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Posted: 3/6/2005 9:03:28 AM EDT
I have a G23, and with the recent influx of police trade and other .40 used pistols hitting the market, I want another. A friend brought up the KB problem, and I want to know how it has affected other Glock owners.

It seems to be a bit of a crusade by just a couple people, and it seems every pistol design/manufactirer suffers occasional KB's. Should I get rid of my G23 or get another???
Link Posted: 3/6/2005 10:29:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/6/2005 11:21:13 AM EDT by Hawkeye]
Link Posted: 3/6/2005 10:35:17 AM EDT
I agree with everything Hawkeye said!
Link Posted: 3/6/2005 7:36:49 PM EDT
I have a G-22 and a 23 , i have shot a lot and i have never had any problems with them ...
Link Posted: 3/7/2005 11:59:47 AM EDT
Look at some fired cases out of your pistol. If you can eaisly see a bulge or swelling of the rear of the fired case then you have a Glock that could have a problem.

No swelling or bulging no worries of a K-boom.
Link Posted: 3/7/2005 1:02:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By LVACGAR:
I have a G23, and with the recent influx of police trade and other .40 used pistols hitting the market, I want another. A friend brought up the KB problem, and I want to know how it has affected other Glock owners.

It seems to be a bit of a crusade by just a couple people, and it seems every pistol design/manufactirer suffers occasional KB's. Should I get rid of my G23 or get another???



I say if you like your 40, keep it! Keep it clean, shoot good factory ammo and you should not have a problem. Any pistol will "blow" if you stuff the wrong cartridge in it.

As far as getting another, get a G19 and you'll have the diversity of the two calibers. That way you wont regret getting rid of the G23, and you wont be stuck with two 40's.
Link Posted: 3/7/2005 3:54:51 PM EDT
The issue is the use of over-charged reloads in the pistols. If a GLOCK, Inc pistol fails due to commercially manufactured ammo, the factory will replace it under the warranty. If the pistol fails due to reloaded ammunition it will be replaced at cost. Also, use only jacketed ammunition as lead ammunition used repeatedly can cause unsafe chamber pressures in rounds that weren't designed with +P specs like the .40 S&W.
Link Posted: 3/7/2005 4:05:34 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/7/2005 4:06:07 PM EDT
Also let me add this: you are going to hear the team nonsupported chamber a lot. The term is completely overused and those that are using it are clueless. Any handgun that uses the modified Browning design automatically has a partially supported chamber. So when you hear them spewing garbage about Glocks having a unsupported chamber you'll know to never listen to a bit of advice they offer again because they are either too lazy or too dumb to do a little research on their own.

Link Posted: 3/7/2005 4:18:59 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/7/2005 4:40:54 PM EDT
There's an excellent "sticky" thread over on GT, under General Glocking, regarding KB's. Lots of good information from folks who actually know something about Glocks and firearms in general. (and at least ONE who's blown up a Glock)
Link Posted: 3/10/2005 1:52:30 AM EDT
Where do I find this sticky? GT?
Link Posted: 3/10/2005 3:30:29 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/10/2005 3:35:21 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Hawkeye:

Originally Posted By LVACGAR:
Where do I find this sticky? GT?



www.glocktalk.com



A Brief Primer on KB's by WalterGA
Link Posted: 3/10/2005 5:34:46 PM EDT
Back in 1996 I kaboomed my first Glock, a G22. I bought it slightly used and took it home and had it for approx. 4 months. I had put approx. 800rnds through it and was testing Fed 155 Hydra shoks. About the 4th round came a real loud boom. I did not know what it was and kind of looked at the side of my pistol and saw the extractor was gone. I popped the mag out and found that the front of the my was really smoking. I poured some water on it because it made me real nervous. I was unable to pull the slide back. I called a gunsmith and he told me to bring it in. I know that the round went down range because I had the correct # of holes in the target. When I got to his place he called our local Glock sales rep and he came right over. He was able to open the slide. The brass was stuck in the chamber but there was no back to the brass at all it was just a hollow tube. Primer was gone as well as the brass the primer fits in. He updated my Glock to the 1996 standards and I went home.
About 2 weeks later I was trying Rem 155 JHP and the gun fired but jammed. The bass was jammed into the barrel again. It was also torn from the back near the rim approx. 1/8 of an inch. I called up the rep again and he had me come back into the store where he again fixed it. I advised him that I did not trust this gun and that I had been thinking about buying a G23 but I did not know at this point. He told me he would send it to G.A. and have it checked and the company. About 2 weeks later he called and said it was back and that everything was okay. I again told him that I did not trust the gun and he took a brand new G22 out of the case at the gun store and made a trade for mine. I have had this G22 for 9 years with no problems at all. I now own a G17, 19, 23, 27 ,32 and the G22. I have not blown any of them up nor had any problems with any of them.
I think that it was all ammo related and that the companys now have a good handle on trhe .40 S&W and don't think that there are to many problems with kabooms anymore.

P.S. If you check another of my posts you will find that all of my Glocks have reen regulated to "Safe Queens" because I am in love with my S&W 1911!!!
Link Posted: 3/10/2005 5:48:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Peter556:
Back in 1996 I kaboomed my first Glock, a G22. I bought it slightly used and took it home and had it for approx. 4 months. I had put approx. 800rnds through it and was testing Fed 155 Hydra shoks. About the 4th round came a real loud boom. I did not know what it was and kind of looked at the side of my pistol and saw the extractor was gone. I popped the mag out and found that the front of the my was really smoking. I poured some water on it because it made me real nervous. I was unable to pull the slide back. I called a gunsmith and he told me to bring it in. I know that the round went down range because I had the correct # of holes in the target. When I got to his place he called our local Glock sales rep and he came right over. He was able to open the slide. The brass was stuck in the chamber but there was no back to the brass at all it was just a hollow tube. Primer was gone as well as the brass the primer fits in. He updated my Glock to the 1996 standards and I went home.
About 2 weeks later I was trying Rem 155 JHP and the gun fired but jammed. The bass was jammed into the barrel again. It was also torn from the back near the rim approx. 1/8 of an inch. I called up the rep again and he had me come back into the store where he again fixed it. I advised him that I did not trust this gun and that I had been thinking about buying a G23 but I did not know at this point. He told me he would send it to G.A. and have it checked and the company. About 2 weeks later he called and said it was back and that everything was okay. I again told him that I did not trust the gun and he took a brand new G22 out of the case at the gun store and made a trade for mine. I have had this G22 for 9 years with no problems at all. I now own a G17, 19, 23, 27 ,32 and the G22. I have not blown any of them up nor had any problems with any of them.
I think that it was all ammo related and that the companys now have a good handle on trhe .40 S&W and don't think that there are to many problems with kabooms anymore.

P.S. If you check another of my posts you will find that all of my Glocks have reen regulated to "Safe Queens" because I am in love with my S&W 1911!!!



Sounds like you have firsthand experience with the Federal rounds that weren't made to spec in the case webbing.
Link Posted: 3/10/2005 6:08:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Peter556:
P.S. If you check another of my posts you will find that all of my Glocks have reen regulated to "Safe
Queens" because I am in love with my S&W 1911!!!



If this is the case you can just leave the Glock forum right now and never come back! But before you go sell me your G17 & G19 at a super low, two for one price, mmmkay?
Link Posted: 3/11/2005 5:28:22 AM EDT
Of course this is just purely anecdotal, but I've fired more than 150,000 rounds of my reloads through my Glocks; most have been .45ACP. I've also reloaded and run over 10,000 .400 Cor-Bons and over 3000 rounds of .40 Super through my G21's and G30. I reload .45ACP until the necks split.

The only problem I ever had with shooting reloads through my Glocks was when I let a .400 Cor-Bon feedramp setback get by me...blew up my original G21. I was guilty of several errors: (1) Didn't carefully inspect the round after the jam; (2) was using powder that was too fast for that round (AA#2); was using relatively heavy bullets (180gr.).

Even though the KB was clearly my fault, Glock sold me a replacment, 3rd gen. G21 for $250, plus taxes; threw in a new set of Trijicons; let me keep my original G21 barrel as a spare; returned my aftermarket, blown-up barrel and my aftermarket 3.5# connector to me. It'd be interesting to see if one would get "such a deal" from any other firearms manufacturer.

Having said all the above, I wouldn't own/reload for a Glock .40 or .357 Sig on a bet.
Link Posted: 3/11/2005 7:19:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By The_Beer_Slayer:

Originally Posted By M4arc:
Also let me add this: you are going to hear the team nonsupported chamber a lot. The term is completely overused and those that are using it are clueless. Any handgun that uses the modified Browning design automatically has a partially supported chamber. So when you hear them spewing garbage about Glocks having a unsupported chamber you'll know to never listen to a bit of advice they offer again because they are either too lazy or too dumb to do a little research on their own.




except that the glock does have a significantly larger unsupported area than most other designs. most semi's are unsupported to a point glock takes it a good bit further.



True. Reason being, it adds a higher level of reliability.
Link Posted: 3/11/2005 7:30:42 AM EDT
wow..i never seen or had a gun brown up or got messed up. I like how Glock handled your issues with either good trade or discounted price.
Link Posted: 3/11/2005 2:33:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By The_Beer_Slayer:

Originally Posted By M4arc:
Also let me add this: you are going to hear the team nonsupported chamber a lot. The term is completely overused and those that are using it are clueless. Any handgun that uses the modified Browning design automatically has a partially supported chamber. So when you hear them spewing garbage about Glocks having a unsupported chamber you'll know to never listen to a bit of advice they offer again because they are either too lazy or too dumb to do a little research on their own.




except that the glock does have a significantly larger unsupported area than most other designs. most semi's are unsupported to a point glock takes it a good bit further.



Once again.

Some Glocks have more "unsupported area" than others. You can tell if you have one of these by looking at your fired brass. If it clearly has a bulge at the rear then you have a Glock that could have a KB someday.

The vast majority of Glocks have enough "support" and the brass does not bulge. These Glocks have no more chance of blowing up than any other gun.
Link Posted: 3/11/2005 4:00:50 PM EDT
So long as you use good, U.S. manufacture, FACTORY ammo with your Glock .40s they will almost certainly be just fine.

I seldom differ with my friend Hawkeye on many things firearms related, but I do differ slightly on this. The .40S&W and the .357Sig are both proving to be excellent self defense rounds...yes, Hawkeye, placement still matters more, and I still own two Glock 9mms!...you will never hear ME badmouth the full power 9mm!

But there is no way, no how, I would ever..repeat, EVER...reload for either the .40 or the .357Sig in the Glock frame. (Yeah, I know guys who do...but not me!)

There are both not only very high pressure cartridges, they are also cartridges that "peak" with their "time/pressure spike" extremely rapidly...that is, they are at max pressure almost instantly. Get a tiny bit of bullet setback or such and your gun is toast!

Thus, there have been, and will continue to be, millions...literally...of trouble free factory .40 rounds fired from standard Glock 22, 23 and 27 pistols every month across the country. You will be fine with another Glock .40...but if you decide to reload, it is your azz!
Link Posted: 3/11/2005 4:07:16 PM EDT
IMO...

In .40 S&W, I would recommend HK. Will be my next purchase.

In 9mm, I would recommend Glock. I have a G17 and I love it.

In .45 ACP, I would recommend a 1911. I have a series 70 Colt repro and I love it.



coburn
Link Posted: 3/11/2005 5:12:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ikor:
So long as you use good, U.S. manufacture, FACTORY ammo with your Glock .40s they will almost certainly be just fine.




You will be fine IF your fired brass does not show any sign of bulging or swelling at 6 o,clock.
Link Posted: 3/11/2005 5:39:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By cornbread2:

Originally Posted By ikor:
So long as you use good, U.S. manufacture, FACTORY ammo with your Glock .40s they will almost certainly be just fine.




You will be fine IF your fired brass does not show any sign of bulging or swelling at 6 o,clock.



So you're saying that if your handgun is going to Kaboom or suffer a case failure you will be able to tell ahead of time by checking your brass?

I'm certainly no expert but several years ago I suffered a case failure in my H&K USP9 and I had never seen any of my brass budged or swelled up to that point or after that point. I contributed it to the brass, not the chamber/feedramp area.

Link Posted: 3/11/2005 6:43:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/11/2005 6:46:01 PM EDT by cornbread2]
The majority of Glock k-booms I have seen photos of involved the case failing at 6 o'clock because of a lack of case support in this area.

SOME Glocks have less support at 6 o'clock than others. It is just a result of the varaition of the parts and how they fit and how they are made.

Some lack support so much that they allow the brass to swell to a huge degree and if you have a Glock that does this it is just a matter of time before you have a case to blow out. It could come from a piece of brass that is weak or from a round that is loaded too hot or because the bullet gets shoved back.

The majority of Glock pistols have enough support at the bottom of the chamber and the brass does not swell. It is these guns that fire thousands of rounds and even reloads with no problems.

If you have a Glock that swells the case then you need to send it back to Glock or replace the barrel yourself because trouble is heading you way.
Link Posted: 3/13/2005 10:00:00 AM EDT
Thanks for all your input. After reading the recommended discussions, I think I will keep my glock .40. I am just not a 9mm fan, regardless of capacity or price issues. I am an excellent shot, but the power factor is too weak for me. I may just get my next Glock in .45. I will however never reload for the Glocks.
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