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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/31/2010 7:57:42 PM EDT
Which is better without price being a concern?
Link Posted: 9/1/2010 4:11:02 AM EDT
There have been reports of peening on these barrels on 10/22s. No knowledge regarding PacLites on pistols, though.
Link Posted: 9/1/2010 4:41:00 AM EDT
Aluminum threads are always a bad idea IMHO.

After shooting my MkIII with my Outback and noticing the increased recoil due to the increased bolt velocity and back pressure I don't think I would use an aluminum upper.
Link Posted: 9/1/2010 5:57:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NoHarmNoFAL:
Aluminum threads are always a bad idea IMHO.

After shooting my MkIII with my Outback and noticing the increased recoil due to the increased bolt velocity and back pressure I don't think I would use an aluminum upper.


Seriously? In a 22? Seriously?
Link Posted: 9/2/2010 4:43:05 AM EDT
Originally Posted By coug91:

Originally Posted By NoHarmNoFAL:
Aluminum threads are always a bad idea IMHO.

After shooting my MkIII with my Outback and noticing the increased recoil due to the increased bolt velocity and back pressure I don't think I would use an aluminum upper.


Seriously? In a 22? Seriously?


I know it sounds silly but yes, there is a significant increase in bolt velocity on the blow back and that causes more of a recoil impulse. I have a dedicated suppressor host MkIII and I am going to have to keep an eye on the recoil spring to keep it from letting the bolt batter the receiver.
Link Posted: 9/2/2010 5:25:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By NoHarmNoFAL:
Originally Posted By coug91:

Originally Posted By NoHarmNoFAL:
Aluminum threads are always a bad idea IMHO.

After shooting my MkIII with my Outback and noticing the increased recoil due to the increased bolt velocity and back pressure I don't think I would use an aluminum upper.


Seriously? In a 22? Seriously?


I know it sounds silly but yes, there is a significant increase in bolt velocity on the blow back and that causes more of a recoil impulse. I have a dedicated suppressor host MkIII and I am going to have to keep an eye on the recoil spring to keep it from letting the bolt batter the receiver.


Learn something everyday.
Link Posted: 9/2/2010 6:25:51 AM EDT
Originally Posted By coug91:

Originally Posted By NoHarmNoFAL:
Originally Posted By coug91:

Originally Posted By NoHarmNoFAL:
Aluminum threads are always a bad idea IMHO.

After shooting my MkIII with my Outback and noticing the increased recoil due to the increased bolt velocity and back pressure I don't think I would use an aluminum upper.


Seriously? In a 22? Seriously?


I know it sounds silly but yes, there is a significant increase in bolt velocity on the blow back and that causes more of a recoil impulse. I have a dedicated suppressor host MkIII and I am going to have to keep an eye on the recoil spring to keep it from letting the bolt batter the receiver.


Learn something everyday.


It is not harsh by any means but it is noticeable.

Link Posted: 9/2/2010 4:26:27 PM EDT
I may get bashed for this but I hate the way the PacLites look
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 2:14:15 PM EDT
I have a 22/45 that I built. It uses a Ruger barrel that I bought from Gemtech. The front sight has been set back and the end of the barrel screws off to reveal the threads. The machine work is so good that you can't see a groove between the two parts. People that have shot the pistol don't even notice it. The four inch barrel provides a good balance to the pistol.

My two cents

Link Posted: 9/9/2010 1:22:26 PM EDT
Originally Posted By coug91:

Originally Posted By NoHarmNoFAL:
Aluminum threads are always a bad idea IMHO.

After shooting my MkIII with my Outback and noticing the increased recoil due to the increased bolt velocity and back pressure I don't think I would use an aluminum upper.


Seriously? In a 22? Seriously?


.22 LR autoloaders cycle via blowback––that is to say, the bolt is not locked. The only thing that holds the bolt closed in a .22 LR is spring pressure. A suppressor increases the pressure and also increases force applied to the bolt via gas pressure in the barrel. Adding weight to the bolt would negate the increased pressure created by the suppressor, but then the gun probably wouldn't function properly without the suppressor attached.
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