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Posted: 10/1/2004 6:36:39 AM EST
I took my G30 out yesterday and couldn't hit a damn thing! Everything was low. I got 9 of 10 on paper when I was only 8.5 yards away, and that was because I raised the barrel so that I couldn't actually see the target when I shot and the sights were no where near in line with each other. I don't think I'm flinching much if at all. I have put several hundred rounds through it before and was never this bad. It was really windy but it was coming from the side so I doubt that was much a factor. Anyone have any ideas or do I just suck that much?
Link Posted: 10/1/2004 6:47:32 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/1/2004 6:48:23 AM EST by gotm4]
Do some dry fire practice, practice holding the trigger back between shots and only let it up enough until it resets. You can do this in dry fire too, keeping the trigger back and racking the slide then slowly letting up on the trigger until it resets.
Link Posted: 10/1/2004 6:47:52 AM EST
Keep your wrist straight, real tight grip on the gun, and try a very slow trigger pull (make sure you are not trying to anticipate the shot).
Link Posted: 10/1/2004 6:50:50 AM EST
You might try bracing the weapon on a rest or having someone else shoot it to see if it's you or the gun.
Link Posted: 10/1/2004 10:21:36 AM EST
Youi might want to try and hold it sideways, you know, pimp-style! Then you won't be low, just off to the left!
Link Posted: 10/1/2004 10:27:36 AM EST

Originally Posted By Spartan24:
Youi might want to try and hold it sideways, you know, pimp-style! Then you won't be low, just off to the left!



But if you do that and dive at the same time you will never miss.
Link Posted: 10/1/2004 5:13:34 PM EST

Originally Posted By wedge1082:

Originally Posted By Spartan24:
Youi might want to try and hold it sideways, you know, pimp-style! Then you won't be low, just off to the left!



But if you do that and dive at the same time you will never miss.



SHHHHHHH! That's my IDPA secret!
Link Posted: 10/1/2004 10:10:08 PM EST
The way I've always shot my Glocks
is, if you're right handed, place your hand as far up as it
can go on the handle, firm right hand grip like you're
shaking someone's hand, lock the wrist, push slightly forward,
left hand covers the right hand, fingers over fingers, thumb over thumb,
left grip is slightly tighter than the right grip, pushing slightly back into yourself,
trigger finger slowly pulls STRAIGHT back in one continuous movement,
don't pull the trigger off to the left or right, just straight back, don't feel for the
break, just let it happen. The front sight should be totally motionless when the striker
releases when you're dry firing.
I shoot ok that way.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 12:52:17 AM EST
You're flinching, try some dry fire practice at home and place a dime on the top of the slide behind the front sight when pressing the trigger. Keep the dime from falling and the front sight from dropping out of sight. When you go to the range have someone load a round in the chamber or leave it empty and hand you the pistol, that way the shooter doesn't know if its loaded or not. Remember gun safety while handling the firearm. Your shot attempts are the same whether the gun goes off or not. To cure the flinch the key is trigger "presses" and less shotting live rounds. You need quality not quantity. Good luck.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 1:01:54 AM EST
It is the gun. Get rid of it and get a 1911A1
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 1:37:22 AM EST

Originally Posted By Legend:
You're flinching, try some dry fire practice at home and place a dime on the top of the slide behind the front sight when pressing the trigger. Keep the dime from falling and the front sight from dropping out of sight. When you go to the range have someone load a round in the chamber or leave it empty and hand you the pistol, that way the shooter doesn't know if its loaded or not. Remember gun safety while handling the firearm. Your shot attempts are the same whether the gun goes off or not. To cure the flinch the key is trigger "presses" and less shotting live rounds. You need quality not quantity. Good luck.



+1

I might add that I find I shoot my Glocks best if I treat them more as a DA than trying to press with the center of the first pad of my trigger finger as I do with, say, a 1911. I put more finger on the trigger..almost to the break between the first and second pads...and sort of "ooch" it off of the sear. (Yeah, "ooch" is a technical term but hopefully you know what I mean!) I also find that being very careful to feel the trigger reset and starting the next shot from there is extremely helpful, as is something called "follow through", which, when boiled down means making sure to try and keep the sights on the target until AFTER the shot is fired. Yes, the recoil will move them, but think in terms of doing this for every shot...trust me, it is very important.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 10:39:44 AM EST
Thanks for all the suggestions (except maddog), I will give them all a try and hopefully get better.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 11:18:59 AM EST

Originally Posted By 7_62_54:
Thanks for all the suggestions (except maddog), I will give them all a try and hopefully get better.


Man, I always get left out
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 11:26:59 AM EST
Get some dummy rounds from Brownells, I think they're called safety trainers, and have a friend load one or two in your mag interspersed with live rounds. I bet you've got a vicious flinch. This will show you what's happening. Practice dry fire and the ball-and-dummy drills.
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 5:26:59 AM EST
Suck it up maddog.
vojta: thanks for that idea. I think (no offense to the others) it is the best idea yet. I am rock steady with snap caps as I have practiced with them more than anything else but must flinch with live rounds.
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 1:24:05 PM EST
I sometimes have a problem with my Glocks with shooting low.
I know it sounds dumb, but when really getting into it I find that I'm trying to see the target OVER the front dot.
I think the sub-conscious wants to see the whole target, and causes me to move the front dot down, as to not block out the view.
Link Posted: 10/6/2004 6:05:21 AM EST
you're pushing. You're expecting the shot. Two of the best ways i have found to over come pushing with my students is double taps and one hand shooting. If you want to see what you're doing yourself, do this. load a mad but every 2-3 rounds add a snap cap. When the snap cap is chambered and you roll the trigger and you get no BANG, you'll see what you're doing wrong b/c you will still do the exact same thing. It's just easier to notice without the sound or recoil.

J
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