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Posted: 10/6/2005 9:18:20 AM EDT
I was wondering who makes the most dependable and reliable pistol in 22 it can be an auto or a revolver and has to be light enough to be packed and carried for long distances.  also has to be able to take some abuse if the situation requires it.
thanks
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 9:41:28 AM EDT
I gotta go with my Ruger MKII. It has been all over the place, carried in the glove box, etc., and shoots like a champ.




Link Posted: 10/6/2005 11:25:21 AM EDT

Originally Posted By cheaptrickfan:
I gotta go with my Ruger MKII. It has been all over the place, carried in the glove box, etc., and shoots like a champ.

www.wctrradio.com/images/Img57.jpg

www.wctrradio.com/images/Img54.jpg




+1

My 22/45 has been through hell and still runs like a champ. Once put 2500 rounds through it in one day of dirty bulk pack stuff with no jams.
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 3:56:55 PM EDT
Here's another vote for the Mkii
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 4:13:54 PM EDT
I agree, the Mk II is the best .22 pistol I have ever owned and that has been a few. Volquartsen trigger with pre-travel & over-travel adjustment and Volquartsen hammer, about 2# trigger pull.
Weigand scope mount and Tasco Reddot.

http://home.centurytel.net/s3dcor/MkII.jpg
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 4:24:51 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/6/2005 4:26:56 PM EDT by Colt_SBR]
Get a Ruger MK II and don't look back.  You'll be very happy.  Here's my two.    

 



Link Posted: 10/6/2005 4:33:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BLY:Here's another vote for the Mkii
 yep i also would say teh ruger
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 5:09:02 PM EDT
Browning Buckmark, or Ruger.

Both are built like tanks and can take lots of abuse. I just like the Brownings a little more.
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 5:12:44 PM EDT
What a minute add the Ruger six shot revolvers. I have a standard size revolver and the smaller I believe its called bearcamp? It has two cyclinders one for .22lr and another for .22 magnums.

Both have never malfunctioned. Only some bad primers on the random .22 round.
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 8:43:48 PM EDT
is the ruger mkIII better then 2?

I was told at a gun shop they don't make the II anymore?  I don't know what the difference is
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 9:03:41 PM EDT
A smith and wesson 317 10 shot ultralight revolver is a very reliable durable weapon.
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 9:58:33 PM EDT
THanks for the info. and the fast replie.
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 10:02:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By protozo1:
A smith and wesson 317 10 shot ultralight revolver is a very reliable durable weapon.



That is what I was thinking.

but my ruger 22/45 works pretty well unless it is cold out.  grease from ammo gums up the works pretty bad when it is colder then 40 or so outside.  less than 50 rounds will gum it up.
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 11:13:05 AM EDT

Originally Posted By JaketheSnake:
Browning Buckmark, or Ruger.

Both are built like tanks and can take lots of abuse. I just like the Brownings a little more.



Have to disagree on the Browning. I've got about 10 times as many rounds on my MKII as I do on my Buckmark and my MKII has had no repair issues and minimal wear.  The Browning has had to have the tabs reglued onto the controls which are also getting loose as the holes they ride in the aluminum frame get peened larger.  

The Ruger on the other hand has some erosion of the breach and bolt face because I don't clean it until it starts to jam or accuracy deteriorates.  Usually 1000-1500 rounds.  And the slide stop has peened somewhat after holding the bolt open a minimum of 6000 times.  I've spent better than 3 times the cost of the gun in the ammo I've put through it.

For an auto I don't think the MKII can be beat.  I used to own a Single Six  Which I believe was a very rugged gun but I foolishly traded it in on the Buckmark before I got enough rounds on it to evaluate long term ruggedness.

Kent
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 11:20:05 AM EDT

Originally Posted By yekimak:

Originally Posted By protozo1:
A smith and wesson 317 10 shot ultralight revolver is a very reliable durable weapon.



That is what I was thinking.

but my ruger 22/45 works pretty well unless it is cold out.  grease from ammo gums up the works pretty bad when it is colder then 40 or so outside.  less than 50 rounds will gum it up.



I used to shoot my MKII in MI's Upper Penninsula which has winters that maybe aren't quite as severe as an AK winter but close.  I'd usually X-country ski into a sand pit and shoot.  Never had any jaming issues.  I ran it dry except for the residue Hoppes #9 leaves  behind.

Kent
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 11:37:53 AM EDT
Another +1 for the Ruger MK-II

mine as had 1000's of rds. through it without a problem.

Link Posted: 10/7/2005 12:25:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/7/2005 12:26:56 PM EDT by Bushman_269]
Ruger Single Six

Oops - you said pistol.  In a pistol Ruger Mk II.

Edited for reading comprehension lapse
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 2:16:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Bushman_269:
Ruger Single Six

Oops - you said pistol.  In a pistol Ruger Mk II.

Edited for reading comprehension lapse



You would be right, he said it could be a revolver. I have two old three screw single sixes...Zillions of rounds through them with no problems...
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 2:19:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Green_Canoe:

I used to shoot my MKII in MI's Upper Penninsula which has winters that maybe aren't quite as severe as an AK winter but close.  I'd usually X-country ski into a sand pit and shoot.  Never had any jaming issues.  I ran it dry except for the residue Hoppes #9 leaves  behind.

Kent



I'll have to keep that in mind.  It did not really matter how severe the weather was, just had to be like below 35 degrees or so and it would start acting up.  Bulk ammo tends to be all covered in grease as well, I never tried to see how well it worked in the cold with any decent ammo.

Link Posted: 10/7/2005 2:29:53 PM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 5:18:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ONE-EYE:
I was wondering who makes the most dependable and reliable pistol in 22 it can be an auto or a revolver and has to be light enough to be packed and carried for long distances.  also has to be able to take some abuse if the situation requires it.




Seems like that would drop autos from the running & leave only revolvers, IMO. It would take only a second or two to open a cylinder, wipe it clean & close it back. Try doing that with a semi of any brand.

Among the options for the .22 revolvers, I'd say S&W, Ruger & Taurus. My personal .22 revolver is a S&W Model 63, a J-Frame so it's small, it's stainless steel so it's tough & durable. Seems to be the best of all worlds. The only real downside is they're no longer made & good used ones are exceeding $400 at gun shows. Beat up versions are $350-375, from what I've seen.

Both the Ruger & Taurus are dependable but will be heavier than the S&W 63. There's also the S&W 317 but it's superlight & I don't know how it would hold up should it get dropped onto some rocks?

My .o2
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 6:33:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Colt_SBR:
 



Colt_SBR,

What kind of grips are those?  Where did you get them?  
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 6:44:55 PM EDT
I had a S&W Mod 17, .22lr revolver.  I really liked it but had one problem.  The cylinder was very tight.  After about 50 rounds I had to clean the cylinder with a bore brush or I couldn't get the rounds in.  

Anyone else have this problem?  

Link Posted: 10/8/2005 6:50:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Green_Canoe:

Originally Posted By JaketheSnake:
Browning Buckmark, or Ruger.

Both are built like tanks and can take lots of abuse. I just like the Brownings a little more.



Have to disagree on the Browning. I've got about 10 times as many rounds on my MKII as I do on my Buckmark and my MKII has had no repair issues and minimal wear.  The Browning has had to have the tabs reglued onto the controls which are also getting loose as the holes they ride in the aluminum frame get peened larger.  

The Ruger on the other hand has some erosion of the breach and bolt face because I don't clean it until it starts to jam or accuracy deteriorates.  Usually 1000-1500 rounds.  And the slide stop has peened somewhat after holding the bolt open a minimum of 6000 times.  I've spent better than 3 times the cost of the gun in the ammo I've put through it.

For an auto I don't think the MKII can be beat.  I used to own a Single Six  Which I believe was a very rugged gun but I foolishly traded it in on the Buckmark before I got enough rounds on it to evaluate long term ruggedness.

Kent



Never had one problem with my Browning, I got the browning as they were just coming out.
Yours is the first problem I have ever heard about like that?!?
Besides I have seen Ruger .22s that completely failed to fire and jammed every other round. But were sent back to the factory and Ruger bascially gutted the pistol and replaced as much as possible with out giving a new pistol back. ( thats a big + for ruger)

Did you ever send your buckmark back to browning? I have never had any problems with my tabs or function of the pistol. I have shot every crummy .22 shell I could find through that thing including shot shells.  If your gun was new when you bought it or fairly used browning should have fixed it for you.
Link Posted: 10/8/2005 8:56:47 PM EDT
I also have a Browning Buckmark Plus, and a MarkII. The BMP has been a fantastic pistol, and just seems higher quality than the Ruger...
Link Posted: 10/9/2005 2:08:49 PM EDT
THe Ruger.  I have a MkII that was made in 1976.  It has had thousands and thousands of rounds through it without a problem.

I think the heavy barrel version is nicer, but that is just me.  In answer to the original question, a Ruger .22 pistol.
Link Posted: 10/9/2005 2:21:05 PM EDT
I put 15,000 rounds thru my S&W Model 41, a real sweet shooting pistol that is real accurte.
Link Posted: 10/9/2005 5:39:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/9/2005 5:41:24 PM EDT by Green_Canoe]

Originally Posted By JaketheSnake:

Originally Posted By Green_Canoe:

Originally Posted By JaketheSnake:
Browning Buckmark, or Ruger.

Both are built like tanks and can take lots of abuse. I just like the Brownings a little more.



Have to disagree on the Browning. I've got about 10 times as many rounds on my MKII as I do on my Buckmark and my MKII has had no repair issues and minimal wear.  The Browning has had to have the tabs reglued onto the controls which are also getting loose as the holes they ride in the aluminum frame get peened larger.  

The Ruger on the other hand has some erosion of the breach and bolt face because I don't clean it until it starts to jam or accuracy deteriorates.  Usually 1000-1500 rounds.  And the slide stop has peened somewhat after holding the bolt open a minimum of 6000 times.  I've spent better than 3 times the cost of the gun in the ammo I've put through it.

For an auto I don't think the MKII can be beat.  I used to own a Single Six  Which I believe was a very rugged gun but I foolishly traded it in on the Buckmark before I got enough rounds on it to evaluate long term ruggedness.

Kent



Never had one problem with my Browning, I got the browning as they were just coming out.
Yours is the first problem I have ever heard about like that?!?
Besides I have seen Ruger .22s that completely failed to fire and jammed every other round. But were sent back to the factory and Ruger bascially gutted the pistol and replaced as much as possible with out giving a new pistol back. ( thats a big + for ruger)

Did you ever send your buckmark back to browning? I have never had any problems with my tabs or function of the pistol. I have shot every crummy .22 shell I could find through that thing including shot shells.  If your gun was new when you bought it or fairly used browning should have fixed it for you.



The Browning was brand new when I bought it.  I has about 5000-6000 rounds through it now.  One of my shooting buddys has one with the same issues.   Controls nice and tight, but functional, when we bought it now they are rather floppy in all directions.  We both had loose tabs on the controls.  Mine actually fell off.  A little epoxy fixed both guns no need to sent them back.  The original "C"  clip that holds the recoil spring onto the recoil spring rod is now somewhere under my stove as it flew off a few years ago when I disassembled the gun.  Replacement cost me a $5.00 minimum charge.  The extractor was launched last year by a blown case.  Seems if you just pull the extractor back it just disassembles itself.  It's a decent gun but not one that will be passed on the next generation.

For comparisons sake my Ruger has 60,000+ rounds through it with not a single problem other than some wear that one might expect from a gun that is shot until its so gummed up it fails to function before it is cleaned (1000-1500 rounds).  I'm currently working on my 14th brick of ammo this summer.  If I've cleaned it 10 times I'd be suprised.

I'm not saying the browning is a bad gun.  I just don't think it is the best possible gun for the volume of shooting I do, based on the problems I've had with mine and seen with my buddys (who shoots a similar amount).

Kent
Link Posted: 10/9/2005 9:24:09 PM EDT
"is the ruger mkIII better then 2? "

NO
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