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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/12/2005 12:28:17 PM EDT
Is this something I can just do at home with a dremel? Should I send the Springfield GI to a "pro" to do the same? It's stainless and has had three mags through it. It deforms the brass terribly half of the time.

Should I just give it time? I really just wanna redneck this thing and get it over with.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 12:48:23 PM EDT
Just go ahead and gut it out with the Dremel. I did my first one that way years ago without incident. It takes a steady hand and a good eye but that is pretty much the rule of thumb when using the Dremel.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 12:49:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ken_mays:
Just go ahead and gut it out with the Dremel. I did my first one that way years ago without incident. It takes a steady hand and a good eye but that is pretty much the rule of thumb when using the Dremel.



+1.

Mine wasn't pretty, but it was functional.


And like you said - you want to.

Link Posted: 9/12/2005 2:39:48 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 3:10:26 PM EDT
Forget the Dremel tool.
Use a Sawzall!
Jim
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 3:10:53 PM EDT
If you don't care about looks or resale, it's no different than painting your car with spraypaint.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 3:13:49 PM EDT
take the time and send it to a "pro".
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 4:07:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SGB:
Dremel



I did my first by hand with files. Takes longer and it's slower so it's easyer not to FUCK IT UP



Yep, start with a dremel on slow speed, then finish it by hand just to make good and sure. Helps to figure out a way to mark where you want to cut it down to. Oh yeah, if you scratch it by slipping or whatever, it's probably not going to buff out. Don't do it if you aren't sure if you can do it (or it's a nice 1911), otherwise send it off to a smith/get a new slide with lowered ejection port. I'd only ever try this if I had a replacement slide anyways or I had a cheap 1911 that I was just playing with.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:35:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SGB:
Dremel



I did my first by hand with files. Takes longer and it's slower so it's easyer not to FUCK IT UP



Slowly with a file. Did it to my IMI after paying to have it done on a Colt Officer.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 8:29:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/12/2005 8:29:41 PM EDT by RiftWeaver]
My latest concoction hit's the Bridgeport tomorrow. I want it to look nice and straight! After I get it back I will flare it and then I suppose I will have to go test the functionality of it. After that, I may have to test the functionality of it again....and again....and again.....

If you want to do it at home, I will give a big +1 to the "GO SLOW". Lay tape on the outside of the slide, dremel it close. Finish it up with a file to get a nice straight edge. Nobody likes a buggered up pile of turd. GO SLOW
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 8:40:23 PM EDT
Thanks. Will be careful and clean it up with file.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 8:42:54 PM EDT
Thats ghetto.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 10:28:11 PM EDT
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!! About the time you get that 20,000 RPM wheel to your nice pistol, you will run out of epilepsy medicine and ruin it. Leave the gunsmith work to the professional's. I can't even count on my digits all of the (what would have been a really nice 1911) ruined by someone who thought "Gee, I think I can do that".
Link Posted: 9/13/2005 2:15:01 AM EDT
Unless you are skilled with working with metal I personaly would have a smith do it. The reason is resale value. I know you do not want to or plan on selling your guns but you never know.
Link Posted: 9/13/2005 2:17:21 AM EDT
Use a torch if you are in a hurry. But use a hand file otherwise.
Link Posted: 9/13/2005 10:11:11 AM EDT
I am not recomending you do but if you use a dremel use one with adjustable speed and turn the speed down. Take your time and walk away for a while if you need to do not get in a hurry and get frustraited or you will hack it up for sure. I hope things go well whatever you decide. A gun smith would be the best bet.
Link Posted: 9/13/2005 10:21:37 AM EDT
Sure, Dremel it. It may not look as pretty as a gunsmith's work, but it will be functional and there will be genuine pride of ownership. My only advice is to be sure there are no sharp corners when you are finished, as these will be stress points that could cause the slide to crack... radius everything.
Link Posted: 9/13/2005 11:13:49 AM EDT
You people are fucking heathens.
Link Posted: 9/13/2005 11:20:45 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Lumpy196:
You people are fucking heathens.



I'm with Lumpy on this one
Link Posted: 9/13/2005 11:29:49 AM EDT
Do it right the first time.

Send it to a pro.

Link Posted: 9/13/2005 12:40:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Lumpy196:
You people are fucking heathens.



It's just a Springfield GI milspec for Pete's sake.

If he had a real 1911 I wouldn't be advocating it
Link Posted: 9/13/2005 1:32:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Lumpy196:
You people are fucking heathens.



Exactly.
Link Posted: 9/13/2005 4:15:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Hellhound:
Do it right the first time.

Send it to a pro.




+1
Have it lowered and flared back.
Link Posted: 9/13/2005 7:58:16 PM EDT
Its a cheap enough job to get done anyways, only $40 for my local gs to do it and I trust him, Ive seen some pretty guns come from his place.
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