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Posted: 7/19/2013 6:35:01 PM EDT
So, I just got four new revolvers (2 Ruger Blackhawks and 2 S&W 686s).  After shooting, I googled how to clean a revolver and several people (including Larry Potterfield from Midway USA) says to use steel wool to clean the front of the cylinder, but I am very worried that using steel wool on the blued Blackhawk will remove or scratch the bluing.  So, how do you suggest cleaning the front of the cylinder?
Link Posted: 7/19/2013 6:52:20 PM EDT
I hear that brass wool will clean the fouling without removing the bluing.

I just use an old tooth brush with Hoppe's #9.
Link Posted: 7/19/2013 7:25:27 PM EDT
Soft brass brush with your favorite cleaner. I've also had good luck with a dab or two of Flitz on the end of a Q-tip or patch. I know some people use a pencil eraser.

In the past I used to obsess about the front of the cylinder being spotless. Not anymore. I try to keep all my stuff clean but spending more time cleaning than shooting takes all the fun out of the hobby.
Link Posted: 7/19/2013 7:40:55 PM EDT
I use the nonabrasive flitz
Link Posted: 7/19/2013 8:15:43 PM EDT
Several companies make lead removal clothes that work great
Link Posted: 7/19/2013 8:23:37 PM EDT
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Several companies make lead removal clothes that work great
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On a blued firearm, those will take the bluing off in very short order. they work great on SS firearms.
Link Posted: 7/19/2013 8:38:28 PM EDT
On SS, I use Mother's Mag Cleaner to remove coon eyes.
Link Posted: 7/20/2013 1:56:58 AM EDT
I use a soft brass brush and CLP. If its a simple cleaning after a light day at the range i use a toothbrush and CLP.

 
Link Posted: 7/20/2013 4:19:25 AM EDT
On the blued ones, just a cleaning with Hoppes either 9 or elite with a tooth brush, not vigorously, just to remove any excess. That's about as much as you can do with them without risking the finish. Do not use any lead removing cloths or abrasives on blued firearms. Some do on older firearms but the blueing process is a bit different now. On stainless, use the flitz if you want. I use Mothers Billet Polish and a soft T-shirt. It's a bit more aggressive then the mag wheel cleaner. I only do them every few years. Normally, I use it to clean the outside of the high gloss ones after the range and a regular cleaning then finish them off with a wax. Don't use steel anything, it could cause rusting.

Some of the stainless revolvers from the last cleaning using Mothers Billet. Again, I only do this every couple years:

Link Posted: 7/20/2013 6:04:29 AM EDT
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Quoted:
On the blued ones, just a cleaning with Hoppes either 9 or elite with a tooth brush, not vigorously, just to remove any excess. That's about as much as you can do with them without risking the finish. Do not use any lead removing cloths or abrasives on blued firearms. Some do on older firearms but the blueing process is a bit different now. On stainless, use the flitz if you want. I use Mothers Billet Polish and a soft T-shirt. It's a bit more aggressive then the mag wheel cleaner. I only do them every few years. Normally, I use it to clean the outside of the high gloss ones after the range and a regular cleaning then finish them off with a wax. Don't use steel anything, it could cause rusting.

Some of the stainless revolvers from the last cleaning using Mothers Billet. Again, I only do this every couple years:

<a href="http://s302.photobucket.com/user/Taipan01/media/combos%20and%2022s/Cylinders_zpsed2c2635.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i302.photobucket.com/albums/nn82/Taipan01/combos%20and%2022s/Cylinders_zpsed2c2635.jpg</a>
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Well, if you only do it every couple years, I probably don't need to do it for a while then.  Thanks for your input.
Link Posted: 7/20/2013 6:45:42 AM EDT
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Quoted:



Well, if you only do it every couple years, I probably don't need to do it for a while then.  Thanks for your input.
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Quoted:
Quoted:
On the blued ones, just a cleaning with Hoppes either 9 or elite with a tooth brush, not vigorously, just to remove any excess. That's about as much as you can do with them without risking the finish. Do not use any lead removing cloths or abrasives on blued firearms. Some do on older firearms but the blueing process is a bit different now. On stainless, use the flitz if you want. I use Mothers Billet Polish and a soft T-shirt. It's a bit more aggressive then the mag wheel cleaner. I only do them every few years. Normally, I use it to clean the outside of the high gloss ones after the range and a regular cleaning then finish them off with a wax. Don't use steel anything, it could cause rusting.

Some of the stainless revolvers from the last cleaning using Mothers Billet. Again, I only do this every couple years:

<a href="http://s302.photobucket.com/user/Taipan01/media/combos%20and%2022s/Cylinders_zpsed2c2635.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i302.photobucket.com/albums/nn82/Taipan01/combos%20and%2022s/Cylinders_zpsed2c2635.jpg</a>



Well, if you only do it every couple years, I probably don't need to do it for a while then.  Thanks for your input.


Truth is you don't need to do it at all beyond the Hoppes and a tooth brush. If the eyes bug you then try it the way I do it, its not bad. Just chill, watch the tube and polish a cylinder face but it's not necessary.

T.
Link Posted: 7/20/2013 6:55:19 AM EDT
CLP, brass brush and fine steel wool. Though I am not anal about it.



(only own SS wheel guns)
Link Posted: 7/20/2013 7:04:55 AM EDT
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CLP, brass brush and fine steel wool. Though I am not anal about it.

(only own SS wheel guns)
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I've both and I won't knock your method if it works for you but those SS's are not the stainless you think they are. They are just not as susceptible to the environments as straight steel but they are not knife stainless. It'd be just to much to work into a gun. I mention all that is it's really just above steel, if you leave some of those steel wool fibers around, you can start rusting it a bit. If you need to scrub, try scotchbrite pads Again, not knocking it and if it works, more power to you, just a heads up.
Link Posted: 7/20/2013 10:03:23 AM EDT
yup,#9 and a toothbrush.

clown
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 10:42:08 AM EDT
I wouldn't use steel wool.
I've always used the plastic scrubbers that are sold in the house cleaning aisle of the super market.  Different makes are "harder" or "softer".  I use the softer ones.  The hard ones can scratch certain types of SS finishes like the satin finish used by S&W on the 625, for example.

One thing I like about the plastic scrubbers is that they can easily be cut with a scissors into 1" x 2" rectangles and stored ready to use with the rest of my gun cleaning shit.

These 1" x 2" plastic scrubbers are also very good for scrubbing the "tail end" of an AR15 bolt.  So, they're in with my AR maintenance kit, too.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 9:32:06 PM EDT
On blued guns, I use Hoppe's and a nylon brush. That takes most of it off, and i'm not concerned about getting it perfect because the dark color hides a lot of it.

On stainless guns, I used Hoppe's with a brass or bronze brush. That take off damn near all of it, and I know it won't hurt the finish.
Link Posted: 7/25/2013 5:43:08 PM EDT
On stainless, I use a Lead Remover" cloth. Fast, and you won't scratch the hell out of em'.
Link Posted: 7/26/2013 10:26:24 AM EDT
Quoted:
So, I just got four new revolvers (2 Ruger Blackhawks and 2 S&W 686s).  After shooting, I googled how to clean a revolver and several people (including Larry Potterfield from Midway USA) says to use steel wool to clean the front of the cylinder, but I am very worried that using steel wool on the blued Blackhawk will remove or scratch the bluing.  So, how do you suggest cleaning the front of the cylinder?
View Quote


I have used a pencil eraser on my 686 and it works great. It sounds crazy but it works.
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