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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 3/22/2006 2:27:04 AM EDT
It's the middle of the winter....I'm bored...I need to shoot..... My neighbor suggested wax loads for in the basement shooting..... I've done some research...in 45 LC they sell brass that takes shotgun primers.... Anyone doing this... will the wax screw up my pistol.....???

thanks
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 2:56:36 AM EDT
Just need to scrub the wax out before using real ammo.

You can use regular brass and pistol primers, but you need to enlarge the flash hole or else the primers back out and tie up the cylinder.

Mark the brass so you do not use it for real loads with the enlarged flash holes.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 3:22:09 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ar-wrench:
Just need to scrub the wax out before using real ammo.

You can use regular brass and pistol primers, but you need to enlarge the flash hole or else the primers back out and tie up the cylinder.

Mark the brass so you do not use it for real loads with the enlarged flash holes.



Thanks for the reply..... do you know how much I should drill out the flash holes....????

Link Posted: 3/22/2006 3:37:47 AM EDT
It has been 15 years since I did it, but IIRC 1/8 inch is about right. Try a few and see if the primers stay seated. Go bigger if you have to.

I got the info from an article years ago, in a normal round, the powder charge puts enough pressure on the case to keep the primer seated. Primer only in a case often starts to back out without the extra pressure.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 3:39:52 AM EDT
IIRC, Bill Jordan had some interesting information in his book on the wax rounds he used for demos and practice, might be worth checking his book out.

"No Secind Place Winner" by Willian Henry Jordan, good read IMO.

Mike
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 8:01:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/22/2006 8:02:35 AM EDT by warlord]
Personally, I wouldn't want to shoot anything in my basement, or anything near my living quarters. You will get lead contamination from the primer.

How about air/CO2 guns?
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 2:18:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By warlord:
Personally, I wouldn't want to shoot anything in my basement, or anything near my living quarters. You will get lead contamination from the primer.

How about air/CO2 guns?



???? Lead in the primer????

I would also look at the Speer plastic bullets and cases (Midway USA carries them). No waxy mess and bullets can be reused after catching them in a cardboard box/ trap.

I have used these in past in my .38. Just tape a target to a cardboard box stuffed with old newspapers.

Fun in the garage!

Link Posted: 3/23/2006 2:30:59 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/23/2006 2:31:46 PM EDT by Jetlag]

Originally Posted By Bubbatheredneck:
???? Lead in the primer????


You bet. That's why ranges have those fancy air conditioning units nowadays.



Lead Azide
Lead azide has a high-ignition temperature and is
today the most commonly used primary explosive.
Lead azide is poisonous, slightly soluble in hot
water and in alcohol, and highly soluble in a diluted
solution of nitric or acetic acid in which a little sodium
nitrate has been dissolved It reacts with copper, zinc,
cadmium, or alloys containing such metals, forming an
azide that is more sensitive than the original lead tide.
Because lead azide does not react with aluminum,
detonator capsules for lead azide are made of this metal.
The hygroscopicity of lead azide is very low. Water
does not reduce its impact sensitivity, as is the case with
mercury fulminate. Ammonium acetate and sodium
bichromate are used to destroy small quantities of lead
azide. Lead tide may be used where detonation is
caused by flame or heat. The velocity of detonation is
approximately 17,500 feet per second (fps). Its color
varies from white to buff. Lead azide is widely used as
an initiating explosive in high-explosive detonator
devices.
Lead azide, when protected from humidity, is
completely stable in stowage.

Lead Styphnate
There are two forms of lead styphnate—the normal
that appears as six-sided monohydrate crystals and the
basic that appears as small, rectangular crystals. Lead
styphnate is particularly sensitive to fire and the
discharge of static electricity. When the styphnate is
dry, it can readily ignite by static discharges from the
human body. The longer and narrower the crystals, the
more susceptible the material is to static electricity.
Lead styphnate does not react with metals. It is less
sensitive to shock and fiction than lead azide. Lead
styphnate is slightly soluble in water and methyl alcohol
and may be neutralized by a solution of sodium
carbonate. The velocity of detonation is approximately
17,000 fps. The color of lead styphnate varies from
yellow to brown. Lead styphnate is used as an initiating
explosive in propellant primer and high-explosive
detonator devices.

Link Posted: 3/23/2006 7:11:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Jetlag:

Originally Posted By Bubbatheredneck:
???? Lead in the primer????


You bet. That's why ranges have those fancy air conditioning units nowadays.



Lead Azide
Lead azide has a high-ignition temperature and is
today the most commonly used primary explosive.
Lead azide is poisonous, slightly soluble in hot
water and in alcohol, and highly soluble in a diluted
solution of nitric or acetic acid in which a little sodium
nitrate has been dissolved It reacts with copper, zinc,
cadmium, or alloys containing such metals, forming an
azide that is more sensitive than the original lead tide.
Because lead azide does not react with aluminum,
detonator capsules for lead azide are made of this metal.
The hygroscopicity of lead azide is very low. Water
does not reduce its impact sensitivity, as is the case with
mercury fulminate. Ammonium acetate and sodium
bichromate are used to destroy small quantities of lead
azide. Lead tide may be used where detonation is
caused by flame or heat. The velocity of detonation is
approximately 17,500 feet per second (fps). Its color
varies from white to buff. Lead azide is widely used as
an initiating explosive in high-explosive detonator
devices.
Lead azide, when protected from humidity, is
completely stable in stowage.

Lead Styphnate
There are two forms of lead styphnate—the normal
that appears as six-sided monohydrate crystals and the
basic that appears as small, rectangular crystals. Lead
styphnate is particularly sensitive to fire and the
discharge of static electricity. When the styphnate is
dry, it can readily ignite by static discharges from the
human body. The longer and narrower the crystals, the
more susceptible the material is to static electricity.
Lead styphnate does not react with metals. It is less
sensitive to shock and fiction than lead azide. Lead
styphnate is slightly soluble in water and methyl alcohol
and may be neutralized by a solution of sodium
carbonate. The velocity of detonation is approximately
17,000 fps. The color of lead styphnate varies from
yellow to brown. Lead styphnate is used as an initiating
explosive in propellant primer and high-explosive
detonator devices.





I had no idea what primers were made of............
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 3:54:27 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/25/2006 3:56:15 AM EDT by Unicorn]
In reality, the vast majority of lead in the air from shooting doesn't come from the base of the bullet vaporising, or disintegrating on impat. It's from the lead in the primer. The lead styphnate primers were th first ones that weren't corrosive but still had the reliabiltiy of the old corrosive primers. That, and to a slightly lessor amount, the cost have been the reason that you don't see too many lead free primers in use.

And the wax won't do anything bad at all to a pistol. At the very worst if somehow some of the rounds melted it would just take some scrubbing, maybe a bit of heat to soften it, and perhaps some solvent that dissolves wax. Hell, it might even make the bore more rust resistant until it's cleaned, or regular round are fired through it.
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