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Posted: 4/17/2016 11:53:56 AM EDT
Mods, If this is in the wrong place, please move. I didn't find anything in he gun-smithing section. I was hoping someone with experience could help me out. My 42 nd 43 have horrible triggers. Ghost Edge connectors are on their way along with news sights. So I have been reading about polishing up a few key trigger locations. Rather than turn this into a "do it"/"don't do it" post, I would like to hear from others that have. I am aware of where I need to polish, how to polish and feel confident in my efforts and skills. My main question is that most people recommend using Flitz or Mother's chrome polish. Well, I am a bit more technical than that. I have diamond polishing paste from 3.0 - 0.125 microns. I can not, for the life of me, cross reference the abrasiveness of those two commercial products to what I have. Nor does Glock advertise its hardness level for its trigger parts. Since polishing is intended to smooth rather than cut material, I just wanted to make sure I am starting with the correct polishing paste.

Does anyone know what micron paste works best on the Glock assemblies?



Thanks in advance!



Link Posted: 4/17/2016 2:06:11 PM EDT
I am of the group that does not polish because shooting the pistol will accomplish the same thing as polishing. 500 rounds and all the contact areas and metal to metal will mate.

Link Posted: 4/17/2016 3:00:36 PM EDT
Here is my dilemma. For the price of 500 rounds, I can purchase some nice upgraded parts (or even upgrade the gun). As it sits, my G27 w/ a 3.5 Ghost connector is making 5-8" groups at 45-50' and 3-4" groups at 20-25' using target ammo.....and I am no expert. I can't even hit the (15" x 15") paper at 20' with my G42. I pull it back to 10' and the pattern is all over the paper, so I can't blame the sights; maybe just me and my trigger control. I'd like to add the Ghost connector, better sights, and polish so I have more time mastering the factory trigger pull. I understand every firearm is different, but this pocket gun is making me look bad . I thought the lower recoil would make it more accurate. Love the size, but hate the way it shoots.
Link Posted: 4/17/2016 3:04:32 PM EDT
I polished, dry fired a 1k times and shot 700 rounds through my 19 when I first got it. Get all three. It will make you a better shot. Learning good trigger control is invaluable.
Link Posted: 4/17/2016 3:31:29 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By keith13b:
Here is my dilemma. For the price of 500 rounds, I can purchase some nice upgraded parts (or even upgrade the gun). As it sits, my G27 w/ a 3.5 Ghost connector is making 5-8" groups at 45-50' and 3-4" groups at 20-25' using target ammo.....and I am no expert. I can't even hit the (15" x 15") paper at 20' with my G42. I pull it back to 10' and the pattern is all over the paper, so I can't blame the sights; maybe just me and my trigger control. I'd like to add the Ghost connector, better sights, and polish so I have more time mastering the factory trigger pull. I understand every firearm is different, but this pocket gun is making me look bad . I thought the lower recoil would make it more accurate. Love the size, but hate the way it shoots.
View Quote


Dry fire practice more.
Link Posted: 4/17/2016 3:59:10 PM EDT
I've used Mothers w/ a micro fiber towel. The triggers in the 42 and 43 are terrible and you aren't going to polish you're way into a better feeling trigger.
Link Posted: 4/17/2016 8:35:34 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By gp55445:
I've used Mothers w/ a micro fiber towel. The triggers in the 42 and 43 are terrible and you aren't going to polish you're way into a better feeling trigger.
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I did super fine sandpaper on the contact points then went at it with polish wheel and compound on dremel it improved slightly but I still ended up putting a Edge connector in and that made it a lot nicer. This was on a G42.
Link Posted: 4/17/2016 9:34:59 PM EDT
Shooting hundreds or rounds will break in your trigger but not to polish effectiveness really
And why not just polish it from the get go and have a nice broken in trigger to begin with
Link Posted: 4/17/2016 10:49:19 PM EDT
I Polish mine right off the bat....but I'm a tinker, I can't leave anything alone.
Link Posted: 4/17/2016 11:05:02 PM EDT
I polished the trigger bar and plunger, put in a ghost connector and dropped my 42 from 7 and a half pounds to 4.
Link Posted: 4/18/2016 4:40:54 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By EdgecrusherXES:
I am of the group that does not polish because shooting the pistol will accomplish the same thing as polishing. 500 rounds and all the contact areas and metal to metal will mate.

View Quote


Somewhere around 8,000 to 9,000 rounds in and my trigger was still hard and gritty. Yeah the polish job was worth it and I could tell a difference right away at how smooth it was. Then I dropped in a 4.5lb connector and the 6lb trigger return spring and have a nice trigger that's 100 % reliable and I'm happy with.
Link Posted: 4/18/2016 4:55:54 AM EDT
Almost hate to use the word, but Dremel with cotton wheels and their polishing compound works pretty good.

Link Posted: 4/18/2016 9:24:34 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By EdgecrusherXES:
I am of the group that does not polish because shooting the pistol will accomplish the same thing as polishing. 500 rounds and all the contact areas and metal to metal will mate.

View Quote


This. I don't have time for arts and crafts, I'd rather be dry firing or live firing. If you get super impatient, many companies off pre-polished components.
Link Posted: 4/18/2016 11:17:04 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By whiplash10:


This. I don't have time for arts and crafts, I'd rather be dry firing or live firing. If you get super impatient, many companies off pre-polished components.
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Originally Posted By whiplash10:
Originally Posted By EdgecrusherXES:
I am of the group that does not polish because shooting the pistol will accomplish the same thing as polishing. 500 rounds and all the contact areas and metal to metal will mate.



This. I don't have time for arts and crafts, I'd rather be dry firing or live firing. If you get super impatient, many companies off pre-polished components.


I have done the polishing and could never feel any significant difference. I bought recently a G19.4 and G23.4 I polished the G23 just to try it and side by side I could not feel a difference. The biggest difference I felt was as the G19 got miles on it then everything started feeling better and smoother.
Link Posted: 4/18/2016 12:15:19 PM EDT
I polished my G34, the only thing I learned from it was just how spongy the second stage was. Ghost 3.5 Ultimate helped that, along with a Wolf trigger spring.
Link Posted: 4/18/2016 12:41:22 PM EDT
I use a Dremel with felt wheel and Mothers Mag Polish. I polish the trigger bar, saftey plunger, connector, and feed ramp.

Dave N
Link Posted: 4/18/2016 12:57:38 PM EDT
if youre just going to be sitting around watching tv , polishing for a hour is a great idea
Link Posted: 4/18/2016 7:41:00 PM EDT
Five min with a creytex wheel and a ghost connector, no need to polish more
Link Posted: 4/18/2016 8:12:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/18/2016 8:14:04 PM EDT by drok556]
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Originally Posted By shadowcop:
I use a Dremel with felt wheel and Mothers Mag Polish. I polish the trigger bar, saftey plunger, connector, and feed ramp.

Dave N
View Quote


This except with meguires polish. Also put in the ghost inc ranger 4.5 trigger kit. Can't wait to shoot it.. now all I want is a different shoe the stock g4 trigger shoe isn't to my liking haha.

Every one I know that polishes gun parts uses either mothers or meguires polish. They both work great
Link Posted: 4/18/2016 10:42:08 PM EDT
Can someone show what is being polished. Do I have to worry about keeping angles flat? I bought my first Glock last week (G43) and I am not yet familiar with the trigger workings. I have just over 100 rounds through it and feel the trigger has a lot to be desired. I have a Ghost connecter on the way.
Link Posted: 4/18/2016 10:56:40 PM EDT
25 cent trigger job, look up on youtube. I used Flitz. Worked great on all my glocks.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 12:46:45 PM EDT
Well, I decided to do the polish job......and I know what, and what not, to polish. For those reading this, I researched on You Tube and saw a lot of bad advice being given. Like, a lot! So be very careful.

I went with the Ghost Edge connector as it is tried and true, and left that alone. I used 0.50 micron grit and finished with 0.25 grit. Didn't see a need to use any finer as it was like a mirror already. Polished the safety plunger and trigger arm. Left the feed ramps alone. Used a piece of glass (as a flat surface) to polish the flat edges so they stay flat.

Pulling the trigger now is amazing and I can't wait to hit the range. Just dry firing it, makes it feel like a whole new gun. Well worth the time spent! I would only recommend someone who knows the basics of the trigger and how it works to do this.

Link Posted: 4/19/2016 1:26:59 PM EDT
I've polished up quite a few Glocks, even against my recommendation not to and I've never really felt like it improved anything or even made a noticeable difference.

The major downside to polishing is that the trigger bar/connector interface becomes more lube sensitive. Polishing smooths the parts, increasing the faying surfaces, in turn increasing friction, which increases the chance of galling those parts together.

I HAVE seen galled parts due to polishing, and have never seen a benefit, so I'm not a fan...
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 2:41:33 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By samuse:
I've polished up quite a few Glocks, even against my recommendation not to and I've never really felt like it improved anything or even made a noticeable difference.

The major downside to polishing is that the trigger bar/connector interface becomes more lube sensitive. Polishing smooths the parts, increasing the faying surfaces, in turn increasing friction, which increases the chance of galling those parts together.

I HAVE seen galled parts due to polishing, and have never seen a benefit, so I'm not a fan...
View Quote


You and I are in the same boat for the most part polishing is a waste of time especially when I can dry fire practice while I watch TV and have the parts mate to themselves. One thing I do do is take down the parts and remove burs and leftover excess metal from the stamping process. My G32 was pitting my drop safety plunger because of a bur left over from the factory. My G19 on the end of the trigger bar where it interfaces with the connector had a bur you could feel through the trigger. Few seconds with an emory cloth and it was gone and that is about the extent of modifying the internals that I do.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:27:13 PM EDT
I did a .25 cent trigger job on a gen 2 g22 and a new gen3 g27. Put them back together to function test them and thought meh. Took them apart and lubed them. Holy crap what a difference it made!
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 8:01:47 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By JKrammes:
Can someone show what is being polished. Do I have to worry about keeping angles flat? I bought my first Glock last week (G43) and I am not yet familiar with the trigger workings. I have just over 100 rounds through it and feel the trigger has a lot to be desired. I have a Ghost connecter on the way.
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Try the Ghost connector first. It could very well be enough for you.
I polish the entire trigger bar but you could just polish the contact points at the connector or cruciform.

If you use Mothers Mag Polish, it doesn't remove enough metal to change anything so far as angles. But I suppose someone could go apeshit with it.

Dave N
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 12:16:53 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By EdgecrusherXES:


You and I are in the same boat for the most part polishing is a waste of time especially when I can dry fire practice while I watch TV and have the parts mate to themselves. One thing I do do is take down the parts and remove burs and leftover excess metal from the stamping process. My G32 was pitting my drop safety plunger because of a bur left over from the factory. My G19 on the end of the trigger bar where it interfaces with the connector had a bur you could feel through the trigger. Few seconds with an emory cloth and it was gone and that is about the extent of modifying the internals that I do.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By EdgecrusherXES:
Originally Posted By samuse:
I've polished up quite a few Glocks, even against my recommendation not to and I've never really felt like it improved anything or even made a noticeable difference.

The major downside to polishing is that the trigger bar/connector interface becomes more lube sensitive. Polishing smooths the parts, increasing the faying surfaces, in turn increasing friction, which increases the chance of galling those parts together.

I HAVE seen galled parts due to polishing, and have never seen a benefit, so I'm not a fan...


You and I are in the same boat for the most part polishing is a waste of time especially when I can dry fire practice while I watch TV and have the parts mate to themselves. One thing I do do is take down the parts and remove burs and leftover excess metal from the stamping process. My G32 was pitting my drop safety plunger because of a bur left over from the factory. My G19 on the end of the trigger bar where it interfaces with the connector had a bur you could feel through the trigger. Few seconds with an emory cloth and it was gone and that is about the extent of modifying the internals that I do.


Yes sir. Stoning burrs left over from the stamping/shearing of the trigger bar is the best thing to improve the feel of the trigger *if* it needs it. I use a very fine ceramic stone and do the same things you do. I generally don't mess with the cruciform as it needs a little roughness.

My four personal Glocks have completely untouched trigger parts.
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