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Posted: 10/29/2009 12:34:57 PM EST
I am looking at buying some surplus 7.62 x 25 ammo for a semi-auto PPSh-41 which is in the works. I see Romanian 1980's production and 1950's Polish ammo in sealed tins. Does anyone have any insight into which of these is reliable in a PPSh-41 (or any gun for that matter) as I want to stock up on the "best" suprlus ammo I can get at this time before it gets less plentiful and more expensive. Thanks.
Link Posted: 10/29/2009 2:02:42 PM EST
I recommend the Romanian all the way. Good, clean, consistent, reliable, and 30yrs younger than all the other surplus out there.
I have a semi-PPSh and have shot about 1500rds of the Romanian through it without a single ammunition related problem.
I have heard, but cannot confirm, that the semi-PPSh's are sensitive to hotter ammunition due to the changes in functioning required by switching from open bolt to closed bolt. The Czech and Bulgarian ammunition both seem to be a little hotter than the Romy, so that gives me another reason to stick with the Romanian despite the slightly higher price.
In my experience with my own semi-PPSh, it is fun to shoot, but demands a lot of attention. I have had to work on mine a lot to keep it running. It also gets very, very, very dirty. I usually spend an hour or more cleaning it after every shooting session.

FWIW-
Allen
Link Posted: 10/30/2009 12:09:38 AM EST
Allen,
Thanks for the valauble information. I had heard they are finicky and require attention. I guess I will have to become an expert quickly.
Link Posted: 10/30/2009 2:25:49 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/30/2009 2:26:06 AM EST by Animal_Farm]
Originally Posted By mragu:
Allen,
Thanks for the valauble information. I had heard they are finicky and require attention. I guess I will have to become an expert quickly.


You are welcome!
If yours is at all like mine, it will require more effort and mental anguish of you than almost any other firearm you own. Once again though, it is a very fun gun to shoot! The 7.62x25mm is a great little short-range carbine round. Like .357 magnum, it gains much benefit from a longer barrel.
Here are a few other semi-PPSh pointers. First and foremost, always wear eye protection. My semi-auto PPSh blows junk back in my face pretty bad. That top ejection makes it all come right back at you too. The drums are neat, but they are also heavy, complicated, and often less than 100% reliable. However, the stick mags are absolutely fantastic. They are extremely rugged, well built, and reliable, and if you shop around you can get them for about $10 each. I have only had trouble from one stick mag out of the 20 or so that I have purchased. It was feeding too far to the left and wouldn't chamber a round. It took a pair of vice-grips and about three seconds of 'adjusting' on the left hand feed lip and the mag was working perfectly.

-Allen
Link Posted: 11/2/2009 10:31:27 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/2/2009 10:32:38 AM EST by todd1013]
I don't own a PPSh-41, but I've shot quite a bit of 7.62x25 through a few Tokarevs. The Polish from the 1950's didn't really give me any problems. I had a few that FTF the first time and needed an additional strike, but nothing serious. The 1980's Romanian I wasn't too impressed with. I believe the spam can I had was from 1984. They all fired on the first strike, but the accuracy seemed to be off. Some of the casings had neck cracks before shooting (nothing severe so I shot them anyways), but about 90% of all the casings, even the ones that showed no cracks beforehand, looked like this after:

Again, not really a safety issue but I wasn't overly impressed with the Romanian. The 1980's Yugo is what I think is the best 7.62x25 surplus. It's given me no problems whatsoever and seems to be more accurate and cleaner than the rest. I believe it was made by Prvi Partizan in the mid 80's. Century Arms and Classic Arms sell the stuff. If you have your C&R or FFL, you can it for about $.09/rd shipped from Century Arms.
Link Posted: 11/2/2009 10:00:12 PM EST
Originally Posted By todd1013:
I don't own a PPSh-41, but I've shot quite a bit of 7.62x25 through a few Tokarevs. The Polish from the 1950's didn't really give me any problems. I had a few that FTF the first time and needed an additional strike, but nothing serious. The 1980's Romanian I wasn't too impressed with. I believe the spam can I had was from 1984. They all fired on the first strike, but the accuracy seemed to be off. Some of the casings had neck cracks before shooting (nothing severe so I shot them anyways), but about 90% of all the casings, even the ones that showed no cracks beforehand, looked like this after:
http://i34.tinypic.com/350p3tk.jpg
Again, not really a safety issue but I wasn't overly impressed with the Romanian. The 1980's Yugo is what I think is the best 7.62x25 surplus. It's given me no problems whatsoever and seems to be more accurate and cleaner than the rest. I believe it was made by Prvi Partizan in the mid 80's. Century Arms and Classic Arms sell the stuff. If you have your C&R or FFL, you can it for about $.09/rd shipped from Century Arms.


Strange. I have fired around 2200 rounds of the Romanian from various years through a CZ-52, four different TT33s, and my Wiselite semi-auto PPSh, and have not had problems with accuracy at all. In fact, one of the most surprising aspects of my PPSh was how accurate it was, and aside from a box or two of Wolf Gold(PPU) the Romanian is all I have ever shot out of it.
I frequently recover and inspect a good portion of my casings and I have only ever seen one Romanian split case, which occurred upon firing, and it wasn't nearly as bad as the ones you show in the picture. It was about half as long, and with no scorching. I have never seen any Romanian with neck cracks straight out of the can. Are you sure you didn't get it mixed up with some Bulgarian? They are well known for split necks.
On a side note, if you have any ammunition that have cracks in the necks, no matter how small they are, do not shoot them. Unless maybe you carefully load them into the chamber one at a time by hand. If the neck is split, it is not holding the bullet firmly enough and this can allow the bullet to setback during cycling causing dangerously high pressures when the round is fired.
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