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Page Handguns » H&K
Posted: 10/11/2004 11:58:31 AM EST
I have a USP compact .40SW issue weapon. The government will also sell me a spare at a great discount to the retail price. Right now, I take my service weapon to the range and shoot 250 rounds each week. It works perfectly and hasn't been back to the shop since issued.

I wonder if I should buy the 2nd weapon for range work and not put the miles on my service weapon. I guess the flip side is that I know the service weapon is working well if I shoot it often. When it wears out, they'll just issue another one. I would just prefer it didn't fail in a combat situation.

Advice?
Link Posted: 10/11/2004 12:10:35 PM EST
I am sorry I can't say what kinda life you will get out of your Hk but I would assume it is way up there. When you are cleaning it just keep an eye out for wear.
If you can buy one for a cheap price I say get one, hell get 2 I'll take one off your hands
Link Posted: 10/11/2004 2:42:50 PM EST
As long as you're not using +P+ ammo, your USP will outlast you, IMO.
Link Posted: 10/11/2004 3:50:10 PM EST

Originally Posted By BobCole:
As long as you're not using +P+ ammo, your USP will outlast you, IMO.


No, the stuff I shoot at the range isn't close to hot. The duty ammo is, but the range stuff is light.

As an old wheel gun guy, I love the HK. Most often, when you have a bad attitude toward change, you're not going to like something new. This is one well built and reliable little handgun. Easy to use, groups well, and I've only had a couple of malfunctions in thousands of rounds (both related to a bad lot of ammo). I've learned to love my little USP Compact.
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 6:16:02 PM EST
Forever-need I say anymore
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 2:52:09 AM EST
Buy the "spare" while you can get a good price and shoot Hell out of the issue gun...they will replace it if it goes down, but not your own! I know several guys who carry a personal copy of the issue gun as a second, backup gun while on duty, but this is much easier to get away with if you are uniformed.

The .40 is pretty much a +P+ cartridge in standard form, pressure-wise with a "time/pressure curve" spike that goes almost straight up as soon as it is fired...which is the main reason the FBI wanted to use the downloaded 10mm rather than the .40 back before the .40 was as finalized as it is now. The full 10mm case allows for lower pressures at equal velocities and is easier to load up or down. Still, the Sig 229, and the H&K USP, in particular, were built around the .40, so you should have no serious issues with long term use. My feeling was...and still is, actually...that about every 10 years or so, an agency should look seriously at changing sidearms if for no other reasons than...a) it is less expensive and time consuming to trade for new ones than to repair and rework old ones, and... b) advances in design, etc. will tend to allow better and more efficient firearms and ammunition over that 10 year period, and these are tools we are speaking of, not works of art or collector's items. If there is a better and more efficient tool out there, then get it and use it provided it is proven, reliable, and affordable.
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 11:53:52 AM EST
A friend of mine has attended H&K Armorer school for the USP series pistols as well as the MP5. He says that the factory reps recommend replacing the plastic buffer on the guide rod at 20,000 rounds or so. If that is any indication of the service life of the rest of the gun, I would say it will outlast most shooters. Our SWAT Team carries the H&K full size .45, and they have had remarkably few problems with an average of 10,000 rounds fired per weapon.
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 12:05:56 PM EST

Originally Posted By pspencer:
A friend of mine has attended H&K Armorer school for the USP series pistols as well as the MP5. He says that the factory reps recommend replacing the plastic buffer on the guide rod at 20,000 rounds or so. If that is any indication of the service life of the rest of the gun, I would say it will outlast most shooters. Our SWAT Team carries the H&K full size .45, and they have had remarkably few problems with an average of 10,000 rounds fired per weapon.



IMHO 10,000 rounds is not a lot.......
If I shot my USP regularly (which I don't) I would have well over 30k by now. I normally shoot 200-300 rds per outing when I go. I used to go shooting 3 to 4 times a month. It adds up fast. I probably have about 6k through mine. No problems so far....

-John
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 12:44:27 PM EST
I suppose I should elaborate...the guns have over 10,000 rounds on average, with no visible loss in accuracy or function. Some finish wear, mostly from drawing and reholstering, but even that is minimal. The service life is obviously well beyond the number of rounds fired so far. The only major problem encountered with any of the guns was when a double loaded service round was fired. It cracked the frame and blew a small piece of it near the top of the grip right off. No damage whatsoever to the barrel, slide, or the shooter, which I found quite impressive. I agree that 10,000 rounds isn't much for most dedicated shooters. I only wish I had the time to shoot that much.
Link Posted: 10/23/2004 6:22:21 PM EST
I have right at 10K though my Compact 45, plus or minus 500 rounds and it still performs like the day I took it out of the box. I haven't replaced anything on it yet and there is no sign of anything needing replacement. Take half-way decent care of your pistol and I think it will outlast you.
Link Posted: 10/25/2004 4:33:18 PM EST
They say replace the plastic buffer on the compacts at 20k rounds....

...that should tell you what kind a reliability
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 3:36:58 AM EST
I fire 250 rounds/month through the weapon. I retire in 17 years. That's 51,000 rounds before I give it back. Then again, if it wears out, they fix it for free.

If I use my service weapon often at the range, I'll know of any problems it has rather than ops checking it in a combat situation. I think I'll buy the second weapon for $495 (includes night sights) since the deal is too good to pass up, but I wonder if I should just use the service weapon for range practice and not worry.
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 9:47:26 AM EST
DavidDetroit: HK polymer frames probably use similar the polymer frame technology of Glock, my old indoor range had a Glock 17 that went thru 500,000 rounds before breaking slide, was at 750,000 rounds on the original frame. My feeling is that you will have zero problems with your USP when you retire in 17 years.

Now if you have a old-tech HK P7M13, like the NJ State PD, they wore out their P7s, one of the few PDs that standardized on the P7s, they tried to have HK rebuild/refurb their P7, and since P7M13s was out of production and were going to charge them an arm & 2 legs, from what I understand switched to USPs because of costs.
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