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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/26/2005 8:55:27 PM EDT
grease or liquid lube on a G22?
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 9:56:13 PM EDT
Both.

Oil on the slide and barrel...VERY small amount as per the manual

Grease on the connector where it contacts the trigger bar....VERY small amount

Glocks don't need much to work correctly.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 10:10:30 PM EDT
If you have to choose one or the other, use oil. I pretty much do what HotRod9mm does. GLOCKS are not picky about what type of gun oil is used just remember that they don't need much...less is more.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 11:14:28 PM EDT
Why so little?
I know they are meant to run with a very small amount of oil, but I (accidentally) put a full drop on the trigger bar/connector oil point every time.

Thick headed I guess.
Link Posted: 8/27/2005 12:47:43 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/27/2005 12:54:38 AM EDT by clubsoda22]
I can lube the entire gun with an oil saturated end of a q-tip.

A thin coat on the following points:
Link Posted: 8/27/2005 3:06:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By clubsoda22:
I can lube the entire gun with an oil saturated end of a q-tip.

A thin coat on the following points:
glockmeister.com/images/lubing.jpg

I ended up using oil. I have both (tetra). I'm used to less being more. My USPSA club has a few very dusty bays, so any excess lube becomes mud. Especially in mags. We have guys use graphite powder, some use none, some risk a light shot of spray, it's caused everyone problems one way or another. The only people that shoot glocks that have problems are people that fuck with the internals a lot and do it themselves. I've got the extended releases but that's it. And they were not an option, there were a necessity.
Link Posted: 8/27/2005 6:01:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BLY:
Why so little?



Being a military weapon it needed to be serviceable in the field with as little work and time as possible.

Try this little experiment, lube the sheite out of everything like you would a 1911, slide, barrel, trigger bar, connector, firing pin(just put a few drops of oil in the hole next to the stripper rail), locking block, guide/rod & spring, and the extractor. Take it to the range and see if you can put 3-400rds through it without it malfunctioning?

Every Glock rep I've been around will very slightly over lube the gun because they know it will be a year before the gun gets cleaned and lubed again. In other words they use 6 drops of oil instead of 5, mostly on the slide and barrel. Last month I spent all day with the rep at a local store and for once he did not get a Glock in a brown paper bag. It always amazes me how many people say "I have never taken it apart for fear I will screw something up." One guy drives over 200 miles oneway whenever the rep is in town just to have his serviced because he has never had it apart.

One thing you have to remember is most gun owners are not gun people, just owners.
Link Posted: 8/27/2005 12:27:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:
I ended up using oil. I have both (tetra). I'm used to less being more. My USPSA club has a few very dusty bays, so any excess lube becomes mud. Especially in mags. We have guys use graphite powder, some use none, some risk a light shot of spray, it's caused everyone problems one way or another. The only people that shoot glocks that have problems are people that fuck with the internals a lot and do it themselves. I've got the extended releases but that's it. And they were not an option, there were a necessity.



-Never use lubrication in your magazines, ever.

-Never mess with perfection (leave glocks stock)


Link Posted: 8/27/2005 5:35:12 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/28/2005 7:13:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By clubsoda22:

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:
I ended up using oil. I have both (tetra). I'm used to less being more. My USPSA club has a few very dusty bays, so any excess lube becomes mud. Especially in mags. We have guys use graphite powder, some use none, some risk a light shot of spray, it's caused everyone problems one way or another. The only people that shoot glocks that have problems are people that fuck with the internals a lot and do it themselves. I've got the extended releases but that's it. And they were not an option, there were a necessity.



-Never use lubrication in your magazines, ever.

-Never mess with perfection (leave glocks stock)



When you shoot uspsa and you have to shift the gun in your hand to drop a mag or the slide, it's not perfect.
Link Posted: 8/28/2005 9:46:31 AM EDT
You mean were supposed to oil our Glocks?

I just hose it down with a can of Gun Treatment.
Link Posted: 8/28/2005 9:47:03 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/28/2005 9:50:37 AM EDT by cliffy109]

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:
When you shoot uspsa and you have to shift the gun in your hand to drop a mag or the slide, it's not perfect.



You need to grow a longer thumb.

In a more serious answer to the question, I use TW25 grease. One spot on each of the metal rails on the frame, a spot on the connector, one on the barrel hood and occasionally on the locking block. That's it. Never a failure either.
Link Posted: 8/28/2005 11:49:37 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/28/2005 11:51:18 AM EDT by clubsoda22]
You're allowed to modify it if you're playing games with it, not if it's to be used for serious social work. Extended mag release is okay if you have short thumbs. Slide release is a moot point because you should be slingshoting the slide (once again, not if you have to save a milisecond in a game)
Link Posted: 8/28/2005 12:22:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By clubsoda22:
You're allowed to modify it if you're playing games with it, not if it's to be used for serious social work. Extended mag release is okay if you have short thumbs. Slide release is a moot point because you should be slingshoting the slide (once again, not if you have to save a milisecond in a game)

The mods I've done won't do anything but speed my up in ANY situation. I know all about tactical reloading and all that. Either way, it's faster.
Link Posted: 8/28/2005 5:10:55 PM EDT
I live in an area that gets 90+ degrees adn 90+ percent humidity. Oil doesn't last long in a carry gun here, so I use grease. It stays in place
Link Posted: 8/29/2005 8:14:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By HotRod9mm:

Originally Posted By BLY:
Why so little?



Being a military weapon it needed to be serviceable in the field with as little work and time as possible.

Try this little experiment, lube the sheite out of everything like you would a 1911, slide, barrel, trigger bar, connector, firing pin(just put a few drops of oil in the hole next to the stripper rail), locking block, guide/rod & spring, and the extractor. Take it to the range and see if you can put 3-400rds through it without it malfunctioning?

Every Glock rep I've been around will very slightly over lube the gun because they know it will be a year before the gun gets cleaned and lubed again. In other words they use 6 drops of oil instead of 5, mostly on the slide and barrel. Last month I spent all day with the rep at a local store and for once he did not get a Glock in a brown paper bag. It always amazes me how many people say "I have never taken it apart for fear I will screw something up." One guy drives over 200 miles oneway whenever the rep is in town just to have his serviced because he has never had it apart.

One thing you have to remember is most gun owners are not gun people, just owners.



I leave a thin film of oil on the barrel, rails and the inside of the frame (above the bbl).

When I get back from the range, I always say that I'm just going to rub a little oil here and there and be done with it, but I find myself with a completely disassembled weapon (not my GLOCK) and yet I never tire of it... Guess I'm a rare bread

BTW, Someone that will travel 400mi to have someone else disassemble/clean their handgun is out of there mind!
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 6:04:56 AM EDT
Clubsoda I'm curious. Since you know so much about what everyone should and shouldn't do with their guns and exactly how they should and shouldn't be set up tell me something. Which acadamy do you teach at and which magazines do you write for?
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 6:13:48 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/30/2005 6:42:06 AM EDT by metroplex]
I don't quite agree on sling shotting. You can easily ride the slide (even for a fraction of a second) which can slow down the slide as it is going home. If your recoil spring is weak or if your pistol is dirty (fell into sand and grit and you just picked it up to use it or it has been fired w/o cleaning), this can be trouble. You could add a sharp "tap" after dropping the slide. It's also less consistent.

Using a slide release, you can consistently release the slide and let it go home from its own weight and spring power. That extra distance you can compress the spring when sling shotting can be nullified by accidentally slowing down the slide.

As for the extended mag catch, I can see how it can accidentally be pressed in a carry holster. I probably wouldn't use one for a carry pistol (same as the extended slide release) because if you have to reload your carry pistol, then you're in trouble anyhow.

For a zombie/SHTF pistol where frequent reloads are required due to the number of hostile targets, the stock mag catch is almost impossible to use unless you have uber long thumbs or have a slippery enough grip to smartly swivel the pistol to use the short catch. the extended slide release can come in handy.

my grip on my G17 does not come close to accidentally touching the mag catch or the extended slide release (not even close). YMMV though.

I have rifles for SHTF/zombie scenarios with lots of mags and ammo, but why restrict your Glock to last-resort/personal defense duty? With the way I have mine set up, you could use it as a short range offensive weapon
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 6:32:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By clubsoda22:

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:
I ended up using oil. I have both (tetra). I'm used to less being more. My USPSA club has a few very dusty bays, so any excess lube becomes mud. Especially in mags. We have guys use graphite powder, some use none, some risk a light shot of spray, it's caused everyone problems one way or another. The only people that shoot glocks that have problems are people that fuck with the internals a lot and do it themselves. I've got the extended releases but that's it. And they were not an option, there were a necessity.



-Never use lubrication in your magazines, ever.

-Never mess with perfection (leave glocks stock)





+1 on keeping mags lube-free. On my steel mags (non-Glock firearm) I use a light layer of CLP to prevent rusting on the EXTERIOR.

For Glock lubrication, use tiny drops (q-tip swab works great) of lubrication but IMHO you don't really need it. Just keep it clean and protect the metal from rusting.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 6:34:02 AM EDT
I carry in a very stout kydex holster. I've tried leaning on it with all my weight to hit it, Can't come close to hitting the mag release. As far as slingshotting goes, your wrong. If your training correctly you should not run your mag dry, you should perform a mag change in a slight lull in the firing there by keeping one round in and capable of firing in the no more than 1.2 seconds it should take to change mags. If your slower than that train harder. It's not hard to beat one second from mag drop to firing the next round if you practice enough. And you hold onto that light mag just in case. This was the technique taught to me by memebers of the LRPD swat team and reinforced by members of 3 different tac teams including the Arkansas state police. I'll go with them. Every true expert I've talked to all agree that if you sling shot, you've seen one to many delta force movies.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 6:42:49 AM EDT
What you described sounds like a tactical reload, which is something I cannot easily do with the stock setup on my G17 (too short of a mag catch).
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 6:48:32 AM EDT
practice practice practice. Shoot USPSA, IDPA or IPSC if at all possible.
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 5:15:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:
I carry in a very stout kydex holster. I've tried leaning on it with all my weight to hit it, Can't come close to hitting the mag release. As far as slingshotting goes, your wrong. If your training correctly you should not run your mag dry, you should perform a mag change in a slight lull in the firing there by keeping one round in and capable of firing in the no more than 1.2 seconds it should take to change mags. If your slower than that train harder. It's not hard to beat one second from mag drop to firing the next round if you practice enough. And you hold onto that light mag just in case. This was the technique taught to me by memebers of the LRPD swat team and reinforced by members of 3 different tac teams including the Arkansas state police. I'll go with them. Every true expert I've talked to all agree that if you sling shot, you've seen one to many delta force movies.



huh?

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