug is out so there should be no tension on the recoil spring at all.

Take the little orange plastic safety-plug do-hickey (which seems to come with every gun) and put it in the chamber. This keeps the pistol out-of-battery and I'll explain why to do this later.

Now place the recoil plug onto the recoil spring. With the gun on end, with muzzle pointing up, install the plug and turn the bushing to trap the plug. Some people find the easy to do with bare hands and some people prefer to press it in using the flat of a (plastic) bushing wrench. Be careful that the spring and plug don't slip and spring up into your face. It happens.

The reason I use the safety-plug is that with a match barrel and bushing the fit between the bushing and muzzle is pretty snug. If you take the gun out-of-battery the barrel moves forward slightly to a looser-fit area. Turning the bushing is easier. If you do not have a snug fit between your bushing and muzzle, this isn't really a concern. This may be an unnecessary step/hint, but I figured I'd throw it out there.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 12:23:44 PM EDT
Jump right in! The first thing I did when I brought my 1911 home was detail strip it. I had it back together in just a few minutes.
Of course it helped that I had read up on it extensively for the few months leading up to it.

And as soon as I had it together, I field stripped it with my eyes closed. I wanted to know that gun backwards and forwards.
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 4:01:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Walt175:
Jump right in! The first thing I did when I brought my 1911 home was detail strip it. I had it back together in just a few minutes.
Of course it helped that I had read up on it extensively for the few months leading up to it.

And as soon as I had it together, I field stripped it with my eyes closed. I wanted to know that gun backwards and forwards.





Me and you, we are like the same people. no?

The same is true for me.
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