Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 8/17/2004 10:30:48 PM EST
My beretta came from the factory with the plastic guide rod, but I've "heard" from people that I should replace it with the steel one. For $30 that isnt bad, but what benefit should I expect from it?

The plastic one seems to do ok, but I'd like to hear from Beretta owners on the subject...
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 4:44:01 PM EST
The steel one provides more weight, therefore a little less felt recoil. I have a 96 that came with the plastic and never had any problems with it.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 4:44:15 PM EST
Did the people telling you to replace it give any reasons? The polymer unit is self lubricating and is always black no matter how much it gets scratched.

If you want a guide rod that offers something, LTT makes a solid steel guide rod that adds a little weight up front to helpo control muzzle flip.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 4:46:47 PM EST
I get, well, killer accuracy out of mine with the stock guide rod.
Link Posted: 8/19/2004 10:18:15 PM EST
I've heard that I could expect better accuracy and durability, but thats about it.
Link Posted: 8/25/2004 9:11:34 AM EST
Stainless rods look better in an Inox model. At least the older 9x pistols that didn't have all the black controls.
The mercury filled guide rod helps a little, but it is tough to justify the price over such a small benefit. In a brut. finished 9x, the nylon one is the best since you can't wear off the finish.
The nylon guide rods are nice in the fact that they are self lubricating. I prefer the nylon magazine followers over the older cast ones for this reason alone.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 11:55:33 AM EST
Don't bother. Glocks have used nothing but nylon guide rods and it doesn't seem to bother them. It will not improve functioning or accuracy.

Link Posted: 9/10/2004 7:50:23 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/10/2004 7:51:17 PM EST by CAR-10]
I've got a 92 Brig and damn I love that gun. Picked it up a few months ago and finally had a chance to take it up to the country and destroy some soda cans.

Now I also have a P99 .40S&W. I can't stand the damn thing. And I'm not a lousy shooter or anything, but I just can't seem to hit shit with it. I never liked the excess recoil, so I ordered a Sprinco steel guide rod (with some serious recoil reducing springage) and it's strong as an ox. A little too strong, as I had to replace my mag springs to prevent the handgun from randomly locking the slide back halfway through the magazine. So strong that my wife can't even budge the slide when it's forward. All in all, the Sprinco guide rod decreased the recoil, but didn't really do much for me.

Now, in my 92 Brig will I be getting a steel guide rod? Probably not unless I find one for a good deal somewhere. I would not replace the spring with a stronger spring, that's for sure. My experience is that it just isn't worth it to buy a Sprinco type guide rod. Then you've got to get new mag springs, the slide is too stiff, yada yada.

Just a regular steel replacement for the existing polymer guide rod? I have to ask "why bother". I was very pleased with my accuracy with my 92 Brig while burning off 300 rounds. The incorporation of a polymer guide rod appears to be an industry standard and has been for at least the last 5 years. Unless you are going to be replacing with a stiffer spring (which I am now against) you aren't really going to feel the effect.

I must say I've never had so much fun with a handgun...ever! Especially standing with my hands resting on a 4' tall wooden fence.

but of course, YMMV
Link Posted: 9/11/2004 12:09:20 AM EST
Yeah, I have thought about it and I think I'll forego the steel guide rod.
Link Posted: 9/11/2004 5:56:13 PM EST
It's a cheap swapout, why not give it a try. I've done it for durability because pastic is nothing more than a money saver + my loads are hotter. "Self-lubrication" means burning or scuffing the plastic away. If for some reason you donn't care for it then throw it in your bin for a spare.
Link Posted: 9/11/2004 6:27:26 PM EST

Originally Posted By M199:
It's a cheap swapout, why not give it a try. I've done it for durability because pastic is nothing more than a money saver + my loads are hotter. "Self-lubrication" means burning or scuffing the plastic away. If for some reason you donn't care for it then throw it in your bin for a spare.



Just curious, how cheap are we talking here?
Top Top