Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 9/15/2009 6:53:55 AM EST
Hey guys,

I've got a question for y'all on your "buying philosophy." I'm not trying to be judgmental at all, I'm just curious and would like to know how others feel about it. I've only just recently gotten into sidearms compared to my long guns, but I have a similar philosophy with them, too.

I guess you could say I've been very... conservative buying handguns?

My first was a Beretta 92F from 1984 (she's older than I am), because I wanted to practice with something identical to my issued weapon, and therefore the handgun I will most likely be carrying in a force on force confrontation, and thus the most likely sidearm to save my life should it come to that. I'll tell you this, I didn't like it at first, I've got smaller hands and it is a big gun for what it is, but nevertheless, I wasn't given much choice in the matter, so I trained with it, shot it, and learned its ins and outs, and it's grown on me, and I've warmed up to it a lot, and the big, ugly Beretta is one of my favorite pistols now, despite its limitations.

After reaching a good level of comfort with the M9, I decided that I did want to branch out into a different pistol, a pistol that I had chosen myself, not one that was chosen for me. I wanted a service pistol in a better caliber than 9mm, that was basically my only requirement. Something with more "punch." Now, I did come from a shooting culture, growing up in the Northeast, such things were just not common in suburban New Jersey. What this meant is that I did not have dad, or grandpa, or uncle whomever filling my head with stories of this legendary gun or that legendary gun, and had few preconceived notions about I don't like this or I don't trust that. So, when I went looking for a new pistol, I cast the net far and wide, as "standard" calibers, I settled on wanting something in either .40 S&W or .45 ACP. I rented several different kinds of guns in the process, everything from Glocks to Beretta 96s and HK45s.

And this is where my question comes in, to tell the truth, I plain old just didn't like the Glocks. Very quickly the choices for me boiled down to the Beretta 96G-SD, the HK 45 and single stack 1911s. While I know the ARFCOM way is "buy one of each," to me, this was going to be a major purchase and investment, and I needed to make the right decision, because this next pistol would dictate pretty much every future purchase I would make.

At the very least, I usually insist on having one nearly identical backup to any primary weapon, in case one is in need of maintenance, or breaks down for whatever reason, I always have two "primary configuration" weapons at my disposal which I try to rotate between every once in a while (for example, I have two M4s configured the same way, the only difference being one is a 14.5" SBR, and one is Title 1 with 14.5" barrel and pinned FH). So purchasing this handgun would at least put me in need of a second. It would also effectively lock me into my caliber choice, and future platforms.

For a good long while, the 96G-SD was the front runner, though I would have preferred it in .45 ACP, the fact that the manual of arms would be identical to the M9 was one of the biggest things that it had going for it.

In the end, though, I ended up going the 1911 route, because it fit me best, believe it or not, my appreciation for the history and "classicness" of the ol' JMB warhorse came after I had decided to go with it as my sidearm platform. To me, believe it or not, the M9 was, at the time, my idea of the "classic Army pistol" because it was what I had seen the most of and knew best.

But now I find myself in this situation:

I refuse to buy anything other than an M9, 92FS, or 92F in 9mm. I've often considered a 9mm 1911, but until the Army lets me carry one, I won't get one, because if I'm shooting 9mm (not my choice pistol caliber) I will be shooting it in a Beretta, no point in developing muscle memory for any other pistol, other than familiarization to be able to operate something else. I've worked in a shop before, so I'm able to use and operate a wide variety of handguns, but when I'm payin' for the ammo to train, 9mm = M9.

I won't customize a Beretta I train with, no adding "D springs" no trigger jobs, no Brigadier slides, though I'd love to do all those things, as I'm a tinkerer, this is part of what attracted me to 1911s, I can tinker with them and really make them mine, while Berettas, for me (and me alone) should remain stock, i.e. as issued, the most I will do is change grips and other user-level maintenance, no functional modifications.

I won't buy anything in .40 S&W. Not because there's anything wrong with the caliber, again, I've been very tempted to purchase 96G-SDs when I've seen them up for sale. But it's got two strikes against it, first, the railed frame, which was attractive when I first considered it, now that I've committed my resources to a platform makes it incompatible with most Beretta holsters, and it was never going to be compatible with 1911 holsters. I'm a big fan of modular accessories, needless to say, and cross compatibility.

Also, buying a .40 caliber pistol would require me to have to stock a third caliber and two additional loads, a practice FMJ load, and a defensive load, which would complicate my logistics, nothing as annoying as driving forty five minutes to the range to find you've brought the wrong ammunition. It hasn't happened to me, but I've had it happen to friends who complicate their supply lines with a million different calibers, it's a lot easier to accidentally grab a box of .45 GAP instead of .45 ACP when it's mixed in with five different calibers than to accidentally grab the 9mm when you meant to grab the .45 ACP.

I'm also a spare parts whore. When people ask me how many guns of a particular type I have, the answer is typically "x and a half?..." because I always have spare parts on hand, and probably enough to put together another functional weapon without even knowing it, so I'm very very cautious about moving to any different platform because of the outlay to have spare parts on hand, and having to add another maintenance schedule.

Finally, I'm reluctant to get attached to anything with a different manual of arms than my primary platforms, which at this point is either factory DA/SA Beretta or SAO 1911. I know both systems intimately, can do maintenance on them, and have little confusion switching between the two, even with the opposed safeties, and even then I very much dislike the fact that if I fire a string with the 1911 first, I very occaisionally fail to let the Beretta trigger off far enough after a shot to allow it to reset.

By now, it should be obvious where I got my introduction to "gun culture," and where my mentality for it comes from, again, I'm not claiming my way is the only way, or even the best way, it's my way, and even then, it's really not, it's the way I've been taught by an organization that hasn't always made the best decisions, but it makes sense for me and for my resources.

So, I ask, does anyone else have a similar philosophy when it comes to their purchases? Or am I an oddball here, and I should go out and buy about twelve more varieties of guns in thirteen more calibers? Anyone that has an opposite philosophy, and lots of variety care to offer insight on their mindset, and why they like the variety? Tools in the toolbox, I just like it that way, ect.?

Anyways, I'm done rambling for now, oh, and an SGS compensator on an M9... is technically "user level maintenance."

~Augee
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 6:58:58 AM EST
I didn't read the whole post but I have many different guns in many different calibers.

My list keeps growing and I have no intention of not having a variety.
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 7:39:37 AM EST
I like focusing all my training on one type of gun. However, I do have a variety of other guns that I like to have in the collection. These will see fewer rounds and will be shot more for pleasure than the "user" guns, which are tools.
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 7:50:56 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 8:06:32 AM EST
Most of my firearms are AR platform and 1911 platform based. These are my two favorite platforms (fun wise) and the two platforms I am best with (performance wise).

If I had the money I'd buy three of everything... but I don't, so I keep it practical and stick with two platforms (for the most part).





Link Posted: 9/15/2009 8:09:54 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/15/2009 8:10:05 AM EST by HardShell]
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 8:22:51 AM EST
First pistol was an HK USP 9 second pistol was an FNP40, oh and I'm a Southpaw btw, shot my USP 9 way more than the FNP40. The FNP line is just as good as HK IMO. The HK was and still is more southpaw friendly than any other handgun on the market IMO, that's why I sold the FNP40 and got a USPC in 40.
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 8:28:49 AM EST
You should stick with one platform, you will be a better shooter if you develop your grip etc around it.

That said it wouldnt do any harm to run a box through something different every now and then.

I just wont be like some guys I know, they take 200rds and run it through a Glock, SIG and a Beretta every time they go to the range. They could do much better I know if they left two of them at home most of the time.
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 8:36:28 AM EST
I didn't read your post, too long, so if you really asked about horses or tires disregard my post.


I have many different guns in several different calibers. I try to stay within the same calibers, but that doesn't seem to work.

I shoot certain guns more than other, so for those I stock up on ammo. The rest just hang out and get shot every couple months.

Link Posted: 9/15/2009 9:06:22 AM EST
I have owned many different guns and calibers, always had my favorites that I carried all the time. I found it was a pain in the ass to keep my wife proficient w/ all the different types(da/sa auto, sa auto, da/sa wheel, da only wheel, etc). She liked the K40 the best but groups w/ a glock were half the size w/ twice the capacity, glock is my weapon of choice. I sold or traded everything else except for a couple of .380 bugs and .22lr's. 90% of my weapons are Glocks and AR's. Boring collection by some standards but works for me, I own 5 calibers (.22lr, .380, .40, 5.56, .308) and don't plan on adding any unless I develop a need for long range heavy hitter(.300, .338).
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 9:12:09 AM EST
Based on your reasoning, I would stick with the platforms you already have, for anything other than a range only/fun gun. For example I have XD's in 45, 40 and 9 (different purposes for all, but same platform/feel) and have a stockpile in each caliber. I also have a LCP and Tokarev, both of which I stock far less ammo for because they're not my "primary" platform. I may eventually pick up a 5-6" S&W 29/629, but I don't plan on keeping more than ~500 rounds of .44mag on hand because it'll just be a "fun gun."
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 9:13:34 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/15/2009 9:16:25 AM EST by 22LR]
Originally Posted By Augee:
Hey guys,

I've got a question for y'all on your "buying philosophy." I'm not trying to be judgmental at all, I'm just curious and would like to know how others feel about it. I've only just recently gotten into sidearms compared to my long guns, but I have a similar philosophy with them, too.

I guess you could say I've been very... conservative buying handguns?

My first was a Beretta 92F from 1984 (she's older than I am), because I wanted to practice with something identical to my issued weapon, and therefore the handgun I will most likely be carrying in a force on force confrontation, and thus the most likely sidearm to save my life should it come to that. I'll tell you this, I didn't like it at first, I've got smaller hands and it is a big gun for what it is, but nevertheless, I wasn't given much choice in the matter, so I trained with it, shot it, and learned its ins and outs, and it's grown on me, and I've warmed up to it a lot, and the big, ugly Beretta is one of my favorite pistols now, despite its limitations.

After reaching a good level of comfort with the M9, I decided that I did want to branch out into a different pistol, a pistol that I had chosen myself, not one that was chosen for me. I wanted a service pistol in a better caliber than 9mm, that was basically my only requirement. Something with more "punch." Now, I did come from a shooting culture, growing up in the Northeast, such things were just not common in suburban New Jersey. What this meant is that I did not have dad, or grandpa, or uncle whomever filling my head with stories of this legendary gun or that legendary gun, and had few preconceived notions about I don't like this or I don't trust that. So, when I went looking for a new pistol, I cast the net far and wide, as "standard" calibers, I settled on wanting something in either .40 S&W or .45 ACP. I rented several different kinds of guns in the process, everything from Glocks to Beretta 96s and HK45s.

And this is where my question comes in, to tell the truth, I plain old just didn't like the Glocks. Very quickly the choices for me boiled down to the Beretta 96G-SD, the HK 45 and single stack 1911s. While I know the ARFCOM way is "buy one of each," to me, this was going to be a major purchase and investment, and I needed to make the right decision, because this next pistol would dictate pretty much every future purchase I would make.

At the very least, I usually insist on having one nearly identical backup to any primary weapon, in case one is in need of maintenance, or breaks down for whatever reason, I always have two "primary configuration" weapons at my disposal which I try to rotate between every once in a while (for example, I have two M4s configured the same way, the only difference being one is a 14.5" SBR, and one is Title 1 with 14.5" barrel and pinned FH). So purchasing this handgun would at least put me in need of a second. It would also effectively lock me into my caliber choice, and future platforms.

For a good long while, the 96G-SD was the front runner, though I would have preferred it in .45 ACP, the fact that the manual of arms would be identical to the M9 was one of the biggest things that it had going for it.

In the end, though, I ended up going the 1911 route, because it fit me best, believe it or not, my appreciation for the history and "classicness" of the ol' JMB warhorse came after I had decided to go with it as my sidearm platform. To me, believe it or not, the M9 was, at the time, my idea of the "classic Army pistol" because it was what I had seen the most of and knew best.

But now I find myself in this situation:

I refuse to buy anything other than an M9, 92FS, or 92F in 9mm. I've often considered a 9mm 1911, but until the Army lets me carry one, I won't get one, because if I'm shooting 9mm (not my choice pistol caliber) I will be shooting it in a Beretta, no point in developing muscle memory for any other pistol, other than familiarization to be able to operate something else. I've worked in a shop before, so I'm able to use and operate a wide variety of handguns, but when I'm payin' for the ammo to train, 9mm = M9.

i settled on the calibers i would buy shortly after i decided to get into shooting. i relized the sky was the limit, but my pocketbook wasnt and that with finite calibers out there, but infinite that could be made i made my list. now if a new caliber happen to pop up, i may decided to add it, but i would have to justify it and how it fits into what i have or dont.

I won't customize a Beretta I train with, no adding "D springs" no trigger jobs, no Brigadier slides, though I'd love to do all those things, as I'm a tinkerer, this is part of what attracted me to 1911s, I can tinker with them and really make them mine, while Berettas, for me (and me alone) should remain stock, i.e. as issued, the most I will do is change grips and other user-level maintenance, no functional modifications.

i dont customize other then adding hogues/pachmyrs. i live by ...if it aint broke......one of my shooting buds, loves to tinker or shoud i say FU his guns. once i found this out, i swore to never buy a gun from him. whenever he tinkers with his toys, he can never figure out why he has issues afterwards. i have bought customized used guns since i find that the people that dump the $$$ into the guns rarely get the $$ out and i can usually get them at a cheap/reasonable price if i like it or want it.

I won't buy anything in .40 S&W. Not because there's anything wrong with the caliber, again, I've been very tempted to purchase 96G-SDs when I've seen them up for sale. But it's got two strikes against it, first, the railed frame, which was attractive when I first considered it, now that I've committed my resources to a platform makes it incompatible with most Beretta holsters, and it was never going to be compatible with 1911 holsters. I'm a big fan of modular accessories, needless to say, and cross compatibility.

i wont get a 40 either. its just becasue the 10 was out before the 40 and thats what i choose to get. its unfortunate since there are more 40s out there now too.

Also, buying a .40 caliber pistol would require me to have to stock a third caliber and two additional loads, a practice FMJ load, and a defensive load, which would complicate my logistics, nothing as annoying as driving forty five minutes to the range to find you've brought the wrong ammunition. It hasn't happened to me, but I've had it happen to friends who complicate their supply lines with a million different calibers, it's a lot easier to accidentally grab a box of .45 GAP instead of .45 ACP when it's mixed in with five different calibers than to accidentally grab the 9mm when you meant to grab the .45 ACP.

I'm also a spare parts whore. When people ask me how many guns of a particular type I have, the answer is typically "x and a half?..." because I always have spare parts on hand, and probably enough to put together another functional weapon without even knowing it, so I'm very very cautious about moving to any different platform because of the outlay to have spare parts on hand, and having to add another maintenance schedule.

im opposite. although maybe i should buy some spares. but i have alot of different handguns to choose from so if one goes TU, theres another. i aslo have several in the same caliber/mfg. just an FYI, ive been shooting/buying guns since the late 70s and ive only had a handful of breakages. so from my experience, it wasnt a big deal. at the time it was, but it wasnt something that sending it back to the OEM or Cert repair center couldnt fix.

Finally, I'm reluctant to get attached to anything with a different manual of arms than my primary platforms, which at this point is either factory DA/SA Beretta or SAO 1911. I know both systems intimately, can do maintenance on them, and have little confusion switching between the two, even with the opposed safeties, and even then I very much dislike the fact that if I fire a string with the 1911 first, I very occaisionally fail to let the Beretta trigger off far enough after a shot to allow it to reset.

if you feel comfortable in this stick with it. i chose to know/try/buy as many different platforms as i could after i invited a local LEO to shoot. when the LEO asked were the safety was on my revolver, i chose right there to learn/try/buy/shoot as many different platforms as possible.

By now, it should be obvious where I got my introduction to "gun culture," and where my mentality for it comes from, again, I'm not claiming my way is the only way, or even the best way, it's my way, and even then, it's really not, it's the way I've been taught by an organization that hasn't always made the best decisions, but it makes sense for me and for my resources.

So, I ask, does anyone else have a similar philosophy when it comes to their purchases? Or am I an oddball here, and I should go out and buy about twelve more varieties of guns in thirteen more calibers? Anyone that has an opposite philosophy, and lots of variety care to offer insight on their mindset, and why they like the variety? Tools in the toolbox, I just like it that way, ect.?

do what you want. i follow/buy what i like not what others tell me to. i will LISTEN/READ about possible issues/flaws with future purchases, but will take them with a grain of salt. here is what i buy/collect in terms of calibers. 22LR, 9mm, 357mag, 10mm, 44mag, 45acp/LC, 223, 30m1, 7.62x39, 30/30,308, 30-06 i may or maynot have a gun in those calibers,but iirc, i do. i like the variety to learn what each gun has in terms of features and such and how they differ. i like some of the odd units too, but they have to be in the calibers i have. some odd/unique are. Daewoo DP51, Spectre, CZ99 and Cougars.

Anyways, I'm done rambling for now, oh, and an SGS compensator on an M9... is technically "user level maintenance."

~Augee


Link Posted: 9/15/2009 10:00:51 AM EST
If it works for you, keep at it.

The fundamentals of pistol shooting don't change, so the more you practice them the better you'll get, provided the platform is no limitation.

There was a time when I wanted one of everything. Then I found I struggled with trying to use, for instance, DA/SA guns, I found that Glocks weren't built with my hand in mind, etc.

Now I still have a diverse collection, but different things are there because they fit a specific role, and not simply for diversity's sake.
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 11:33:55 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/15/2009 11:34:14 AM EST by Augee]
Thanks for the responses so far guys, BTW, who's the one who thinks pie is for commies?

I'm not trying to change my way of doing things, or trying to get approval, I will most likely continue on doing things the same ol' way.

I'm just curious about *you* and what your pistol buying/caliber stocking philosophies are, I guess the "do I need a Hi Power" thread got me thinking about, because while I would love to have a Hi Power, it's not one of *my* supported platforms, so I would probably pass, unless, you know, someone were to offer one to me for $100 or something, if they did that, I'd probably even buy a Glock !

We're all enthusiasts here (or at least I *think* that's a reasonable assumption), but we don't all need to think alike to share interests, so I'm just wondering what thought processes everyone goes through when stocking their collections?

Do you want logistical simplicity and training continuity? Do you collect "representative firearms" of different types? Is there a theme to your collection? Do you like guns and want to buy anything that strikes your fancy? As I've said, for now, I vote for the first, but it's not the only way, and it's not the right way, it's just my way. What's yours?

~Augee
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 12:11:21 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/15/2009 12:12:31 PM EST by mercdank]
now that i am young i am going to stick to just one pistol and one caliber, but once i get a full time job and start making money i will probably buy a lot. my dad did the same thing only with surfboards. he had only one until he started to make money, now he has a room in Peru with about 50 surfboards, all different.
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 12:52:27 PM EST
Originally Posted By Augee:

So, I ask, does anyone else have a similar philosophy when it comes to their purchases? Or am I an oddball here, and I should go out and buy about twelve more varieties of guns in thirteen more calibers?




Yes...................

Link Posted: 9/15/2009 12:55:37 PM EST
Originally Posted By Augee:

Do you want logistical simplicity and training continuity? Do you collect "representative firearms" of different types? Is there a theme to your collection? Do you like guns and want to buy anything that strikes your fancy?




Yes......................

Link Posted: 9/15/2009 1:48:25 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/15/2009 1:53:36 PM EST by JohnRippert]
I have one carbine and one pistol that go to the range with me every time. I also throw in a couple more guns when I go and I change those around each trip so that eventually I go through most of my collection.



Cheesecake, nasty stuff.

On the other hand,

chocolate cream pie
coconut cream pie
banana cream pie
apple pie
pumpkin pie
pecan pie
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 8:00:40 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/15/2009 8:01:56 PM EST by 22LR]
Originally Posted By Augee:
Thanks for the responses so far guys, BTW, who's the one who thinks pie is for commies?

I'm not trying to change my way of doing things, or trying to get approval, I will most likely continue on doing things the same ol' way.

I'm just curious about *you* and what your pistol buying/caliber stocking philosophies are, I guess the "do I need a Hi Power" thread got me thinking about, because while I would love to have a Hi Power, it's not one of *my* supported platforms, so I would probably pass, unless, you know, someone were to offer one to me for $100 or something, if they did that, I'd probably even buy a Glock !

We're all enthusiasts here (or at least I *think* that's a reasonable assumption), but we don't all need to think alike to share interests, so I'm just wondering what thought processes everyone goes through when stocking their collections? is it neat/nifty? do i want it? will it fill a void in my collection?

Do you want logistical simplicity and training continuity? no .Do you collect "representative firearms" of different types? yes/no Is there a theme to your collection?#1 22LR, #2 CZ, #3 9mm, #4 45acp Do you like guns and want to buy anything that strikes your fancy? yes/sometimes As I've said, for now, I vote for the first, but it's not the only way, and it's not the right way, it's just my way. What's yours?

~Augee


Link Posted: 9/16/2009 4:28:39 AM EST
I like collecting different firearms.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 6:41:54 AM EST
My collection has a half a dozen different themes, to many really. Smith Model 10, duty 9mm's, bolt action mil surp rifles, USGI rifles, plus several that don't fit in any theme.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 8:03:03 AM EST
I have a bunch of K frame S&W's. Some are fixed sight, some are adjustable. These are what I will be found shooting 95% of the time. I'm better with them than any autoloader I've handled, but then again I don't shoot those much.

95% of my shotgunning involves one of the 5 rem 870's I own. I do better with the 870 than the Ithaca 37, SxS, or autoloaders.

Rifles are different, but I don't really shoot rifles a lot.

In general, stick to one or two guns in each category. If you have to go with multiples, make them as similar as possible. Familiarize yourself with as many as possible, just in case, but stick to one or two.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 8:59:35 AM EST
Sounds like we are a lot alike in some ways? I’m also former Jersey boy who didn’t grow up around guns or "gun nuts". From a practical perspective, I think it makes a lot of sense to focus on one rifle and one pistol platform. I also believe in the “2 is one, one is none” philosophy and also like to have a bunch of spare parts and mags for my primary weapons. On top of that, I like to be able to do most, if not all, of the gunsmithing that my primary firearms may ever need. I try to keep myself 100% self sufficient and not reliant on anyone to keep my primary weapons running. In my case, my primary rifle platform is the AR and my primary pistol platform is the Glock and one of the reasons why I chose those platforms is because of how easy they are to get parts for and how easy they are work on. That said, my Glocks and AR’s are not the only firearms I have but they are the firearms I shoot the most and the only ones I train with.

I guess what it comes down to is; why do you own guns to start with? For some people, firearms are just tools that serve a specific purpose (i.e. hunting, self defense, competition, etc.) and that’s it. For those people, the focus is on the task they are trying to accomplish and the firearms just tools used to complete that task. For others, firearms are purely a hobby or interest. The firearms themselves are the focus and whatever they do with them (hunting, competitions, training, etc.) are just activities that give them a reason or excuse to own and use those firearms they covet. I think most of use fall somewhere in between.

I’m kind of 50\50. I believe in being prepared and being able to protect myself and my family. To be able to do that effectively, I believe in good training and I also realize that the skills you learn and develop in training are perishable so to maintain them, regular practice is required. From a resource perspective (resources being time and money) I do not think it makes sense to train and maintain skills on multiple platforms. Hence the reason why I stick to one rifle and one pistol platform for self defense

On the other hand, I am a hobbyist too and can appreciate and enjoy a nice weapon just for what it is and it doesn’t have to have a specific “purpose” for me to own it and enjoy it. As a hobbyist, I doubt I would ever be happy with just one rifle (or rifle platform) and one pistol (or pistol platform). There are just way too many cool guns out there to limit myself that much.

So how I decide is this… Any gun that I consider buying for the purpose of self defense must fit into my 2 chosen platforms. Beyond that I get whatever I like. The majority of my range time goes towards my primary weapons. What that means for me is I almost always bring and shoot at least one of my AR’s and one of my Glocks and if I have time, I may bring one or 2 of my non-SD guns that I will shoot at the end of my range time just for fun. At least that’s the plan anyway.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 9:26:02 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 9:31:02 AM EST
Originally Posted By airgunner:
...


Great post.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 9:36:54 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 9:40:04 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/16/2009 9:42:05 AM EST by Hero]
Originally Posted By HardShell:

Originally Posted By Hero:
Originally Posted By airgunner:
"I LOVE ARs and GLOCKS!!!" airgunner


Great post.

Yep –– right down to the choices for his 2 primary defensive platforms.




QFT! I've always used the AR for my main user rifle. I've tried many, many times to switch off of Glocks as my user pistol because I don't particularly like shooting them. I've yet to be successful at switching away from Glock.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 10:03:56 AM EST
The secret to having multiple platforms of multiple calibers is time, space, and reloading. If I did not reload I would probably only own 3 rifle calibers (.22, 22-250, and 30-06) and maybe just .22, .45 ACP, and 9mm in hanguns. However handloading allows for less expensive .44 mag, 357 mag, 41 mag, 45 ACP, 7-30 Waters, 308, 223, 243, and the list goes on. Since I do not reload shotgun shells, I only have 12's and 20's. If I reloaded shotgun shells, I have to imagine I would have 410 and 28 offerings.

I have purchased very few guns that I did not have a specific "use" for but it happens when you don't worry too much about feeding them and when good deals pop up as time passes.

Seems as though you are young, have limited storage, and limited funds. Assuming the limited items become less limited with age, your philosophy may change. For now it just seems like you are being responsible. Good for you.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 12:48:32 PM EST
Originally Posted By HardShell:

Originally Posted By Hero:
Originally Posted By airgunner:
...


Great post.

Yep –– right down to the choices for his 2 primary defensive platforms.

What can I say, I try
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 1:33:38 PM EST
Your philosophy is solid, nothing wong with it. I like a little spice however.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:05:02 AM EST
Originally Posted By Augee:


I'm just curious about *you* and what your pistol buying/caliber stocking philosophies are, I guess the "do I need a Hi Power" thread got me thinking about, because while I would love to have a Hi Power, it's not one of *my* supported platforms, so I would probably pass, unless, you know, someone were to offer one to me for $100 or something, if they did that, I'd probably even buy a Glock !


~Augee


My first gun was an XD45c. My newest is a 1911. The 1911 does everything I want better than the XD does, and they are both the same caliber. I guess it's a result of years of teaching from my dad not to waste money on stuff I don't use, but I feel a need to justify keeping the XD. The reasons to keep it are:

1. Bigger mag capacity - saves time on reloading in competitions
2. It's my first ever gun.

I still may sell it. Not the definitive philosophy, but that's how I feel.
Link Posted: 9/18/2009 6:26:21 PM EST
I love variety.

I have handguns in every major caliber including .357 Sig and 10mm and have guns from nearly every current major manufacturer and plan on getting guns from the few that I don't have already. I also have SAO, DA/SA, revolver, DAO. I think it's been fun and enlightening to mix it up a little bit and try new things. I think I'm a better shooter by learning how to become proficient with many different platforms. None of us are here because this isn't a hobby to some extent.
Link Posted: 9/19/2009 2:45:49 AM EST
I enjoy my guns. I don't drink just one kind of wine or beer or one type of food. I have never date one kind of woman either. And the basics carry over to every gun I have picked up, trigger control, sight alignment and mental / physical ability. Life is too short.

Link Posted: 9/19/2009 10:04:32 PM EST
There are 2 things going on. If you are familiar with different types of weapons, it is easier to pick up an unfamiliar weapon and use it well. If you are familiar with a type of weapon and that's what you have, you will be better with it. I've shot a number of weapons and can adjust quickly and get by with about anything. But "adjust" is the key word. It takes some rounds down range to get a feel for a different weapon.
And don't give Glock a pass so fast. I avoided Glock a pass for a long time. It does have a different feel. but they are right next to the 1911 in being easy to shoot accurately.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 11:28:43 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/20/2009 11:31:10 AM EST by TCBA_Joe]
I love guns. I don't just like to shoot, I love GUNS. There is no gun on this planet I won't take the chance to shoot if given the chance. The more different guns I get to try, the better. I find all aspects of them interesting, the history, the operation, the philosophy. I built a sidecharging 9mm AR in the style I did because I'd never seen one like that. My long term goal is to get an MGI lower and upper and just got nuts with calibers, lengths, and magazine choices. After-all, if all you have is a hammer, every gun-solvable problem is a nail. (Ever notice they make a myriad of different hammers and nails?)

So, needless to say, for me I think variety is the spice of life.

But, I do understand there are people who just like to shoot, or just see it as a skill to be learned. I understand their desire to have 3 copies of their 1 handgun and 1 rifle. (Main, backup, and backup-backup), but unfortunately I don't have the kind of cash to buy 3 of each in addition to all the varieties I'd like to own/build. So right now I'm working to buy the guns I'll use if it's go-time.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 1:09:46 PM EST
I like guns and shooting too much. You're probably right, if I just had 1 I'd be really really good at it, but I love guns and shooting too much to just have one. I'm best with the 1911 and Glock platforms as that is what I train with the most, but I have a bunch of different guns and calibers.

Since this is also enjoyment for me, I get to do what I want even if it isn't in my best interest from a purely utilitarian standpoint. But I have thought about just sticking with and using work guns. But then I'd have to get another hobby I suppose...
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 2:03:45 PM EST
Originally Posted By Augee:
Finally, I'm reluctant to get attached to anything with a different manual of arms than my primary platforms, which at this point is either factory DA/SA Beretta or SAO 1911. I know both systems intimately, can do maintenance on them, and have little confusion switching between the two, even with the opposed safeties, and even then I very much dislike the fact that if I fire a string with the 1911 first, I very occaisionally fail to let the Beretta trigger off far enough after a shot to allow it to reset.

~Augee


This is why I sold my Browning Hi Power.
Trigger reset on my Glocks is so short and "snappy" that I was really screwed up when switching back and forth between the BHP & the Glock.
I have standardized on .40 S&W Glocks, as that is what I am issued and the only thing I am authorized to carry, on and off duty.
Strangely, I have no issues switching back and forth between my Glock and my Colt NM Gold Cup - the trigger reset is similar, I can slingshot the slide without fear of engaging a slide mounted safety (M9) and since I shoot high thumbs, the safety offers no issues for me.
The other handguns I own (S&W Model 19, S&W Model 49, S&W Model 10, and Colt Police Positive) are all substantially different enough that I have not developed any training scars.
Additionally, since I am saddled with the NY1 trigger mod. on my Glocks, shooting double action revolvers has helped me to improve my trigger control on the Glock.

Also, just a final comment - if you standardize on one platform, and become really good with that platform, it will translate over to any other gun you pick up.
The fundamentals of marksmanship apply across the board, irregardless of platform, but IMO it is best not to confuse yourself with 6 different manuals of arms.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 3:48:18 PM EST
Originally Posted By thedoctors308:
Originally Posted By Augee:
Finally, I'm reluctant to get attached to anything with a different manual of arms than my primary platforms, which at this point is either factory DA/SA Beretta or SAO 1911. I know both systems intimately, can do maintenance on them, and have little confusion switching between the two, even with the opposed safeties, and even then I very much dislike the fact that if I fire a string with the 1911 first, I very occaisionally fail to let the Beretta trigger off far enough after a shot to allow it to reset.

~Augee


This is why I sold my Browning Hi Power.
Trigger reset on my Glocks is so short and "snappy" that I was really screwed up when switching back and forth between the BHP & the Glock.
I have standardized on .40 S&W Glocks, as that is what I am issued and the only thing I am authorized to carry, on and off duty.
Strangely, I have no issues switching back and forth between my Glock and my Colt NM Gold Cup - the trigger reset is similar, I can slingshot the slide without fear of engaging a slide mounted safety (M9) and since I shoot high thumbs, the safety offers no issues for me.
The other handguns I own (S&W Model 19, S&W Model 49, S&W Model 10, and Colt Police Positive) are all substantially different enough that I have not developed any training scars.
Additionally, since I am saddled with the NY1 trigger mod. on my Glocks, shooting double action revolvers has helped me to improve my trigger control on the Glock.

Also, just a final comment - if you standardize on one platform, and become really good with that platform, it will translate over to any other gun you pick up.
The fundamentals of marksmanship apply across the board, irregardless of platform, but IMO it is best not to confuse yourself with 6 different manuals of arms.


I like being able to put my hands on anything from a revolver to an M2 machine gun and being able to understand the fundamentals and manual of arms with very little effort. Taught myself how to take down my 1911, Sig, and 870. I also figured out the AK, and AR without any instruction. I like being able to just pick up a gun and be able to use it a good trait. But, granted I'll never be as proficient and accurate with all those weapons as someone who knows that one gun they train with constantly.

But, as to fear the man with one gun, there are a lot of people out there with only one gun who will never be as proficient with that one gun as I am with the myriad of guns I have fired.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 4:32:47 PM EST
I call it consoloidation. Consolidation of calibers.
Even with that effort it still is challenge to stick to a strict x-over manual of arms. I've gotten about as close as you , different reasons and backrounds though. Originally 9mm Glocks and 5.56 carbines in training. And I'm still sticking with them. But a J-Frame is always in the picture; don't need much , but a different ammo. And a guy can't really get by w/out a versatile 12ga. right? Versatile and 12ga means 4+ different shells. But then life progressed , evoloved, and the 1911 was discovered. Needless to say , now there's .45acp , 9mm , 5.56 , 4x12g, .38spl , And that's before the .22lr trainers and plinkers.
So now we're at 6 ammos , and I'm probably conservative compared with others.

See , that's the problem with tools............... So many different sizes. It's always a toolk kit....



-JC
Top Top