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Posted: 1/8/2011 7:26:18 PM EDT
Am interested in getting one. Sarco has the standard model for $360 & tactical model for $415.
Anyone with any experience to say yeah or nay on it?
Link Posted: 1/9/2011 1:27:06 PM EDT
I love mine. Inexpensive, works great.
Link Posted: 1/9/2011 4:47:14 PM EDT
I have the tactical. No problems in 700 rounds so far.
The tactical is well worth the extra cost.
Link Posted: 1/9/2011 5:45:05 PM EDT
I have a 9mm RIA Tactical. I changed out the trigger, barrel bushing,and sear, added a magwell, checkered front strap, and 5 ETM 10 round magazines (all Wilson parts). I then finished it off with a set of "take off" grips from my Springfield TRP. I am very happy with the results. I could have shot The Rock out of the box 'as is", but I like to tinker and wanted to make the changes for match shooting.

Just be aware that the "Novak Style" sights are not a true Novak cut. The front notch is cut deeper than spec (about .080+ instead of .075). The only company currently selling a compatable front sight is Dawson (fiber optic style).

As long as you are not expecting the fit and finish of a $1K+ or custom gun I say "go for it".
Link Posted: 1/10/2011 5:54:03 AM EDT
I have a 9mm TAC. I shoot it in IDPA, have made zero changes to it, and have only shot 115 grain ball. With that said it has had 2 failures in over 700 rounds. One was a loosely seated mag. I have no idea what caused the second one because I ran another 80 rounds through the same mags that same day with no issue. Maybe it was an imperfect round?

It is scary accurate. I don't understand why but it will shoot just as well as my more expensive 1911 (or any other pistol I have) benched.
Link Posted: 1/10/2011 10:30:28 AM EDT
A couple of USPSA shooters I know have them and think they represent a great value for the money.
Link Posted: 1/10/2011 10:33:18 AM EDT
For an inexpensive 9mm 1911 they are pretty good. I'm not sure if the newer models have ramped barrels, but if they didn't that would be my only concern. For the money I'd go with the tactical version.
Link Posted: 1/10/2011 10:36:42 AM EDT
Originally Posted By artsohc:
I'm not sure if the newer models have ramped barrels


My understanding is that, like the STI Spartan 9mm, they have unramped barrels.

Link Posted: 1/10/2011 1:20:11 PM EDT
My 1 year old 9mm TAC does NOT have a ramped barrel.
Link Posted: 1/11/2011 9:27:20 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ken_mays:
Originally Posted By artsohc:
I'm not sure if the newer models have ramped barrels


My understanding is that, like the STI Spartan 9mm, they have unramped barrels.



And it would only be a concern to me, not a deal breaker.
Link Posted: 1/11/2011 9:47:42 PM EDT
Originally Posted By artsohc:
Originally Posted By ken_mays:
Originally Posted By artsohc:
I'm not sure if the newer models have ramped barrels


My understanding is that, like the STI Spartan 9mm, they have unramped barrels.



And it would only be a concern to me, not a deal breaker.


Please educate me on the debate over ramped vs non ramped in a 9mm. I've seen this issue brought up several times but haven't seen it explained. ty
Link Posted: 1/12/2011 3:53:53 AM EDT
Originally Posted By GO4SHOOT:
Originally Posted By artsohc:
Originally Posted By ken_mays:
Originally Posted By artsohc:
I'm not sure if the newer models have ramped barrels
My understanding is that, like the STI Spartan 9mm, they have unramped barrels.
And it would only be a concern to me, not a deal breaker.
Please educate me on the debate over ramped vs non ramped in a 9mm. I've seen this issue brought up several times but haven't seen it explained. ty
Same here.
Also was told that I could swap out barrels & mags to have it shoot .38 Super.

Link Posted: 1/12/2011 4:09:25 AM EDT
Originally Posted By wganz:
Originally Posted By GO4SHOOT:
Originally Posted By artsohc:
Originally Posted By ken_mays:
Originally Posted By artsohc:
I'm not sure if the newer models have ramped barrels
My understanding is that, like the STI Spartan 9mm, they have unramped barrels.
And it would only be a concern to me, not a deal breaker.
Please educate me on the debate over ramped vs non ramped in a 9mm. I've seen this issue brought up several times but haven't seen it explained. ty
Same here.
Also was told that I could swap out barrels & mags to have it shoot .38 Super.



Okay ! I like that last part.Been wanting another super in 1911.
Link Posted: 1/12/2011 5:02:17 AM EDT
I have a question about this pistol: does it use a proprietary magazine, or is it a type that might be ordered from Brownell's or other usual source?

I have a phobia about having a firearm and not enough magazines....
Link Posted: 1/12/2011 5:26:39 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Tirador223:
I have a question about this pistol: does it use a proprietary magazine, or is it a type that might be ordered from Brownell's or other usual source?

I have a phobia about having a firearm and not enough magazines....


I run both Wilson and Tripp mags in mine. It comes with a Checkmate.
Link Posted: 1/12/2011 5:17:46 PM EDT
I use Checkmates in mine.
Link Posted: 1/12/2011 7:26:57 PM EDT
Originally Posted By GO4SHOOT:
Please educate me on the debate over ramped vs non ramped in a 9mm. I've seen this issue brought up several times but haven't seen it explained. ty


Original .38 Super and 9mm Colt guns were in unramped configuration. As IPSC grew, competitors began to increase the power of the .38 Super loads in order to meet the minimum power floor. They exceeded the factory specifications for the cartridge, which led to case head blowouts.

Since .38 Super in a competition gun was too good an idea to drop, several barrel makers began to build a fully ramped barrel, similar to the Browning High Power's integral feedramp. This allowed more case head support, and also featured stronger lower lugs to hold up to the hotter loads.

Another feature was that since the feedramp was integral to the barrel, it eliminated the worry over whether a given frame had .38 or .45 frame feed ramp cuts. Frames cut for a ramped barrel are much easily switched between different calibers.

One downside to a ramped barrel is that it offers a steeper angle of ramp for the cartridge to climb, compared to an unramped barrel. This can mean feeding problems with some mags in some guns. Some experimentation may be required to get a reliable mag that will point the cartridge high enough to avoid nosedives.

Ramped barrels are only really necessary if you'll be shooting hotter-than-standard loads. It's a good idea in higher pressure cartridges like .40 S&W as well. If all you'll ever shoot is factory ammo or moderate handloads, unramped 9mm and .38 Super barrels work fine.

There are two main categories of ramped barrels: Wilson/Nowlin and Clark/Para. The lower lug profiles and corresponding frame modifications are different. Know which one you have if you are going to buy another barrel. Springfield and Kimbers generally use the Wilson/Nowlin configuration. I believe Para Ordnance is the only production 1911 that uses their cut, but it's popular among custom competition guns.



Link Posted: 1/13/2011 8:15:55 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ken_mays:
Originally Posted By GO4SHOOT:
Please educate me on the debate over ramped vs non ramped in a 9mm. I've seen this issue brought up several times but haven't seen it explained. ty


Original .38 Super and 9mm Colt guns were in unramped configuration. As IPSC grew, competitors began to increase the power of the .38 Super loads in order to meet the minimum power floor. They exceeded the factory specifications for the cartridge, which led to case head blowouts.

Since .38 Super in a competition gun was too good an idea to drop, several barrel makers began to build a fully ramped barrel, similar to the Browning High Power's integral feedramp. This allowed more case head support, and also featured stronger lower lugs to hold up to the hotter loads.

Another feature was that since the feedramp was integral to the barrel, it eliminated the worry over whether a given frame had .38 or .45 frame feed ramp cuts. Frames cut for a ramped barrel are much easily switched between different calibers.

One downside to a ramped barrel is that it offers a steeper angle of ramp for the cartridge to climb, compared to an unramped barrel. This can mean feeding problems with some mags in some guns. Some experimentation may be required to get a reliable mag that will point the cartridge high enough to avoid nosedives.

Ramped barrels are only really necessary if you'll be shooting hotter-than-standard loads. It's a good idea in higher pressure cartridges like .40 S&W as well. If all you'll ever shoot is factory ammo or moderate handloads, unramped 9mm and .38 Super barrels work fine.

There are two main categories of ramped barrels: Wilson/Nowlin and Clark/Para. The lower lug profiles and corresponding frame modifications are different. Know which one you have if you are going to buy another barrel. Springfield and Kimbers generally use the Wilson/Nowlin configuration. I believe Para Ordnance is the only production 1911 that uses their cut, but it's popular among custom competition guns.

http://i241.photobucket.com/albums/ff35/kemays/ramped-barrels-1.jpg http://i241.photobucket.com/albums/ff35/kemays/ramped-barrels-2.jpg

http://i241.photobucket.com/albums/ff35/kemays/ramped-barrels-3.jpg


Awesome answer. Thank you. Looks like I don't need a ramped barrel.
Link Posted: 1/14/2011 4:54:27 PM EDT
I bought my RIA 9mm Tactical to be used in IDPA ESP Division with FMJ round nose hand loads at 130 PF (mouse farts). The unramped barrel is fine for my needs and feeds perfectly with my Wilson ETM 10 round magazine. I did have to replace the FLGR with a GI set up because my new G10 grips put the gun over the maximum ESP division weight of 43 oz. I have to say shooting light 9mm loads out of a 43 ounce 1911 is a kin to shooting high power 22s. Not a lot of recoil compared to my 25 ounce Glock G34

BTW- Twenty some years ago I owned a Colt 1911 in 9mm and the unramped barrel worked fine in that gun as well. Now, if I were to build a single or double stack gun for 38 Super or 9mm Major I would want a ramped barrel with lots of support.
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 11:48:28 AM EDT
I purchased a RIA 9MM about 6 months ago. Less than $400 including shipping and transfer fee. I also purchased 2 Metalform and 1 MecGar mags for it. All 4 mags (including the original) have been flawless so far. Approx 300 rounds through her.

I was also pretty amazed at the accuracy from this gun. I must say for $400, this is a great purchase. I kind of wish i would have gotten the Tactical model, but I love this one.

I planned to do some tinkering with it, and just have not gotten around to it. Frankly, it needs nothing.
Link Posted: 2/2/2011 3:33:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/2/2011 3:36:24 PM EDT by wwynter]
Originally Posted By wmspdi:
I have a 9mm RIA Tactical. I changed out the trigger, barrel bushing,and sear, added a magwell, checkered front strap, and 5 ETM 10 round magazines (all Wilson parts). I then finished it off with a set of "take off" grips from my Springfield TRP. I am very happy with the results. I could have shot The Rock out of the box 'as is", but I like to tinker and wanted to make the changes for match shooting.

Just be aware that the "Novak Style" sights are not a true Novak cut. The front notch is cut deeper than spec (about .080+ instead of .075). The only company currently selling a compatable front sight is Dawson (fiber optic style).

As long as you are not expecting the fit and finish of a $1K+ or custom gun I say "go for it".


Anyone know the specs on the rear site ? I'm about to pick up one of these,and would like to maybe change the rear site or at least know if I have the option.
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