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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/6/2005 2:08:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2005 2:27:02 AM EDT by spork]
I want a personalized 1911 but I want to keep the classic GI look as much as I can.

For a base gun should I start with a SA Mil-Spec? What about the SA GI Mil-Spec? Is it as customizable as the ordinary Mil-Spec? What are the internal differences between the two?

Are there any adjustable GI profile night sights?

Should I keep the original hammer, or are aftermarket hammers too good to pass up?

I intend to keep the safety in the off position (because my finger is my safety), so is an ambi safety necessary?

Anything else I should know?

Feel free to share pics of your classic looking 1911.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 2:14:04 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2005 2:15:10 AM EDT by Lumpy196]

Originally Posted By spork:
I want a personalized 1911 but I want to keep the classic GI look as much as I can.

For a base gun should I start with a SA Mil-Spec? What about the SA GI Mil-Spec? Is it as customizable as the ordinary Mil-Spec?
Both are decent guns. Yes they are equally customizable. The GI version has the correct verticle cocking serrations on the slide, if thats the look you're going for

Are there any adjustable GI profile night sights?
Adjustable sights are bigger. Night sights are bigger. NEITHER, let alone the combination is going to look "G.I." in any way

Should I keep the original hammer, or are aftermarket hammers too good to pass up?
If you want to keep it "G.I" looking, skip it. If you dont plan on adding an extended grip-safety, skp it.

Anything else I should know?
Yes, make up your mind now if you want a G.I. spec gun with a few tweaks for reliability, or if you actually want a custom gun - the two concepts just dont fit together

Link Posted: 9/6/2005 2:15:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2005 2:16:19 AM EDT by spork]
Eek, sorry, Lumpy. I edited my post after you quoted it.

To which question are you saying "yes" to?

ETA: Now you edited your post, nm.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:49:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By spork:

I intend to keep the safety in the off position (because my finger is my safety), so is an ambi safety necessary?






Huh? Do you plan on carrying this gun? If so, condition zero really isn't advised. While I agree that one shouldn't rely on safeties to cover poor handlilng practices, I don't think this is a great idea. Once you get the gun, practice the cadence of drawing and flicking off the safety so it is engrained into your muscle memory.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 9:37:21 AM EDT
I prefer bigger sights, a beaver tail grip safety, a flat mainspring housing, and a ring style hammer on my 1911s. None of those are the GI look. I carry a 1911 as my main carry weapon. Please don't go around with a cocked and UNLOCKED 1911. That is just a bad idea. You can flick off the safety as you bring the gun on target. It doesn't take any additional time at all. Best. Watch-Six
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 7:59:47 PM EDT
I'll agree with Lumpy. G.I. guns are very "basic" looking. A G.I. style is something that refers to a certain sight set, basic non extented release/safety, etc. It's going to be real hard to keep your gun G.I. looking and customise it at the same time. G.I. sights are not what a lot of people want, the second you change them to something better, it's not G.I. looking anymore. Change the grip safety, safety, release or such and it's not G.I. looking anmore. One thing you could do is a trigger job on it. That could be done without having it "show"

Let me help you here in true AR-15 fashion........Get both!
Link Posted: 9/7/2005 8:44:31 PM EDT
Thanks for the info. I will re-evaluate my plans for a 1911.
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 5:34:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By cliffy109:

Originally Posted By spork:

I intend to keep the safety in the off position (because my finger is my safety), so is an ambi safety necessary?






Huh? Do you plan on carrying this gun? If so, condition zero really isn't advised. While I agree that one shouldn't rely on safeties to cover poor handlilng practices, I don't think this is a great idea. Once you get the gun, practice the cadence of drawing and flicking off the safety so it is engrained into your muscle memory.



No kidding. Don't listen to everything you see in movies.
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