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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/21/2005 3:41:15 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/21/2005 3:43:00 AM EDT by fight4yourrights]
Why?



Me - Condition 1 - it's what it was designed for, it the only condition that is readily deployed
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 4:21:12 AM EDT
Condition 2 is asking for trouble.
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 4:26:58 AM EDT
So correct me if I am wrong. Condition 1 is Hammer back round chambered?
Is that not dangerous. Please no flames I have never even handled a 1911 model firearm so I am unaware.
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 5:35:44 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/21/2005 5:36:33 AM EDT by scottfn308]

Originally Posted By UNIT6639:
So correct me if I am wrong. Condition 1 is Hammer back round chambered?
Is that not dangerous. Please no flames I have never even handled a 1911 model firearm so I am unaware.



Condition 1 is the way that JMB designed the pistol
to be carried and used. It is no more dangerous than
any other modern pistol design.

No one ever worries about carrying a Glock with a round
in the chamber. Guess what, that striker is cocked when you
cycle the slide to chamber a round. And a Glock dosen't even have
a safety !

A modern 1911 has at the very least 2 safetys on it.

A thumb safety that blockes the hammer, that must be disengaged
before the hammer can fall.

A grip safety that must be depressed before the trigger can be pulled.

And in the case of Colt guns, a firing pin lock that must be overcome as
well. So in the unlikely event that the thumb safety is disengaged, the sear
fails, and the hammer falls, it will still fall on a locked firing pin.

The 1911 pistol is one of the safest pistols on the market today.

Regards,

Scott

Link Posted: 8/21/2005 6:17:22 AM EDT
Condition 1: The way it was meant to be carried.
Condition 2: Dangerous.
Condition 3: Worthless.
I don't know what an 'other' condition could be, unless it's cocked and locked on an empty chamber.
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 6:19:38 AM EDT
Cocked & locked the way is was meant to be.
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 6:23:27 AM EDT
In my city, carrying a loaded firearm is illegal. however you can still carry concealed.

So, it's much easier to drop the mag if a LEO approaches, than it is to rack the slide.


However, this will be changing soon.
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 8:33:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By effinNewGuy:

Condition 2 is asking for trouble.




VERY dangerous trying to manual drop the trigger on a live round
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 9:06:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:

Originally Posted By effinNewGuy:

Condition 2 is asking for trouble.




VERY dangerous trying to manual drop the trigger on a live round



+1 cocked on locked owns
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 2:25:17 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 2:27:53 PM EDT
Whaddya think?
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 3:29:49 PM EDT
i dont see how anybody would consider condition two even REMOTELY safe
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 4:00:39 PM EDT
Hammer back, safety on.
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 4:08:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:
Why?

Me - Condition 1 - it's what it was designed for, it the only condition that is readily deployed



+1
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 4:15:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:

Originally Posted By effinNewGuy:

Condition 2 is asking for trouble.




VERY dangerous trying to manual drop the trigger on a live round



I disagree. I don't think there's really any good reason to lower the hammer on a chambered round, but it can be safely done if you're not an idiot.

1- put your thumb in between the hammer and the firing pin
2 - carefully pull the trigger and immediately let go of it after the sear lets go of the hammer
3 - ease the hammer forward with your finger off the trigger

There are DA/SA pistols out there that don't have decockers, and this is exactly what the instruction manuals tell you to do. An EAA witness model is one of them. I'm not sure if all EAA witness models are like this, but I have personally owned one and the instruction manual said to do exactly that. There's really no reason to do this with a 1911, though.
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 4:25:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NAM:
In my city, carrying a loaded firearm is illegal. however you can still carry concealed.



Yet another brilliant legislative marvel.
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 4:27:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By lu380:
I disagree. I don't think there's really any good reason to lower the hammer on a chambered round, but it can be safely done if you're not an idiot.

1- put your thumb in between the hammer and the firing pin
2 - carefully pull the trigger and immediately let go of it after the sear lets go of the hammer
3 - ease the hammer forward with your finger off the trigger

There are DA/SA pistols out there that don't have decockers, and this is exactly what the instruction manuals tell you to do. An EAA witness model is one of them. I'm not sure if all EAA witness models are like this, but I have personally owned one and the instruction manual said to do exactly that. There's really no reason to do this with a 1911, though.



I think leaving the hammer in a "half-cocked" position is not good for the sear. If you must do this method, go ahead and take the hammer home.

Cocked and Locked. No other option for me.

Link Posted: 8/21/2005 5:03:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By racezilla500:

Originally Posted By lu380:
I disagree. I don't think there's really any good reason to lower the hammer on a chambered round, but it can be safely done if you're not an idiot.

1- put your thumb in between the hammer and the firing pin
2 - carefully pull the trigger and immediately let go of it after the sear lets go of the hammer
3 - ease the hammer forward with your finger off the trigger

There are DA/SA pistols out there that don't have decockers, and this is exactly what the instruction manuals tell you to do. An EAA witness model is one of them. I'm not sure if all EAA witness models are like this, but I have personally owned one and the instruction manual said to do exactly that. There's really no reason to do this with a 1911, though.



I think leaving the hammer in a "half-cocked" position is not good for the sear. If you must do this method, go ahead and take the hammer home.

Cocked and Locked. No other option for me.




For simplicity's sake, I left that part out. You would of course repeat steps 1-3 in order to completely lower the hammer. Like I said before, there would be no reason to do this with any single action auto.
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 5:17:35 PM EDT
For some reason the Springfield Armory owners manual that comes with the GI model says that you're supposed to keep the gun in condition 2.

Condition 1 is the way to go. Hell, you can Mexican carry a Condition 1 Kimber and the safety won't even come off. Just don't try to run like that.
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 8:09:54 PM EDT
I don't understand the question/options. Simply put, the proper way to carry a 1911 is with a round chambered, a fully loaded mag in place and the thumb safety engaged. Condition 1, "cocked and locked". Using Wilson 47Ds (my favorite) will give you 9 rounds available and ready to go in a 1911 chambered in .45ACP.
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 8:12:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By lu380:

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:

Originally Posted By effinNewGuy:

Condition 2 is asking for trouble.




VERY dangerous trying to manual drop the trigger on a live round



1- put your thumb in between the hammer and the firing pin.




That is the ONLY way I could see doing it.


I've tried it (unloaded) and inevitably, I sliip off the hammer and it falls.
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 9:38:33 AM EDT
This poll is ridiculous. I can't believe that anyone with a solid understanding of the 1911's design and history, in addition to at least mediocre training would carry a 1911 outside of condition 1.

damian@adcofirearms.com
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 9:45:40 AM EDT
"There can be ONLY one....", says the Highlander.
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 10:06:02 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/22/2005 10:06:36 AM EDT by fight4yourrights]

Originally Posted By dubb-1:

This poll is ridiculous. I can't believe that anyone with a solid understanding of the 1911's design and history, in addition to at least mediocre training would carry a 1911 outside of condition 1.

damian@adcofirearms.com




Ridiculous? Nah.

You'd be surprised at the folks that balk at the sight of a cocked hammer.


6 people so far!
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 10:07:34 AM EDT
AGNTSA

Condition 1 is the only way to carry a 1911.
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 12:06:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TexasSIG:
AGNTSA

Condition 1 is the only way to carry a 1911.


Damn right! Say, uhh....what the heck does "AGNTSA" mean?
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 12:13:40 PM EDT
Cocked and locked.


Dont like it, get a different gun.
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 3:51:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Lumpy196:
Cocked and locked.


Dont like it, get a different gun.



Exactly! Nothing against those who are not comfortable with cocked and locked, but if it gives you the willies, you bought the wrong gun.
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 5:01:29 PM EDT
Condition 1...like there's really any other way.
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 5:41:13 PM EDT
Condition 1. I've never even thought about carrying a 1911 any other way.
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 6:47:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/22/2005 6:48:08 PM EDT by fight4yourrights]

Originally Posted By geegee:

Say, uhh....what the heck does "AGNTSA" mean?




GEEZE, instead of JEEZE

Link Posted: 8/23/2005 2:08:53 PM EDT
For christs sake don't carry it with a round chambered and the hammer down, resting on the firing pin; or in the half cock position! The "half cock" is a safety measure in case of a primary sear notch failure, using it as a safety can result in damage to the sear or unintentional discharge. Also the weapon may discharge if the hammer recieves enough pressure if it is allowed to rest on the firing pin. I just read about someone shooting himself because he put his 1911 in condition 2 and when he holstered it, the thumb break put enough pressure on the hammer and it went off.
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