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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 1/27/2006 10:40:39 AM EDT
There's no outdoor gun ranges around here (well there is, you just gotta drive so fucking far), mostly indoor ones.

I am very concerned about lead exposure. Is there some kind of mask I can buy outside that'll protect me from lead exposure at the range? If there is, price isn't an issue for me. My health comes first.

Thank you all.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 10:43:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2006 10:43:51 AM EDT by TheRedHorseman]
you California guys are paranoid.(but then again, everything is known to the state of california to cause cancer....)


how about an M40 or MCU-2 protective mask and a fresh C2A1 canister?

hell while you're at it, a JSLIST suit, boots and gloves. MOPP-4 baby!
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 10:43:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Fglocker_Plz:
There's no outdoor gun ranges around here (well there is, you just gotta drive so fucking far), mostly indoor ones.

I am very concerned about lead exposure. Is there some kind of mask I can buy outside that'll protect me from lead exposure at the range? If there is, price isn't an issue for me. My health comes first.

Thank you all.





Link Posted: 1/27/2006 10:53:20 AM EDT
A rated disposable particulate mask wil be effective against lead vapors/fumes. They run about $10 each for a decent model with an exhale valve.
Unless the indoor range has very poor air flow, the lead and other smoke products should be heading down range more than well enough.
Lead exposure from weapon cleaning is liable to be a bigger problem.
Take very fine lead particles, add cleaning solvents, get on hands.
Latex gloves are pretty useless against any petroleum based items. Nitrile is much better.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 10:53:53 AM EDT
This is how I typically go to the indoor ranges around here.



You can't be too careful. Lead will kill you.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 10:59:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Ranger_SXT:
This is how I typically go to the indoor ranges around here.

www.guzu.cz/images2002/ochranne_masky.jpg

You can't be too careful. Lead will kill you.



especially in the state of California, you might need to keep any lead containing projectiles outside in a hermetically sealed bunker just to be safe!
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 1:23:35 PM EDT
You might not even have to go that far...

I'd think a carpenters mask would catch the bulk of any particles.... a canister mask like painters use would just be extra insurance....

IMO you only live once and a properly ventilated indoor range (I'd think indoor ranges in Cali would be better than most due to their laws on everything else under the sun) should be more than enough to prevent substantial lead exposure...

If you're really worried always shoot jacketed bullets, As suggested above clean with nitrile gloves in a well venthilated area.. buy factory ammo.

Lead is one of the heaviest metals out there... it's not as easy for it to become airborne as it is for it to get on your skin and be absorbed that way.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 2:53:26 PM EDT
and when you are done shooting be sure to wash hands and face and lower arms.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 7:31:35 PM EDT
Be sure to file an environmental impact statement for each round fired.

G
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 8:37:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By aaronrb204:
and when you are done shooting be sure to wash hands and face and lower arms.


And rinse out your mouth.


Personally, unless you are around the range for extended periods(like an employee), I don't you need to worry about it. My now closed indoor range, Calif EPA came and examined the place and took air samples etc and everything was good, BUT the employees had lead in their blood that was more than 10 times the limited. So the employees were told not to go in the shooting area unless absolutely necessary.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 9:58:13 PM EDT
Contrary to what you might think, a well-designed and properly maintained indoor range will do a much better job of protecting you from lead exposure than an outdoor range. This is since an indoor range can be sealed up, controlled, and cleaned so easily.

You don’t need a mask unless you’re, say, cleaning out the bullet trap or something like that. Then you defiantly need one with a HEPA filter.

Don’t smoke, eat or drink at the range. Wash your hands and face with cool water following any exposure to lead.

And if you’re really concerned (or say have kids or a pregnant wife at home), change clothes when you get home and wash your range clothes by themselves in the washer.

You should be fine.

You can get lead test kits and lead removing soap (called d-Lead, IIRC) from Brownells if you want (I use the soap all the time at work).
Link Posted: 1/28/2006 4:59:42 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Fglocker_Plz:
There's no outdoor gun ranges around here (well there is, you just gotta drive so fucking far), mostly indoor ones.

I am very concerned about lead exposure. Is there some kind of mask I can buy outside that'll protect me from lead exposure at the range? If there is, price isn't an issue for me. My health comes first.

Thank you all.



I didn't think I'd chime in here until I read some of the posts. 199 posted some good info. Wear a cap/hat. Don't eat, drink, or do much of anything that you don't have to at the range. Wash your face and hands asap with cold water then wash up and change when you get home. Shoot full jacketed ammo although this doesn't do much good if the guy next to you blasts lead. Try to shoot when the range isn't busy or better yet when you are the only one.

I remember 20 years ago reading an article about this and the author saying he wouldn't shoot indoors without a respirator/mask of some kind. I haven't given it much thought as I don't shoot much indoors. Recently however, some people I know that shot indoor IDPA matches had dangerously high levels. That was about 6 months ago and one individual is still undergoing treatment. This is at a public indoor range.

Choose a good clean, well ventilated range. Doesn't hurt to ask questions about how they maintain it or how they can guarentee the air quality. Google the shooting lead problem. When the bunch I shoot with were diagnosed, we found all kinds of similar info on Al Gore's www.
Link Posted: 1/28/2006 5:29:25 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/28/2006 8:55:41 AM EDT
"Shoot full jacketed ammo..."

Most of the lead actually comes from the primer compound. Lead styphnate is the primary sensitive material and releases hot lead vapor that is very reactive.
Link Posted: 1/28/2006 12:41:18 PM EDT
The first step I would take it get my blood tested for lead. Unless you have an elevated BLL (blood lead level), you don't need to take any precautions other than good hygene. I shoot bullseye and high power, and spend alot of time on both indoor and outdoor ranges. My BLL is 7. If you cant fight the need for a resporator, Home Depot has what you need. At the most you will need a half face unit with HEPA filters. There is a specific lead filter, but the standard HEPA is also approved for lead. I have 12 years of environmental consulting experience so feel free to ask questions if you need any other info.



Originally Posted By Fglocker_Plz:
I am very concerned about lead exposure. Is there some kind of mask I can buy outside that'll protect me from lead exposure at the range? If there is, price isn't an issue for me. My health comes first.

Thank you all.

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