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Posted: 8/23/2015 5:25:17 PM EDT
I've got a colt 1911 (actually series 80 1991) with the flat mainspring housing and want the arched one.
Is the housing all I need, or do springs have to be replaced as well.
I realize to 1911 aficionados this may be a stupid question, but I have no pride.
Link Posted: 8/23/2015 5:29:19 PM EDT
just the housing, swap all the old parts into the new one.  
Link Posted: 8/23/2015 5:34:00 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By K1rodeoboater:
just the housing, swap all the old parts into the new one.  
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Thanks! A good friend is going to do it for me, so its good to know that's all I need to bring.
Link Posted: 8/24/2015 9:08:38 PM EDT
Easiest would be to order all the parts and build a new one...mainspring housing, mainspring, mainspring plunger, mainspring cap, mainspring retaining pin. It shouldn't cost you more than $20-$30 for all the parts plus the MSH.

This way if you want to switch back and forth, you can, without you needing a vice and tools and 20 minutes...
Link Posted: 8/24/2015 9:44:24 PM EDT
Changing a MSH is one of the easiest "mods" you can make for a 1911, right after changing out the grips.  

If you feel more comfortable in having your friend to it, by all means, do that.  Watching a youtube video would suffice though.
Link Posted: 8/24/2015 9:51:33 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Evil_Ed:
Easiest would be to order all the parts and build a new one...mainspring housing, mainspring, mainspring plunger, mainspring cap, mainspring retaining pin. It shouldn't cost you more than $20-$30 for all the parts plus the MSH.

This way if you want to switch back and forth, you can, without you needing a vice and tools and 20 minutes...
View Quote


How is buying all that stuff easier than depressing the mainspring, poking out the retaining pin, dumping everything out, and stuffing it all in the new MSH??  Putting it together is the hardest part....
Link Posted: 8/25/2015 5:23:33 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By samuse:


How is buying all that stuff easier than depressing the mainspring, poking out the retaining pin, dumping everything out, and stuffing it all in the new MSH??  Putting it together is the hardest part....
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Originally Posted By samuse:
Originally Posted By Evil_Ed:
Easiest would be to order all the parts and build a new one...mainspring housing, mainspring, mainspring plunger, mainspring cap, mainspring retaining pin. It shouldn't cost you more than $20-$30 for all the parts plus the MSH.

This way if you want to switch back and forth, you can, without you needing a vice and tools and 20 minutes...


How is buying all that stuff easier than depressing the mainspring, poking out the retaining pin, dumping everything out, and stuffing it all in the new MSH??  Putting it together is the hardest part....



You answered your own question...how is disassembling and then reassembling a mainspring housing easier than buying a second set of parts and putting it together once, so whenever you decide to swap housings, you don't have to go through all the BS of rebuilding it? Never mind needing a padded vice to do it properly, etc. Yes you can do it on a tabletop with just your hands but if you launch the spring/plunger, or lose the retaining pin, good luck finding them again.
Link Posted: 8/25/2015 8:19:53 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Evil_Ed:



You answered your own question...how is disassembling and then reassembling a mainspring housing easier than buying a second set of parts and putting it together once, so whenever you decide to swap housings, you don't have to go through all the BS of rebuilding it? Never mind needing a padded vice to do it properly, etc. Yes you can do it on a tabletop with just your hands but if you launch the spring/plunger, or lose the retaining pin, good luck finding them again.
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Originally Posted By Evil_Ed:
Originally Posted By samuse:
Originally Posted By Evil_Ed:
Easiest would be to order all the parts and build a new one...mainspring housing, mainspring, mainspring plunger, mainspring cap, mainspring retaining pin. It shouldn't cost you more than $20-$30 for all the parts plus the MSH.

This way if you want to switch back and forth, you can, without you needing a vice and tools and 20 minutes...


How is buying all that stuff easier than depressing the mainspring, poking out the retaining pin, dumping everything out, and stuffing it all in the new MSH??  Putting it together is the hardest part....



You answered your own question...how is disassembling and then reassembling a mainspring housing easier than buying a second set of parts and putting it together once, so whenever you decide to swap housings, you don't have to go through all the BS of rebuilding it? Never mind needing a padded vice to do it properly, etc. Yes you can do it on a tabletop with just your hands but if you launch the spring/plunger, or lose the retaining pin, good luck finding them again.


Changing a 1911 MSH and it's internals out should take no more than a couple minutes without the need for a vice. I couldn't even count how many times I've done it.

OP just buy the MSH and have your friend change it out. There's no hassle in doing it again if you want to go back to the old one.
Link Posted: 8/25/2015 8:30:28 AM EDT

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Originally Posted By Evil_Ed:
Yes you can do it on a tabletop with just your hands but if you launch the spring/plunger, or lose the retaining pin, good luck finding them again.
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Originally Posted By Evil_Ed:



Originally Posted By samuse:


Originally Posted By Evil_Ed:

Easiest would be to order all the parts and build a new one...mainspring housing, mainspring, mainspring plunger, mainspring cap, mainspring retaining pin. It shouldn't cost you more than $20-$30 for all the parts plus the MSH.



This way if you want to switch back and forth, you can, without you needing a vice and tools and 20 minutes...




How is buying all that stuff easier than depressing the mainspring, poking out the retaining pin, dumping everything out, and stuffing it all in the new MSH??  Putting it together is the hardest part....







Yes you can do it on a tabletop with just your hands but if you launch the spring/plunger, or lose the retaining pin, good luck finding them again.




 
Do it inside a clear plastic bag. That's what I do whenever I am working with tiny springs and detente that have a tendency to fly away. Takes less time and doesn't require anything special beyond the normal tools.
Link Posted: 8/25/2015 8:34:53 AM EDT
Drive a small nail into a 2x4 and leave about an inch or so sticking up.   Place 2x4 on the bench, grab a straightened paperclip in one hand.   Press mainspring cap against the nail, compressing the spring and allowing you to poke out the cap retainer pin with the paperclip.   Raise the MSH slowly and the 3 parts inside will fall out.
Link Posted: 8/25/2015 6:04:14 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Evil_Ed:



You answered your own question...how is disassembling and then reassembling a mainspring housing easier than buying a second set of parts and putting it together once, so whenever you decide to swap housings, you don't have to go through all the BS of rebuilding it? Never mind needing a padded vice to do it properly, etc. Yes you can do it on a tabletop with just your hands but if you launch the spring/plunger, or lose the retaining pin, good luck finding them again.
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Originally Posted By Evil_Ed:
Originally Posted By samuse:
Originally Posted By Evil_Ed:
Easiest would be to order all the parts and build a new one...mainspring housing, mainspring, mainspring plunger, mainspring cap, mainspring retaining pin. It shouldn't cost you more than $20-$30 for all the parts plus the MSH.

This way if you want to switch back and forth, you can, without you needing a vice and tools and 20 minutes...


How is buying all that stuff easier than depressing the mainspring, poking out the retaining pin, dumping everything out, and stuffing it all in the new MSH??  Putting it together is the hardest part....



You answered your own question...how is disassembling and then reassembling a mainspring housing easier than buying a second set of parts and putting it together once, so whenever you decide to swap housings, you don't have to go through all the BS of rebuilding it? Never mind needing a padded vice to do it properly, etc. Yes you can do it on a tabletop with just your hands but if you launch the spring/plunger, or lose the retaining pin, good luck finding them again.


I'd rather spend 20 seconds popping a MSH apart than buying $20 of parts I don't need.
Link Posted: 8/26/2015 9:21:17 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Evil_Ed:
Easiest would be to order all the parts and build a new one...mainspring housing, mainspring, mainspring plunger, mainspring cap, mainspring retaining pin. It shouldn't cost you more than $20-$30 for all the parts plus the MSH.

This way if you want to switch back and forth, you can, without you needing a vice and tools and 20 minutes...
View Quote


20 minutes you are doing it all wrong.  It should take no longer than 1 minute to take down and no longer than a minute to assemble.  We are not assembling a flux capacitor and wiring up a Mr Fusion.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 12:42:47 AM EDT
Here is my mainspring tool screwed to my desk.

Link Posted: 9/3/2015 5:37:54 PM EDT
My neighbor/friend has a lot of experience with the 1911.  Put on the MSH and extended
Wilson safety.  Runs like a champ.

Link Posted: 9/3/2015 8:21:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/3/2015 8:22:16 PM EDT by JJREA]
Do you actually like an arched better now that you have it on there?    I've ever really liked them.  And on a GI type gun they make depressing the grip safety just that much more difficult when trying to draw fast.  With a beavertail, no big deal.  Not sure about those Colt ones like you have for the ringed hammer.

That's a nice pistol though!
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