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9/16/2019 10:09:13 PM
Posted: 1/3/2012 5:44:17 AM EDT
Say 40 or 50 years +?
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 5:50:31 AM EDT
Glocks(and others) have been around for a while now. Haven't heard of any that just turn to dust in your hands.
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 5:53:37 AM EDT
Probably better than me.
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 7:00:48 AM EDT
My Glock 23 was made back in the 90's (98 I think). Still going strong !
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 7:12:24 AM EDT
HK VP 70 has been around 40 years and Glocks came out in the early 1980's which makes them 30 years.
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 7:34:19 AM EDT
When did the Nylon 66 come out. It seems to be doing fine. Also the plastic used on the MP 38 over 70 years ago is holding out too. I think the modern pistols will be fine, or at least as good as when they were made (I prefer steel).
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 7:48:33 AM EDT
Glock 23 bought in 1992 still going strong.
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 7:57:01 AM EDT
The biggest killer for any kind of polymer/plastic is UV light.
Given that most tactical tupperware isnt going to be sitting in the sun all day for the next 50 years like say....plastic car parts- im not really that worried about it.
Maybe if you shoot several thousand rounds a month for a few decades you might start wearing out and breaking plastic parts.
For the average person I dont see them aging any worse then an all metal gun.
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 8:03:35 AM EDT
Consider the Remington Nylon 66.

You can still find ancient ones that work fine.

Usually the metal parts look a lot worse than the plastic parts.

The Nylon 66 was introduced in 1959, incidentally.
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 1:49:16 PM EDT
Originally Posted By TUBBY:
HK VP 70 has been around 40 years and Glocks came out in the early 1980's which makes them 30 years.


HK's designed the first polymer pistol. Still going strong
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 11:00:42 PM EDT
I have a Tec 9 that was made in the early 80s and it's still going strong, I see no reason why ploymer would be any different as long they are maintained. Don't leave it out laying on your dash of your car for 50 years and you will be fine. Just like you wouldn't bury a 1911 in the ground and leave it, or cover in salt water.
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 11:30:58 PM EDT
G22 bought in 94 still excellent.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 4:16:31 AM EDT
5,000 years from now archeologists will be digging up Glock frames from the former American Republic and putting them in museums.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 8:15:14 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/4/2012 8:17:53 AM EDT by twoofswords]
Look up pistol-training.com's torture tests. Their time span is only measured in the weeks but they have a Gen 4 Glock 17 going on 40 weeks.

Gen 4 Glock 17
http://pistol-training.com/archives/6049

HK45
http://pistol-training.com/archives/4027

M&P 9
http://pistol-training.com/archives/998

HK P30
http://pistol-training.com/archives/2668

Pretty impressive...

Edit: Also, I wish I had the budget to shoot all those guns and all that ammo... =P
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 9:10:02 AM EDT
The original Gen-I Glocks made in the '80s are still going strong.






[assuming no one has pulled the pin on 'em yet ]
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 9:42:57 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Cheesebeast:
Consider the Remington Nylon 66.

You can still find ancient ones that work fine.

Usually the metal parts look a lot worse than the plastic parts.

The Nylon 66 was introduced in 1959, incidentally.


I have a 1964 Nylon 66AB that was handed down to me from my father. It is in excellent condition even though it has been shot plenty over the years. The plastic looks as good as new. Considering the polymers used on modern pistols (M&P, Glock, HK, XD pistols, etc.) are better engineered and designed for rough use, you'd be hard pressed to find it breaking down in yours or your kid's lifetime. You will wear out springs and barrels before you would wear out the polymer, so long as you don't run it over with a truck or something.

Link Posted: 1/4/2012 11:25:10 AM EDT
The frame on my 1989 G19 looks and feels almost brand new still.

Link Posted: 1/4/2012 11:35:15 AM EDT
let's put it this way.

a regular ole plastic bottle can out last our lifetime in the landfills.

a high tech polymer designed to be durable is used in polymer frame guns.

i would imagine they would hold up for at least a longggg time while enduring regular use.

but my friend does have a gen 1 glock 17 he used for LE and private work and it still works flawlessly like my gen 3 glock 17.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 12:28:41 PM EDT
Originally Posted By GLOCKREAPER:
5,000 years from now archeologists will be digging up Glock frames from the former American Republic and putting them in museums.


We've held a few pistol and carbine classes on a friend's land. I imagine archaeologists digging it up thousands of years from now, speculating about the great battle that must have occurred on that spot.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 12:31:51 PM EDT
Originally Posted By tommytrauma:
Originally Posted By GLOCKREAPER:
5,000 years from now archeologists will be digging up Glock frames from the former American Republic and putting them in museums.


We've held a few pistol and carbine classes on a friend's land. I imagine archaeologists digging it up thousands of years from now, speculating about the great battle that must have occurred on that spot.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


Yea, but the site analysis shows a lot of soldiers were all firing in the same general direction....and no one was shooting back!

IT WAS A MASSACRE!

Another horrible example of the brutality of the 21st Century Hominid.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 2:10:04 PM EDT
My Glock 19 dates to 1995 and it is still chugging along like it was new.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 2:14:45 PM EDT
Better than steel.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 4:04:59 PM EDT
Originally Posted By GLOCKREAPER:
5,000 years from now archeologists will be digging up Glock frames from the former American Republic and putting them in museums.


Arfcom backyard stash guns?
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 4:47:43 PM EDT
Originally Posted By HoodyHoo21:
Better than steel.


Yep.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 5:01:49 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/4/2012 5:06:33 PM EDT by ED_P]
I wonder about some of the softer synthetic compounds used in things like AR buffers.

Some plastics do react strangely over time. I've had old plastic items that lost their flexibility and became brittle and easy to break, but they were cheap consumer items and not nylon impregnated fiberglass.

In Glocks, I'd worry more about things like the spring loaded bearing or the firing pin channel liner becoming brittle after decades. I'm guessing they're not made out of the same material as the frame.

HK handguns have a tiny rubber plug in the extractor on all their guns that would concern me more than the frame after a few decades.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 5:22:02 PM EDT
Quite literally, if you set a Glock out in your backyard and left it, the springs, frame rails, etc would be gone long before the frame.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 5:39:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/4/2012 5:39:42 PM EDT by smoketheresfire]
Originally Posted By ED_P:
In Glocks, I'd worry more about things like the spring loaded bearing or the firing pin channel liner becoming brittle after decades. I'm guessing they're not made out of the same material as the frame.



The bolt carrier in my Nylon 66 looks like the day I brought it home (when I was 8), and it is that same shiny, smooth plastic stuff. I'm not too worried about the firing pin chanel liner. That part sees exactly zero uv light.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 6:26:13 PM EDT
My Nylon 66 is a bit newer than yours, made in '68. But, still looks pretty darn good considering how many rounds my dad put through it, and I've put through it. I expend modern polymers to do even better.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 8:04:29 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/6/2012 8:07:48 AM EDT by ED_P]
I am hopeful more modern materials have been engineered to survive, but I am wary in particular of softer compounds. Here's an example of modern (2000 production) material failing in a gun due to age.

http://berettaforum.net/vb/showthread.php?t=81630

As long as you keep metal oiled, an all metal gun does have its merits for handing down to great grandkids.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 11:33:07 PM EDT
The single toughest firearm, the indisputable king of durability, the ONE handgun that can tolerate more abuse, misuse, outright vandalism, and still compete in combat matches, without malfunction is, without question the
Glock 21.
There is not a tougher machine of any description, for any purpose, in any category made by man.
There is no more durable arm than a G21.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 2:52:54 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Fullpower:
The single toughest firearm, the indisputable king of durability, the ONE handgun that can tolerate more abuse, misuse, outright vandalism, and still compete in combat matches, without malfunction is, without question the
Glock 21.
There is not a tougher machine of any description, for any purpose, in any category made by man.
There is no more durable arm than a G21.


As apposed to a 9mm or .40 cal glock. I'm not really following you.
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