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9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 9/4/2010 4:37:31 PM EDT
Today I disassembled my issued Glock 22 for a light cleaning, and a small piece of black plastic fell out. I looked at the frame and the small angled plastic in front of the front slide rail had broken off on the left slide. The right side appears to be cracked and on the verge of breaking off.

Gun:
Standard G22 with Trijicon Night Sites
Streamlight TLR 1
Standard Recoil Spring and Guide Rod.

I have contacted a suspervisor and am waiting for direction. I swapped in a spare unused spring/guide rod.

Is this gun unshootable. Also I sanded down the finger bumps cause they are in the middle of my fingers when I grip, so I'm waiting for that ass chewing.
Link Posted: 9/4/2010 5:11:10 PM EDT
Sometimes some polymer flakes off the frame where the slide hits the steel insert.

Is this where?
Link Posted: 9/4/2010 5:48:38 PM EDT
Yep but the left side is totally gone, exposing the steel rail embedded in the frame.
Link Posted: 9/4/2010 10:20:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/4/2010 10:20:36 PM EDT by 762minigun2]
Ouch! do you have the serial prefix?
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 5:11:42 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2010 6:24:54 AM EDT by GreenMarauder]
Dont worry its a Glock they will more than stand behind it. This is one I bought online, Police turn ins G23 2nd gen. when I got it home and striped it down this is what I found NOT HAPPY . I called Glock told them they told me to send it back and 3 weeks later I had a almost new gun they updated it with a new 3rd. gen. frame and replaced most of the parts in the slide and frame.

http://i303.photobucket.com/albums/nn153/Glock-N/6b371622.jpg
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 5:43:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2010 5:47:26 AM EDT by big_joe555]
Serial Prefix is LPAXXX



I tore apart my personal G22 and it has slight wear. I also looked at another Deputy's G22 and there is polymer starting to warp from Impact, but no stress crack etc..
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 7:05:03 AM EDT
It's no secret that the .40 and 357 Glocks take quite a battering. The frame was built around 9mm, and the recoil springs are the same weight. The slide doesn't have enough mass added for the .40, either. Changing your recoil springs out every 2500 rounds is about all you can do.

Keep us updated.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 7:58:42 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2010 8:03:21 AM EDT by Melendez402]
I hate 40's and Rum
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 8:30:55 AM EDT
Let us know what the dep says about your "frame mod". Hope you get out of that one.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 12:31:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By thesmiter1:
It's no secret that the .40 and 357 Glocks take quite a battering. The frame was built around 9mm, and the recoil springs are the same weight. The slide doesn't have enough mass added for the .40, either. Changing your recoil springs out every 2500 rounds is about all you can do.

Keep us updated.

I've found that using a captured steel rod and a 20# recoil spring solved any issues with my G22. I have well over 27,000rds through it and don't have any issues at all.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 8:48:04 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2010 8:52:14 PM EDT by thesmiter1]
Originally Posted By COSteve:

Originally Posted By thesmiter1:
It's no secret that the .40 and 357 Glocks take quite a battering. The frame was built around 9mm, and the recoil springs are the same weight. The slide doesn't have enough mass added for the .40, either. Changing your recoil springs out every 2500 rounds is about all you can do.

Keep us updated.

I've found that using a captured steel rod and a 20# recoil spring solved any issues with my G22. I have well over 27,000rds through it and don't have any issues at all.


I'm sure a heavier spring and regular maintenance would make a Glock in .40 or 357 last just about as long as any pistol could. However, this may not be an option for many, due to department or agency policy. In that case, the most one can do is simply change the factory recoil spring every 2500 rounds. Unfortunate, really. But the Gen 4 should (finally) alleviate this issue completely. It just sucks for those stuck with the combo of Gen 3 and department policy.

Edit: just out of curiosity, which captured guide rod(s) would you recommend? And how often should you replace the springs, and the steel rod itself?
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 9:16:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By thesmiter1:

In that case, the most one can do is simply change the factory recoil spring every 2500 rounds. Unfortunate, really.

The recommended replacement interval of 3000rds is not unreasonable. It is inline with other service pistols, most recommending replacement between 1000-5000rds. If Glock thought they needed 20lb. springs they would add them.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 9:46:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2010 10:12:30 PM EDT by thesmiter1]
Originally Posted By GLOCKREAPER:

Originally Posted By thesmiter1:

In that case, the most one can do is simply change the factory recoil spring every 2500 rounds. Unfortunate, really.

The recommended replacement interval of 3000rds is not unreasonable. It is inline with other service pistols, most recommending replacement between 1000-5000rds. If Glock thought they needed 20lb. springs they would add them.


They did add heavier springs, but only with the Gen 4 Glocks. The Gen 4 Glock 17 also has a lighter spring (02) than the Gen 4 Glock 22. Why would the Gen 4 Glock 22s merit a heavier spring, but not the Gen 3 Glock 22s? Why make the Gen 4 at all?

The Gen 3 could have been modified to accept backstraps and a texture change. Yet they also changed the design of the slide and frame, all to accommodate a new recoil spring. There IS a reason for the heavier recoil spring. To think otherwise is just silly.

Glock did something about it with the Gen 4. That's the real proof...
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 7:06:42 AM EDT

Originally Posted By thesmiter1:
Originally Posted By COSteve:

Originally Posted By thesmiter1:
It's no secret that the .40 and 357 Glocks take quite a battering. The frame was built around 9mm, and the recoil springs are the same weight. The slide doesn't have enough mass added for the .40, either. Changing your recoil springs out every 2500 rounds is about all you can do.

Keep us updated.

I've found that using a captured steel rod and a 20# recoil spring solved any issues with my G22. I have well over 27,000rds through it and don't have any issues at all.

Edit: just out of curiosity, which captured guide rod(s) would you recommend? And how often should you replace the springs, and the steel rod itself?

From another post:

Originally Posted By Mike92GT:
Who makes a good stainless rod? I see there are several brands available. Is one better than the others? ISMI, Aro-Tek, Wolff, etc. I've got one of each on your list and can't tell the difference between them.

I've changed out my flat wound ISMI springs every 10K rounds on my captured rods. The rods themselves hold up just fine.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 8:33:17 AM EDT
Originally Posted By COSteve:

Originally Posted By thesmiter1:
Originally Posted By COSteve:

Originally Posted By thesmiter1:
It's no secret that the .40 and 357 Glocks take quite a battering. The frame was built around 9mm, and the recoil springs are the same weight. The slide doesn't have enough mass added for the .40, either. Changing your recoil springs out every 2500 rounds is about all you can do.

Keep us updated.

I've found that using a captured steel rod and a 20# recoil spring solved any issues with my G22. I have well over 27,000rds through it and don't have any issues at all.

Edit: just out of curiosity, which captured guide rod(s) would you recommend? And how often should you replace the springs, and the steel rod itself?

From another post:

Originally Posted By Mike92GT:
Who makes a good stainless rod? I see there are several brands available. Is one better than the others? ISMI, Aro-Tek, Wolff, etc. I've got one of each on your list and can't tell the difference between them.

I've changed out my flat wound ISMI springs every 10K rounds on my captured rods. The rods themselves hold up just fine.


Thanks much. Looks like I should have reread the thread first...
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 12:18:02 PM EDT
Originally Posted By thesmiter1:
Originally Posted By GLOCKREAPER:

Originally Posted By thesmiter1:

In that case, the most one can do is simply change the factory recoil spring every 2500 rounds. Unfortunate, really.

The recommended replacement interval of 3000rds is not unreasonable. It is inline with other service pistols, most recommending replacement between 1000-5000rds. If Glock thought they needed 20lb. springs they would add them.


They did add heavier springs, but only with the Gen 4 Glocks. The Gen 4 Glock 17 also has a lighter spring (02) than the Gen 4 Glock 22. Why would the Gen 4 Glock 22s merit a heavier spring, but not the Gen 3 Glock 22s? Why make the Gen 4 at all?

The Gen 3 could have been modified to accept backstraps and a texture change. Yet they also changed the design of the slide and frame, all to accommodate a new recoil spring. There IS a reason for the heavier recoil spring. To think otherwise is just silly.

Glock did something about it with the Gen 4. That's the real proof...


i agree, but why not equip the GEN3 .40s with a heavier recoil spring too? Glock 9mm and 40/357 models come from the factory with the same spring weight... i have always found this to be odd... my thinking is a heavier spring for the 40/357 would be appropriate considering the increase in recoil over the almost identical 9mm models. maybe i'm missing something here.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 12:28:22 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Checkmate762:
Originally Posted By thesmiter1:
Originally Posted By GLOCKREAPER:

Originally Posted By thesmiter1:

In that case, the most one can do is simply change the factory recoil spring every 2500 rounds. Unfortunate, really.

The recommended replacement interval of 3000rds is not unreasonable. It is inline with other service pistols, most recommending replacement between 1000-5000rds. If Glock thought they needed 20lb. springs they would add them.


They did add heavier springs, but only with the Gen 4 Glocks. The Gen 4 Glock 17 also has a lighter spring (02) than the Gen 4 Glock 22. Why would the Gen 4 Glock 22s merit a heavier spring, but not the Gen 3 Glock 22s? Why make the Gen 4 at all?

The Gen 3 could have been modified to accept backstraps and a texture change. Yet they also changed the design of the slide and frame, all to accommodate a new recoil spring. There IS a reason for the heavier recoil spring. To think otherwise is just silly.

Glock did something about it with the Gen 4. That's the real proof...


i agree, but why not equip the GEN3 .40s with a heavier recoil spring too? Glock 9mm and 40/357 models come from the factory with the same spring weight... i have always found this to be odd... my thinking is a heavier spring for the 40/357 would be appropriate considering the increase in recoil over the almost identical 9mm models. maybe i'm missing something here.


I have no idea why they didn't simply increase the spring weight on the old rods. Maybe they didn't hold up as well. Maybe a dual-captive rod was necessary to strengthen the endurance and longevity of the assembly, which would be important to the 40/357, because they rely solely on the spring weight to slow the slide down, and not on the slide mass AND spring weight, like many other pistols.

In other words, the rate at which the springs wear out is more important to the 40/357 Glocks because they rely more heavily on the spring weight, so a tougher, longer lasting spring setup would benefit them more.

But your guess is as good as mine.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 1:17:46 PM EDT
Originally Posted By thesmiter1:
Originally Posted By Checkmate762:
Originally Posted By thesmiter1:
Originally Posted By GLOCKREAPER:

Originally Posted By thesmiter1:

In that case, the most one can do is simply change the factory recoil spring every 2500 rounds. Unfortunate, really.

The recommended replacement interval of 3000rds is not unreasonable. It is inline with other service pistols, most recommending replacement between 1000-5000rds. If Glock thought they needed 20lb. springs they would add them.


They did add heavier springs, but only with the Gen 4 Glocks. The Gen 4 Glock 17 also has a lighter spring (02) than the Gen 4 Glock 22. Why would the Gen 4 Glock 22s merit a heavier spring, but not the Gen 3 Glock 22s? Why make the Gen 4 at all?

The Gen 3 could have been modified to accept backstraps and a texture change. Yet they also changed the design of the slide and frame, all to accommodate a new recoil spring. There IS a reason for the heavier recoil spring. To think otherwise is just silly.

Glock did something about it with the Gen 4. That's the real proof...


i agree, but why not equip the GEN3 .40s with a heavier recoil spring too? Glock 9mm and 40/357 models come from the factory with the same spring weight... i have always found this to be odd... my thinking is a heavier spring for the 40/357 would be appropriate considering the increase in recoil over the almost identical 9mm models. maybe i'm missing something here.


I have no idea why they didn't simply increase the spring weight on the old rods. Maybe they didn't hold up as well. Maybe a dual-captive rod was necessary to strengthen the endurance and longevity of the assembly, which would be important to the 40/357, because they rely solely on the spring weight to slow the slide down, and not on the slide mass AND spring weight, like many other pistols.

In other words, the rate at which the springs wear out is more important to the 40/357 Glocks because they rely more heavily on the spring weight, so a tougher, longer lasting spring setup would benefit them more.

But your guess is as good as mine.


good point... this could very well be the reason for the GEN4s.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 1:23:45 PM EDT
Originally Posted By thesmiter1:
Originally Posted By GLOCKREAPER:

Originally Posted By thesmiter1:

In that case, the most one can do is simply change the factory recoil spring every 2500 rounds. Unfortunate, really.

The recommended replacement interval of 3000rds is not unreasonable. It is inline with other service pistols, most recommending replacement between 1000-5000rds. If Glock thought they needed 20lb. springs they would add them.


They did add heavier springs, but only with the Gen 4 Glocks. The Gen 4 Glock 17 also has a lighter spring (02) than the Gen 4 Glock 22. Why would the Gen 4 Glock 22s merit a heavier spring, but not the Gen 3 Glock 22s? Why make the Gen 4 at all?

The Gen 3 could have been modified to accept backstraps and a texture change. Yet they also changed the design of the slide and frame, all to accommodate a new recoil spring. There IS a reason for the heavier recoil spring. To think otherwise is just silly.

Glock did something about it with the Gen 4. That's the real proof...


Glock has run the same guide rod/recoil spring in the 9/40/357. As you noted the gen 4 9mms are being offered with the 02 assembly presumably because of too much spring tension.

My assumption was the changes to guide rod/recoil spring were due to the Gen 3 .40s problems when running a weapon
light. The gen 3 fix was new followers and mag springs with 11 coils. The gen 4 I believe to be a continuation of fixing the problem possibly to make the pistol less magazine specific.

Also the gen4 has a larger reversible mag release a very nice feature.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 4:29:41 PM EDT
No department policy is listed against firearm modifications, except that it cannot render the weapon unsafe for duty use. I guess seeing how old the policy manual ist maybe a hold over from the revolver days (hair trigger mods etc.)

As far as recoil sping goes, what is the round count for a "worn-out" spring? I was issued the gun in Feb. 2008. So, 100 rounds a year for qualification. Around 700 rds of SWAT training, and maybe 500 rounds of practice on my own. So 1400 rds or so far through the gun. I'm already aware of Glock 40/357 guns being under sprung. I do have a wolff 20Ibs spring and steel guide rod coming in for my personal G22.

I want a Sig, but fat chance with this department. Glock and Ford can do no wrong in No. 2's eyes.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 5:32:46 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2010 5:33:28 PM EDT by thesmiter1]
Originally Posted By big_joe555:
No department policy is listed against firearm modifications, except that it cannot render the weapon unsafe for duty use. I guess seeing how old the policy manual ist maybe a hold over from the revolver days (hair trigger mods etc.)

As far as recoil sping goes, what is the round count for a "worn-out" spring? I was issued the gun in Feb. 2008. So, 100 rounds a year for qualification. Around 700 rds of SWAT training, and maybe 500 rounds of practice on my own. So 1400 rds or so far through the gun. I'm already aware of Glock 40/357 guns being under sprung. I do have a wolff 20Ibs spring and steel guide rod coming in for my personal G22.

I want a Sig, but fat chance with this department. Glock and Ford can do no wrong in No. 2's eyes.


There have been some posts on this in another thread. Someone suggested using a ISMI captured recoil spring, coupled with a 20lb spring for the Glock 22. So your 20lb Wolff spring should be good to go. The other user said that he changes out his spring every 5k-10k. That would be a good benchmark for your Wolff spring. The Glock spring should be changed every 2500 on the 40s.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 8:47:13 PM EDT
Ok 2500 seems to be consensus, but my point is I had 1400 rds on the stock spring. So by that guideline, I would have 1100 rds to go, so maybe another year of shooting. I just don't think the frame will take that abuse. I'm not arguing any of the information listed here, and I appreciate it.

I'm very disappointed that this going on. It's my life when this gun goes Tits up. Additionally, I hate .40 S&W, give me 9mm 0r 45 ACP. My favorite pistol was my G17, I could shoot ragged holes all day long. I'm tempted to dump this gun in the bosses lap and walk around with a chunk of 2X4.

I can only hope with the current elections, we get a new Sheriff who isn't married to the Glock 22.

Link Posted: 9/6/2010 9:24:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2010 9:25:01 PM EDT by GLOCKREAPER]

Originally Posted By big_joe555:
but my point is I had 1400 rds on the stock spring.
At that round count it is a simple manufacturing defect. The frame would have done that even if it was built into a 17. Glock will replace the frame. It is still perfectly serviceable.

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