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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/16/2005 12:05:24 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/17/2005 1:37:31 PM EDT by RustedAce]
I want to know the date of manufacture of a FN hipower I have looked around online with no luck, it is marked : "Fabrique Nationale Herstal Belgique" underneath that "Browning patent depose" serial number 52157 on the slide and frame it has a "C' in front of the serial number but not on the barrel , barrel has serial number and CAL. 9m/m P on it.

Thanks in advance.

-Robert
Link Posted: 9/16/2005 5:16:26 PM EDT
If your S/N is indeed accurate, it pre-dates the info found in arfcom.

1959 S/N range is 85268-89687 & they go up from there. In 1964 they added the letter "T" & in other years they added other letters.

www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=5&f=39&t=8125&w is where I found this info.

Not much help, I know, but good luck.
Link Posted: 9/17/2005 5:44:42 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BobCole:
If your S/N is indeed accurate, it pre-dates the info found in arfcom.

1959 S/N range is 85268-89687 & they go up from there. In 1964 they added the letter "T" & in other years they added other letters.

www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=5&f=39&t=8125&w is where I found this info.

Not much help, I know, but good luck.




Any idea when the c was added in front of the number? This gun looks real old, ill post some pics at some point, but no ideas anyone?
Link Posted: 9/17/2005 10:18:21 AM EDT
Bowning added the "C" in the S/N in 1969. Sorry, I didn't catch that when I first read the thread!

Example = 69C1000 = 1969 mfgr with a S/N of 1000.

I would guess yours was built in the late 1960s. Should be a nice specimen!
Link Posted: 9/17/2005 11:27:48 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BobCole:
Bowning added the "C" in the S/N in 1969. Sorry, I didn't catch that when I first read the thread!

Example = 69C1000 = 1969 mfgr with a S/N of 1000.

I would guess yours was built in the late 1960s. Should be a nice specimen!




This C is in front of the number and has a space like this : C 52157


I will post a pic
Link Posted: 9/17/2005 11:31:15 AM EDT

Originally Posted By RustedAce:

Originally Posted By BobCole:
Bowning added the "C" in the S/N in 1969. Sorry, I didn't catch that when I first read the thread!

Example = 69C1000 = 1969 mfgr with a S/N of 1000.

I would guess yours was built in the late 1960s. Should be a nice specimen!




This C is in front of the number and has a space like this : C 52157


I will post a pic



2T54XX would be a
Link Posted: 9/17/2005 12:53:37 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/17/2005 1:06:35 PM EDT
2T54XX

any idea why my T is second in line behind the first number instead of the way their numbers are listed ? I'm a bit confused as to what year mine is.

IE:

1964 In 1964 the product code for the Hi-Power was the letter "T" 115823-T136-568

OR

In 1975 Browning standardized its serial number identification which it followed until 1998.
1. Hi-Power Type 2W5=40 S&W
245=9mm
2. Date of Manufacture
is a two digit code Z=1
Y=2
X=3
W=4
V=5
T=6
R=7
P=8
N=9
M=0
3. Serial Number
beginning with 01001
at the start of each year.



Serial
Number Example:
245RT01001

This would be a 9mm Hi-Power pistol, manufactured in 1976 with the serial number 01001

Link Posted: 9/17/2005 1:26:07 PM EDT




Link Posted: 9/18/2005 10:50:06 AM EDT
No help even with the pics, sheesh

Cmon guys! I cant find this anywhere online
Link Posted: 9/18/2005 5:32:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By RustedAce:
No help even with the pics, sheesh

Cmon guys! I cant find this anywhere online



Dude, sometimes things remain a mystery. Women, for example.

Yours was most likely built in the early 1970s, late-late 1960s, IMO.

Or, you could always drop a dime & call Browning in Utah & see what they can offer?

Link Posted: 9/18/2005 6:54:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BobCole:

Originally Posted By RustedAce:
No help even with the pics, sheesh

Cmon guys! I cant find this anywhere online





Or, you could always drop a dime & call Browning in Utah & see what they can offer?







Pretty sad, I never even thought of that.

Link Posted: 9/18/2005 7:30:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/18/2005 7:32:35 PM EDT by tfod]




This particular design of Hi-Power, is in my humble opinion, the best Hi-Power design, and possibly the greatest single action combat pistol design ever.

This pistol is set above from other is several ways. The first is the extended bushing. This bushing effectively protects the crown and barrel. The internal guide rod, as with other Hi-Power designs, lets the pistol be loaded and the action worked single handedly. The sights, although small, are effective (especially with the natural pointing of the pistol). The controls maintain large surface areas without the expense of being laterally obtrusive.

Yes, I would say you have an awesome pistol.
I consider mine one of the finest pistols ever made, and it is all stock.
Link Posted: 9/18/2005 7:43:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By tfod:
www.geocities.com/tfod/browning_4.jpg

www.geocities.com/tfod/browning_2.jpg

This particular design of Hi-Power, is in my humble opinion, the best Hi-Power design, and possibly the greatest single action combat pistol design ever.

This pistol is set above from other is several ways. The first is the extended bushing. This bushing effectively protects the crown and barrel. The internal guide rod, as with other Hi-Power designs, lets the pistol be loaded and the action worked single handedly. The sights, although small, are effective (especially with the natural pointing of the pistol). The controls maintain large surface areas without the expense of being laterally obtrusive.

Yes, I would say you have an awesome pistol.
I consider mine one of the finest pistols ever made, and it is all stock.



I always liked using that extended bushing to check for a loaded chamber. finger under the crown on the slide, slite pressure and bingo.
can't do that with the 1911 as far as I know

Link Posted: 9/18/2005 8:14:18 PM EDT
You can do single handed operations with a 1911 that does not have a full length guide rod. Full length guide rods like front slide serrations are unnecessary.
Link Posted: 9/18/2005 8:38:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By tfod:
You can do single handed operations with a 1911 that does not have a full length guide rod. Full length guide rods like front slide serrations are unnecessary.



I didn't mean to step on the 1911, i just am not that familliar with them.

thanks for the clarification.
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