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Posted: 9/23/2010 7:52:02 PM EDT
So i've decided should i keep my Sig 1911 Stainless, she will under go one of those 3 treatments. Now i do know how ionbonding looks on a AR barrel, im looking for pics on guns. Same goes for Armory Kote and Black T.

I'ts just that i have zero experience with those finishes and wanted to have a clue of how would my 1911look before pulling the trigger.

Thanks in advance.

J
Link Posted: 9/23/2010 8:06:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/23/2010 8:07:53 PM EDT by Danno_man]
Armory Kote:


Black-T


IonBond


Matte Armory Kote
Link Posted: 9/23/2010 8:12:11 PM EDT
The IonBond is the best IMHO.
Link Posted: 9/23/2010 8:18:07 PM EDT


Which would you say protects the gun the best against rust?

by the way, what is Black T exactly?

Thanks a lot

J
Link Posted: 9/23/2010 8:46:55 PM EDT
http://black-t.com/index.htm


Didn't know there was a matte Armory Kote, might look into that to get my TRP refinished
Link Posted: 9/23/2010 9:25:15 PM EDT
The thing is i have to refinish this thing no question. Im not liking the SS look, and the battle with rust is getting real old. I need the option that best protects the gun from rust.

J
Link Posted: 9/23/2010 10:57:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/23/2010 10:59:44 PM EDT by youngAR]




Originally Posted By JAVO:

The thing is i have to refinish this thing no question. Im not liking the SS look, and the battle with rust is getting real old. I need the option that best protects the gun from rust.



J


Melonite. Pretty hard and protects against rust.
Link Posted: 9/24/2010 4:28:48 AM EDT
Originally Posted By youngAR:

Originally Posted By JAVO:
The thing is i have to refinish this thing no question. Im not liking the SS look, and the battle with rust is getting real old. I need the option that best protects the gun from rust.

J

Melonite. Pretty hard and protects against rust.


Or IonBond. These are the only 2 that will REALLY help.

The others are just fancy spray on coatings.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 9/24/2010 4:39:51 AM EDT
I like Melonite. Over a year later and NO wear I can see.



< (click on pic for larger view)






Link Posted: 9/24/2010 5:21:35 AM EDT


Armory Kote wears very easily.
Link Posted: 9/24/2010 7:37:07 AM EDT
Originally Posted By divkat9:


Armory Kote wears very easily.


It's obvious from the photo that the Black T does too.

Link Posted: 9/24/2010 8:47:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/27/2010 10:10:34 AM EDT by Spook410]
Ceramic coatings are cheaper.  It's fine if the gun isn't going to see really hard use.  People have successfully run blued guns over the years without a good coating.  Ceramics are certainly tougher and more resistant to elements than bluing but gun may need to be refinished from time to time.

Melonite (Coal Creek Isonite is Melonite and runs about $200) is good for most of the gun.  Because of the heat involved you may have to do something different with the small parts.  Melonite is what is on Glocks.  Pretty tough stuff.

IonBond DLC (DLC is the treatment coating, IonBond is the company) runs about $300.  Go through your gunsmith of Springer Precision.  DLC can do small parts.  Pretty resistant to rust.  There are details on rust resistance I'm fuzzy on so I won't propagate misinformation.  Something about surface treatment holding oil like park'ing does. It looks very nice and holds up well.

You did not mention Robar NP3.  For sheer resistance to the elements, it's worth looking at.
Link Posted: 9/24/2010 12:46:15 PM EDT
According to the IonBond rep at the Greensboro, NC facility (where all guns IonBond treats are supposed to be done), Melonite is more resistant to corrosion than IonBond.  Which is not to say IonBond is bad, just that Melonite is slightly better.

However, Melonite is applied at very high temperatures, and not all parts can be coated.  IonBond is applied at lower temps, and can be applied to every single part in the gun, except springs if I recall correctly.
Link Posted: 9/24/2010 1:13:54 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Spook410:
Ceramic coatings are cheaper.  It's fine if the gun isn't going to see really hard use.  People have successfully run blued guns over the years without a good coating.  Ceramics are certainly tougher and more resistant to elements than bluing but gun may need to be refinished from time to time.

Melonite (Coal Creek Isonite is Melonite and runs about $200) is good for most of the gun.  Because of the heat involved you may have to do something different with the small parts.  Melonite is what is on Glocks.  Pretty tough stuff.

IonBond DLC (DLC is the treatment, IonBond is the company) runs about $300.  Go through your gunsmith of Springer Precision.  DLC can do small parts.  Pretty resistant to rust.  There are details on rust resistance I'm fuzzy on so I won't propagate misinformation.  Something about surface treatment holding oil like park'ing does. It looks very nice and holds up well.

You did not mention Robar NP3.  For sheer resistance to the elements, it's worth looking at.


The post count is certainly appropriate for this thread
Link Posted: 9/24/2010 1:20:01 PM EDT
Originally Posted By SERT103:
Originally Posted By Spook410:
Ceramic coatings are cheaper.  It's fine if the gun isn't going to see really hard use.  People have successfully run blued guns over the years without a good coating.  Ceramics are certainly tougher and more resistant to elements than bluing but gun may need to be refinished from time to time.

Melonite (Coal Creek Isonite is Melonite and runs about $200) is good for most of the gun.  Because of the heat involved you may have to do something different with the small parts.  Melonite is what is on Glocks.  Pretty tough stuff.

IonBond DLC (DLC is the treatment, IonBond is the company) runs about $300.  Go through your gunsmith of Springer Precision.  DLC can do small parts.  Pretty resistant to rust.  There are details on rust resistance I'm fuzzy on so I won't propagate misinformation.  Something about surface treatment holding oil like park'ing does. It looks very nice and holds up well.

You did not mention Robar NP3.  For sheer resistance to the elements, it's worth looking at.


The post count is certainly appropriate for this thread


Never woulda noticed.. post 1911.  Thanks SERT.
Link Posted: 9/24/2010 7:22:35 PM EDT
Here's IonBond new.  After 2500 rds and lots of carry/practice and a couple courses in the desert, you can see some wear under the ambi safety; otherwise it looks the same now, two years later.  Ron Phillips built on Remsport frame.
Link Posted: 9/24/2010 8:55:54 PM EDT
Lots of good information so far.

Melonite is supposed to have better resistance to salt than just about any other finish.  The rockwell hardness of the finish is around 64.  The finish is a bit cheaper than IONBond, and because of the high heat you are not supposed to treat smaller parts or aluminum frame pistols.

IONBond is supposed to have a higher rockwell hardness rating of 70 which is about the same as hard chrome.  Since it is applied at a low temperature you can treat all the parts in the pistol.  

Black T and Armory Kote are bake on finishes.  Both wear pretty easily so if you are deciding between the two I would recommend either saving your money and getting the Armory Kote or going all the way and having the gun Melonited or IONBonded.
Link Posted: 9/24/2010 10:28:33 PM EDT
Black-T will wear and flake.  I have a rifle that was done about 18 years ago and there are some spots that will rust now.  I've also heard that since Mr. Walter Birdsong has died and his children have taken over that the impeccable level of service and timelyness of project completion has fallen by the wayside as well.  For anyone that dealt with Walter knows that is a crying shame.  YMMV.

Melonite is not  a coating.  It is a surface treatment that actually penetrates the metal and changes the molecular properties of it.
Link Posted: 9/25/2010 12:12:06 AM EDT
I dont know if anybody has mentioned this yet, but the Sig Sauer Nitron that is used on the Stainless slide of the P series pistols, is actually Ionbond DLC. If you get Ionbond on the Sig 1911, you are getting the factory Finish on your pistol.
Link Posted: 9/25/2010 7:20:41 AM EDT
Originally Posted By divkat9:


Armory Kote wears very easily.


I have seen this said on here and other places as well, however I sent my stainless Springfield off to Springfields custom shop and had it ArmoryKoted over a year ago. My gun's been carried and holstered and knocked around daily..still looks brand new...really.
Link Posted: 9/25/2010 8:13:30 AM EDT
Originally Posted By woofum:
Originally Posted By divkat9:


Armory Kote wears very easily.


I have seen this said on here and other places as well, however I sent my stainless Springfield off to Springfields custom shop and had it ArmoryKoted over a year ago. My gun's been carried and holstered and knocked around daily..still looks brand new...really.


Mine too.  But not all finishes are equal and any bake-on finish can be botched up.
Link Posted: 9/25/2010 8:29:14 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/25/2010 7:00:10 PM EDT
Originally Posted By woofum:
Originally Posted By divkat9:


Armory Kote wears very easily.


I have seen this said on here and other places as well, however I sent my stainless Springfield off to Springfields custom shop and had it ArmoryKoted over a year ago. My gun's been carried and holstered and knocked around daily..still looks brand new...really.


Mine was armory koted by Springfield's custom shop as well. It started off with a parked finish before I sent it back to them, so that may be a factor? It's been a few years, also carried/holstered daily in a Milt Sparks Watch Six. It began to wear shortly after it came back from the custom shop.

Granted- it doesn't look bad but there are definite noticeable wear spots. If I were to do it all over I would likely go with a different finish.
Link Posted: 9/25/2010 11:24:47 PM EDT
I have a few firearms Teflon coated by Black Ice Coatings.  They're work is great.

If you want the most awesome protection you can find, IonBond it, then send it to Black Ice, then you won't have lube it either.
Link Posted: 9/26/2010 7:13:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/26/2010 7:19:38 AM EDT by army_eod]
I did Melonite from Coal Creek Armory...over my stainless Colt Gold Cup Trophy







Link Posted: 9/26/2010 10:29:41 AM EDT
Originally Posted By C_Rion:
I dont know if anybody has mentioned this yet, but the Sig Sauer Nitron that is used on the Stainless slide of the P series pistols, is actually Ionbond DLC. If you get Ionbond on the Sig 1911, you are getting the factory Finish on your pistol.


These finishes aren't even close to comparable.....
Link Posted: 9/26/2010 10:41:42 AM EDT
Originally Posted By SERT103:
Originally Posted By C_Rion:
I dont know if anybody has mentioned this yet, but the Sig Sauer Nitron that is used on the Stainless slide of the P series pistols, is actually Ionbond DLC. If you get Ionbond on the Sig 1911, you are getting the factory Finish on your pistol.


These finishes aren't even close to comparable.....


True, you don't compare identical finishes.....Nitron IS Ionbond according to Ionbond.
Link Posted: 9/26/2010 10:42:13 AM EDT
Originally Posted By SERT103:
Originally Posted By C_Rion:
I dont know if anybody has mentioned this yet, but the Sig Sauer Nitron that is used on the Stainless slide of the P series pistols, is actually Ionbond DLC. If you get Ionbond on the Sig 1911, you are getting the factory Finish on your pistol.


These finishes aren't even close to comparable.....


True, you don't compare identical finishes.....Nitron IS Ionbond according to Ionbond.
Link Posted: 9/26/2010 11:23:52 AM EDT




Originally Posted By SGB:





Not 100% correct ............ while Black T is a comparatively soft coating even when worn through its application process leaves a degree of corrosion protection,




I've heard the same thing, but the residual left on after it's visibly worn off is going to be far more susceptible to corrosion than Melonite or IonBond DLC with the same round counts. I'm not saying it's crap, but, IMO, it doesn't appear to be on the same level as the other metal treatments.



Just my take on them
Link Posted: 9/26/2010 7:07:26 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Spook410:
Ceramic coatings are cheaper.  It's fine if the gun isn't going to see really hard use.  People have successfully run blued guns over the years without a good coating.  Ceramics are certainly tougher and more resistant to elements than bluing but gun may need to be refinished from time to time.

Melonite (Coal Creek Isonite is Melonite and runs about $200) is good for most of the gun.  Because of the heat involved you may have to do something different with the small parts.  Melonite is what is on Glocks.  Pretty tough stuff.

IonBond DLC (DLC is the treatment, IonBond is the company) runs about $300.  Go through your gunsmith of Springer Precision.  DLC can do small parts.  Pretty resistant to rust.  There are details on rust resistance I'm fuzzy on so I won't propagate misinformation.  Something about surface treatment holding oil like park'ing does. It looks very nice and holds up well.

You did not mention Robar NP3.  For sheer resistance to the elements, it's worth looking at.
wait.. what? Glocks have Melonite finish? does Melonite=Tenifer? if it does then color me... well surprised I guess...

Link Posted: 9/26/2010 7:09:39 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ma1775:
wait.. what? Glocks have Melonite finish? does Melonite=Tenifer? if it does then color me... well surprised I guess...



Then color away...tenifer = melonite.
Link Posted: 9/27/2010 9:53:01 AM EDT


that's my CBOB and it is finished in MELONITE not IonBond. I did a write up on here some time ago, how after more than 10,000 rounds and 3 years of everyday carry there was no wear.

AFAIK, Sig's Nitron is Salt Nitrocarburized = closer to tennifer/melonite, not IonBond which is a PVD coating.

Cerakote, Kimpro, Armor Tuff etc are all fairly feeble. On carry weapons, they wear  fairly fast and they look like shit when they do wear, so you end up having to do it all over again.

Ionbond is a coating, albeit a very fine and extremely hard one. It is very resistant to abrasive actions, such as holstering and drawing, and chemical reactions such as oxidation. But it does wear and it's surprisingly easy to scratch and ding.  

Melonite/Tennifer /Isonite/Hard Hat/e-treat  all actually harden the top few thousandths of the steel, making it extremely hard to scratch. It is much harder wearing than any other finish. At about $200 a pistol, it's also about $100 to $150 cheaper than IonBond. It can only be used on steel, not aluminium or other alloys and the high temperatures used may make it unsuitable for small parts, (hammers, firing pin stops that are usually color matched in black oxide).

Having pistols finished in Cerakote, Black T, Amor Tuff, Kimpro, IonBond and Melonite, I would do Melonite every time.


Link Posted: 9/27/2010 10:10:51 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/27/2010 10:14:24 AM EDT by Buliwyf]
Originally Posted By asiparks:


that's my CBOB and it is finished in MELONITE not IonBond. I did a write up on here some time ago, how after more than 10,000 rounds and 3 years of everyday carry there was no wear.

AFAIK, Sig's Nitron is Salt Nitrocarburized = closer to tennifer/melonite, not IonBond which is a PVD coating.

Cerakote, Kimpro, Armor Tuff etc are all fairly feeble. On carry weapons, they wear  fairly fast and they look like shit when they do wear, so you end up having to do it all over again.

Ionbond is a coating, albeit a very fine and extremely hard one. It is very resistant to abrasive actions, such as holstering and drawing, and chemical reactions such as oxidation. But it does wear and it's surprisingly easy to scratch and ding.  

Melonite/Tennifer /Isonite/Hard Hat/e-treat  all actually harden the top few thousandths of the steel, making it extremely hard to scratch. It is much harder wearing than any other finish. At about $200 a pistol, it's also about $100 to $150 cheaper than IonBond. It can only be used on steel, not aluminium or other alloys and the high temperatures used may make it unsuitable for small parts, (hammers, firing pin stops that are usually color matched in black oxide).

Having pistols finished in Cerakote, Black T, Amor Tuff, Kimpro, IonBond and Melonite, I would do Melonite every time.





Did you Melonite your small parts as well?  







Link Posted: 9/27/2010 10:12:28 AM EDT
Originally Posted By txgp17:
The IonBond is the best IMHO.


This

Link Posted: 9/27/2010 10:23:06 AM EDT
The hammer and firing pin stop are black oxide. The bushing, slide stop etc are melonited.
Link Posted: 9/27/2010 11:06:24 AM EDT
Originally Posted By asiparks:
http://homepage.mac.com/asiparks/.Pictures/45%27s/IMG_0874.jpg

that's my CBOB and it is finished in MELONITE not IonBond. I did a write up on here some time ago, how after more than 10,000 rounds and 3 years of everyday carry there was no wear.

AFAIK, Sig's Nitron is Salt Nitrocarburized = closer to tennifer/melonite, not IonBond which is a PVD coating.

Cerakote, Kimpro, Armor Tuff etc are all fairly feeble. On carry weapons, they wear  fairly fast and they look like shit when they do wear, so you end up having to do it all over again.

Ionbond is a coating, albeit a very fine and extremely hard one. It is very resistant to abrasive actions, such as holstering and drawing, and chemical reactions such as oxidation. But it does wear and it's surprisingly easy to scratch and ding.  

Melonite/Tennifer /Isonite/Hard Hat/e-treat  all actually harden the top few thousandths of the steel, making it extremely hard to scratch. It is much harder wearing than any other finish. At about $200 a pistol, it's also about $100 to $150 cheaper than IonBond. It can only be used on steel, not aluminium or other alloys and the high temperatures used may make it unsuitable for small parts, (hammers, firing pin stops that are usually color matched in black oxide).

Having pistols finished in Cerakote, Black T, Amor Tuff, Kimpro, IonBond and Melonite, I would do Melonite every time.




- Fixed my earlier post. It's IonBond Diamond Like Coating.  Not a treatment.  Also I think they may call it simply IonBond DiamondBlack now.

- I've been thinking about a VBOB (SS ones are getting cheaper) with Melonite.  How durable have you found the black oxide coating on the small parts?  Is an after finish used?  Wouldn't the small parts wear up against the hard Melonite surfaces?  Seems like you would be running a soft surface up against a very hard one.  Like the idea of the hardened surface.

- IonBond is used on a lot of things including machine tools.  What you put it on and how you use it matters.  The coating itself is very hard but it's like 4 microns thick.  You get abrasion resistance because you're up against the coating.  However, when you're talking a scratch or ding with enough force to make it through the coating, what happens depends on the metal underneath.  Unlike Melonite which hardens the surface, once you're through the coating, the properties of the metal are what matters.  I don't encounter that scenario much and my IonBond coated BHP is holding up very well to normal use.

 

Link Posted: 9/27/2010 11:54:34 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Spook410:
Originally Posted By asiparks:
http://homepage.mac.com/asiparks/.Pictures/45%27s/IMG_0874.jpg

that's my CBOB and it is finished in MELONITE not IonBond. I did a write up on here some time ago, how after more than 10,000 rounds and 3 years of everyday carry there was no wear.

AFAIK, Sig's Nitron is Salt Nitrocarburized = closer to tennifer/melonite, not IonBond which is a PVD coating.

Cerakote, Kimpro, Armor Tuff etc are all fairly feeble. On carry weapons, they wear  fairly fast and they look like shit when they do wear, so you end up having to do it all over again.

Ionbond is a coating, albeit a very fine and extremely hard one. It is very resistant to abrasive actions, such as holstering and drawing, and chemical reactions such as oxidation. But it does wear and it's surprisingly easy to scratch and ding.  

Melonite/Tennifer /Isonite/Hard Hat/e-treat  all actually harden the top few thousandths of the steel, making it extremely hard to scratch. It is much harder wearing than any other finish. At about $200 a pistol, it's also about $100 to $150 cheaper than IonBond. It can only be used on steel, not aluminium or other alloys and the high temperatures used may make it unsuitable for small parts, (hammers, firing pin stops that are usually color matched in black oxide).

Having pistols finished in Cerakote, Black T, Amor Tuff, Kimpro, IonBond and Melonite, I would do Melonite every time.




- Fixed my earlier post. It's IonBond Diamond Like Coating.  Not a treatment.  Also I think they may call it simply IonBond DiamondBlack now.

- I've been thinking about a VBOB (SS ones are getting cheaper) with Melonite.  How durable have you found the black oxide coating on the small parts?  Is an after finish used?  Wouldn't the small parts wear up against the hard Melonite surfaces?  Seems like you would be running a soft surface up against a very hard one.  Like the idea of the hardened surface.

- IonBond is used on a lot of things including machine tools.  What you put it on and how you use it matters.  The coating itself is very hard but it's like 4 microns thick.  You get abrasion resistance because you're up against the coating.  However, when you're talking a scratch or ding with enough force to make it through the coating, what happens depends on the metal underneath.  Unlike Melonite which hardens the surface, once you're through the coating, the properties of the metal are what matters.  I don't encounter that scenario much and my IonBond coated BHP is holding up very well to normal use.



I really like your BHP, if ever I get around to sending mine out i hope it'll look a bit like that....
My nighthawk is finished in Diamond black, it's stood up to holstering and suchlike very well, but I originally had thought it was closer in attributes, to melonite.
I'd tried to wear my CBOB as much as possible through carrying, shooting, chucking it in my rangebag with tools and mags and it came through completely unscathed other than the grips (d'oh !)...Completely through my own ignorance, I thought I could do that with the DLC'd Nighthawk, but quickly found out that it is quite easy to "ding" and scratch.
Again, this all reflect just my own experiences.....

As far as wear, the frame and slide are both melonited so rail wear isn't a concern. The barrel is left in the white, so it is feasable that after many , many rounds, the lugs could get worn with repeated lock up into the slide. I am keeping an eye on the disconnector, It is also in the white and it has shown to be marking the underside of the firing pin channel on the slide. I'm leaving the marking there, thinking that the disconnector is now, in effect, rubbing against itself. That should reduce or eliminate wear.
I'm not sure that this is any different though from having an "in the white" disconnector rubbing on an IonBonded slide and frame. I guess that polish and surface prep would make a bigger difference than finish, smoother equalling less wear.
The hammer and FPS are the only black oxide small parts. The sides of the hammer could wear against the frame, but assuming my hammer is correctly fitted, interference would be minimal. (They're not melonited as I was advised that the very high temperatures involved could possible embrittle small parts to the extent that those which directly impact each other could break.  I would advise contacting Coal Creek Armory directly to find out if this is still the case.)

If it does all fuck up horrendously, I will happily post my sorrowful tale here....
Link Posted: 9/27/2010 1:42:45 PM EDT


asiparks, from what I've read and been told, the friction coefficient of even one part (i.e. your disconnector vs. the slide) being melonited is much better than plain steel on steel. I want to post the numbers I remember, but I'm not 100% sure they're accurate.



Just saying that even with the harder parts rubbing against softer parts, there's less friction involved, so less wear should be present.


Link Posted: 9/27/2010 2:41:58 PM EDT
Originally Posted By WIZZO_ARAKM14:
asiparks, from what I've read and been told, the friction coefficient of even one part (i.e. your disconnector vs. the slide) being melonited is much better than plain steel on steel. I want to post the numbers I remember, but I'm not 100% sure they're accurate.

Just saying that even with the harder parts rubbing against softer parts, there's less friction involved, so less wear should be present.




Yep.  Spike's Tactical had a thread about it, they talked about their melonite barrels and their chrome BCG's and their NiB BCG's.  They said that even having just one half of the moving/touching parts finished in the miracle finishes was better than nothing at all.
Link Posted: 9/30/2010 3:47:58 AM EDT
Well, melonite i think is the clear option for me. Now any suggestion as of where to get the job done? Just checked the Springfield Armory Custom shop page and they don't offer it.

Your thoughts?

Thanks
Link Posted: 9/30/2010 4:14:24 AM EDT
Coal Creek Armory


Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 9/30/2010 12:15:56 PM EDT
^^ this^^
Link Posted: 9/30/2010 9:19:46 PM EDT
Originally Posted By SERT103:
Originally Posted By C_Rion:
I dont know if anybody has mentioned this yet, but the Sig Sauer Nitron that is used on the Stainless slide of the P series pistols, is actually Ionbond DLC. If you get Ionbond on the Sig 1911, you are getting the factory Finish on your pistol.


These finishes aren't even close to comparable.....



You know little of which you speak. Here , I will say it again so you can read it twice:

NITRON IS IONBOND!!!!!



Link Posted: 9/30/2010 11:35:35 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/30/2010 11:38:17 PM EDT by Redemption_IBIG]
Which is better, Ionbond or NP3? Sorry if this is considered a thread hijack, but I didn't feel it required a new thread on its own. It may even help the original poster.

Also, is Springfield Armory's Nickel Teflon practically NP3?

Thank you for any help given, take care! This thread is helping a lot.
Link Posted: 10/1/2010 12:43:52 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Redemption_IBIG:
Which is better, Ionbond or NP3? Sorry if this is considered a thread hijack, but I didn't feel it required a new thread on its own. It may even help the original poster.

Also, is Springfield Armory's Nickel Teflon practically NP3?

Thank you for any help given, take care! This thread is helping a lot.


I'm leaning towards the melonite surface treatment, but im  interested too on reading the opinions on the Robar NP3.

Question: Is the Isonite QPQ the melonite treatment right?  It's just that everybody calls it melonite and on the coal creek armory site is named differently. Im just covering my bases.

Thanks for all the help.

J
Link Posted: 10/1/2010 3:28:04 AM EDT
Yes, the Isonite is melonite. Something about trademarks or rights to the "Melonite" name lead them to create their own name for it.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 10/1/2010 12:23:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/1/2010 12:33:43 PM EDT by stealbear]
Ion bond is real tough. My only complaint is it seems to change color when wet or dry more than other finishes.  This plus Micarta grips makes for the most color changing gun ive ever had.
Wet/black

Dry/gray

Really dry.






 
 
 
 
 

 

 
Link Posted: 10/1/2010 2:11:07 PM EDT
Originally Posted By stealbear:
Ion bond is real tough. My only complaint is it seems to change color when wet or dry more than other finishes.  This plus Micarta grips makes for the most color changing gun ive ever had.



Wet/black

http://img571.imageshack.us/img571/9240/019ps.jpg




Dry/gray

http://img818.imageshack.us/img818/9669/001ppsd.jpg





Really dry.



http://img820.imageshack.us/img820/5562/022fg.jpg
             


That is one sick heater you got there stealbear
Link Posted: 10/2/2010 4:46:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/2/2010 4:48:54 PM EDT by jake-cutter]
Will Springfiled still warranty a gun if it is refinished by Coal Creek Armory in Melonite? I also want to finish/blacken my stainless TRP.
Link Posted: 10/3/2010 11:37:32 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Redemption_IBIG:
Which is better, Ionbond or NP3? Sorry if this is considered a thread hijack, but I didn't feel it required a new thread on its own. It may even help the original poster.

Also, is Springfield Armory's Nickel Teflon practically NP3?

Thank you for any help given, take care! This thread is helping a lot.


IonBond is Black, NP3 is dark silverish.

I have an NP3 hi power, there is some wear on the high spots but it's honestly very difficult to see. NP3 is very slick to touch, think non stick frying pan. IonBond feels "dry"



Link Posted: 10/4/2010 10:05:58 AM EDT
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