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Posted: 12/2/2002 9:00:40 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/2/2002 11:32:06 AM EST by kato4moto]
Finally augmented my 1911s with a Glock 19. I'd been reluctant to because in the past, I just didn't find the trigger appealing. However, from what I'd heard and read, it just made sense to get a size-efficient 9mm, and the 19 seemed to be about the best.

So, I went out and shot it Saturday afternoon and then again at a steel plate match on Sunday morning.

I sucked!

The 19 is easy to shoot, but I just couldn't hit anything with it reliably. It's nothing like my 1911s or the three Springfield XDs (9mm, .40 S&W, .357 Sig) I've tried at the same range. (Edited to add: The slide also sliced the skin between my thumb and index finger a couple times, making me wish for a 1911-style beavertail.)

I noticed that when dry-firing the 19 in the weeks before I got to go out and shoot it, I couldn't keep it from moving to the left when stroking the trigger with the tip of my index finger. Making contact closer to the middle of the pad in the finger seemed to make the front sight rise straight up instead of to the left. Actual shooting simply confirmed what dry-firing predicted and left me frustrated.

I've dumped too much money into the 19 with mags, ammo, holster and pouches to get rid of it. Thus, I've resigned myself to keeping it.

My question is, is there hope for me with the 19? What am I doing wrong? Can I learn to hit with it as well as I do with 1911s (and XDs that I've used but don't own) before I go broke? TIA for any helpful advice.
Link Posted: 12/2/2002 9:40:11 AM EST
Quote
[ I noticed that when dry-firing the 19 in the weeks before I got to go out and shoot it, I couldn't keep it from moving to the left when stroking the trigger with the tip of my index finger.]

Try more finger on the trigger, to little and you will tend to shoot left, to much and you will shoot to the right. When dry firing notice how it moves with diffrent finger positions. You will have to find your sweet spot.
Link Posted: 12/2/2002 12:10:12 PM EST
Try the 3.5 connector they helped me a lot!

Put them in all 4 of my Glocks.
Link Posted: 12/2/2002 1:18:49 PM EST
This is a common problem, and one that I experienced when going from all my glocks into trying a 1911. Don't forget that the grip angle is different, so for an experienced shooter like yourself your muscle memory is used to a 1911. Your habit will be to hold the gun with your wrist at your normal angle, this will hold the barrel at a different angle than true. Also, switching from a single stack to a double stack means a lot more grip in your grasp. Align your arm on a vertical line and see if your Glock remains as straight as your 1911's. Your best bet is to get some snap caps and dry fire a few dozen times before a shooting session. This can be a chore with a hammerless gun, I know, but you should see some improvement.

Link Posted: 12/2/2002 1:53:03 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/2/2002 1:54:16 PM EST by Wipeout]
The secret with any firearm is to practice with it and get to know it. This is especially true with Glock Pistols as they are a very unique breed.
Link Posted: 12/2/2002 2:02:34 PM EST

Grip the pistol and slide your hand up until the skin between the index and thumb makes one or two wrinkles.
See if that helps with the cutting.
I have to hold it different than my Kimber because of the B-tail or lack of.I still try to hold as high as I can.
GLOCK23
Link Posted: 12/2/2002 2:44:11 PM EST

Originally Posted By DallmannTodd:
This is a common problem, and one that I experienced when going from all my glocks into trying a 1911. Don't forget that the grip angle is different, so for an experienced shooter like yourself your muscle memory is used to a 1911. Your habit will be to hold the gun with your wrist at your normal angle, this will hold the barrel at a different angle than true. Also, switching from a single stack to a double stack means a lot more grip in your grasp. Align your arm on a vertical line and see if your Glock remains as straight as your 1911's. Your best bet is to get some snap caps and dry fire a few dozen times before a shooting session. This can be a chore with a hammerless gun, I know, but you should see some improvement.




No need for snap caps with a Glock, just dry fire away, will not hurt a thing.
Link Posted: 12/8/2002 12:06:07 AM EST
kato4moto, forsake your 1911 for a while and shoot only your Glock 19. After shooting it a lot you will be okay. I have very large hands and I have never been sliced by a Glock slide. I assume you shoot your 1911 with a very high hold. Therefore adjust your hold on the Glock to avoid it. My opine is that you have purchased the most size efficient service 9mm made. Regards, Richard:-)
Link Posted: 12/19/2002 8:00:30 AM EST
Practice, practice, practice.

While dry firing, balance a dime on the front sight. You should be able to pull the trigger without it falling off.
Link Posted: 12/19/2002 8:27:10 AM EST

Originally Posted By desertdiver:
Practice, practice, practice.

While dry firing, balance a dime on the front sight. You should be able to pull the trigger without it falling off.



Your kidding right? The Glock slide is flat
Link Posted: 12/19/2002 8:35:44 AM EST
midwesttraininggroup.com/tips.htm

good articles here on trigger control and grip
Link Posted: 12/19/2002 9:13:40 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/19/2002 9:15:23 AM EST by GLOCKshooter]
Pull the trigger part way back, until all the slack is out, make sure you still have a sight picture, then pull it past the click. After it fires, only let the trigger travel forward until you feel the click. You will have no slack to take up on this shot. Basically single action from here on out.

That's the most effective single thing. Others: 3.5 lb connector, polish all surfaces of the trigger group that touch each other, use two hands to shoot, with both thumbs along the left side of the frame, both pointed at the target, roll your shoulders forward, lean into the gun a little, cant it ever so slightly counter clockwise (not gangster lean, just a touch.
Link Posted: 12/19/2002 9:41:11 AM EST
Practice
(not really a secret, more like a frequently overlooked axiom)
Link Posted: 12/19/2002 1:37:59 PM EST

Originally Posted By Slacker:

Originally Posted By desertdiver:
Practice, practice, practice.

While dry firing, balance a dime on the front sight. You should be able to pull the trigger without it falling off.



Your kidding right? The Glock slide is flat hr


Most glocks have a front sight post. Maybe you should look into getting one.
Link Posted: 12/23/2002 1:55:42 AM EST
The web on my right hand (between index finger and thumb) still has scars from where my Glock 23 bit me with the slide.
If you have a Gen III (with the finger grooves) and you find it uncomfortable then I suggest a little Dremel surgery is in order.
I no longer have the slide biting me problem.

Link Posted: 1/2/2003 11:24:48 AM EST
Practice is the key but Glocks do feel and point different than most pistols because of the grip angle. Its not bad, just different. I carry a G35 on duty and own several others. One thing that helped alot was a grip reduction by Arizona Response Systems ($135). I have short fingers and for me it was well worth it. The basic reduction includes several other bells and whistles that Robar and others don't include. I was so happy with it I had a 19 and 34 done also. My 34 and 35 each have in excess of 15,000 rds through them with no wear to the finish on the grip. It also makes the glock feel more like other pistols if you shoot different guns. Check out the website , they have pretty good pics. (www.arizonaresponsesystems.com)
Glocks, you either love em or hate em! I love em!
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