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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/8/2005 2:27:24 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/19/2005 7:19:12 PM EDT by chromeluv]
I have traveled with two of my firearms. I left for arizona on july 14th, and I just now got to the range with my wilson and springfield XD.

Anyone experience little malfunctions with tight toleranced 1911s when they are dry? i am sure everyone does, I am just hoping people make me feel better after my range session today :)

the cqb failed to go into battery quite a bit in the beginning, but with some borrowed CLP and more shooting it was fine by the end. It makes sense, almost 4 weeks with no shooting/no oil. I didn't bring any cleaning supplies or even a take down tool with me.

It doesn't really upset me, but maybe it attests to the fact that I only have approximately 1000 rounds in the gun and its stil needs to be broke in even more.

I plan on taking this gun to frontsight in december, so I will have to just put this gun infront of the others when I shoot to ensure I get more rounds down the tube...
Link Posted: 8/8/2005 3:11:02 PM EDT
In my experience, the wetter the better!( Get your mind out of the gutter)


Seriously.

Travis
Link Posted: 8/8/2005 3:14:04 PM EDT
Browning designed the 1911 to be functionally reliable with what we would today call loose
tolerances , but which in his day were normal tolerances for a mass produced gun.
Even so , the originals had some hand fitting done to them.

Lubrication of the bearing surfaces was SOP for military weapons of the time also.

Modern production 1911s are much more precisely machined , but little hand fitting is done.
They are also held to tighter tolerances because people want an "accurate " gun

I venture if you could today make a 1911 out of a material which NEVER exhibited wear ,
and held it to tight specs - the damn thing would barely function at all

Use some clp or gun oil on the rails and sear etc. , and let it wear in for a few 100 rounds.

It will only get better
Link Posted: 8/8/2005 3:30:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AKsRule:
Browning designed the 1911 to be functionally reliable with what we would today call loose
tolerances , but which in his day were normal tolerances for a mass produced gun.
Even so , the originals had some hand fitting done to them.

Lubrication of the bearing surfaces was SOP for military weapons of the time also.

Modern production 1911s are much more precisely machined , but little hand fitting is done.
They are also held to tighter tolerances because people want an "accurate " gun

I venture if you could today make a 1911 out of a material which NEVER exhibited wear ,
and held it to tight specs - the damn thing would barely function at all

Use some clp or gun oil on the rails and sear etc. , and let it wear in for a few 100 rounds.

It will only get better



Appreciate the info.
It was like the cqb was 'lagged', slide was just behind the power curve going into battery :)

But like i said, after some clp and 50 rounds, it was doing fine, just one hiccup after that..
Link Posted: 8/19/2005 7:21:12 PM EDT
Update:

My friend is the gunsmith at one of the gander mountains here, he let me drop it off and dunk it in super duper ultra el33t subsonic solution cleaner machine thingy to give it a real 110% cleaning. He field stripped it and found out that the wilson 'shock-buff' was tore up and that could have been the cause of the slide delay.

I ordered some, anyone ever hear of this in a cqb after approx 1000rounds?
Link Posted: 8/19/2005 7:54:34 PM EDT
I use a Wilson Shok-Buff in my CQB while range shooting. I routinely replace it after 500 rounds. I remember someone posting awhile back that he would get 1000 rounds out of his by reversing it after 500 rounds. I don't use a Shok-Buff in any carry gun because if it comes apart it will jamb up the works.
Link Posted: 8/20/2005 11:48:16 AM EDT
I use Slide Glide medium weight in my Wilson CQB. It works flawlessly every time. I also use a Wilson Shok-Buff. I change it out every 500 rounds. They are really cheap so it doen'st cost much to change them on a regular basis.
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 9:45:50 AM EDT
There is no need for a shok buff in a 1911. It is a tool to be used. When worn out, replace as necessary. A piece of rubber in the spring tunnel is just asking for it.

damian@adcofirearms.com
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 10:07:10 AM EDT

Originally Posted By dubb-1:
There is no need for a shok buff in a 1911. It is a tool to be used. When worn out, replace as necessary. A piece of rubber in the spring tunnel is just asking for it.

damian@adcofirearms.com



+1. They are unnecessary and can cause problems. Just another way for the toy sellers to make money.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 10:23:23 AM EDT
Tight 1911's not working is an urban legend that experience never seems to kill.

Also, you don't get the slide fit for accuracy, you get it fit for the feel. Barrel fit is what provides all the accuracy.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 10:31:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Sparky315:

Originally Posted By dubb-1:
There is no need for a shok buff in a 1911. It is a tool to be used. When worn out, replace as necessary. A piece of rubber in the spring tunnel is just asking for it.

damian@adcofirearms.com



+1. They are unnecessary and can cause problems. Just another way for the toy sellers to make money.



+2 1911's don't really have excessive recoil on average anyways unless you're shooting some really hot loads in a really small 1911.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 10:32:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Combat_Jack:
Tight 1911's not working is an urban legend that experience never seems to kill.

Also, you don't get the slide fit for accuracy, you get it fit for the feel. Barrel fit is what provides all the accuracy.



+1 If I were buying a 1911, I'd want something fairly loose in terms of slide fit but with a good barrel/bushing fit. "Tight" and "properly fitted" aren't always the same thing.
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