Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 7/21/2005 10:15:48 PM EDT
I am thinking about putting an OD Green Duracoat on my Glock 22C but I was hoping to get some feed back from some people who have used Duracoat previously. Is it difficult to apply properly? How resilient is it to holster wear? Were you satisfied with the end results?
Link Posted: 7/23/2005 7:00:41 AM EDT
I was sure someone would reply to this by now. Anyway, I have a Colt Combat Commander that I plan to DuraCoat soon. I had applied KG GunKote to it before, as well as Brownell's baking laquer. Both were from spray cans. The KG flaked off with my thumbnail, while the Brownell's was a lot more durable. I prepped both very well, bead blasting the parts, then thoroughly degreasing them by soaking for several days, scrubbing, soaking, and finally spraying them down. I also pre-heated my parts, and sprayed in several uniform, thin coatings. In other words, I did everything possible to make them work.

What I've noticed is that stuff from spray cans sprays out in a much larger mist than an airbrush. Since I have an airbrush and airbrush compressor, I'm going to try the DuraCoat as soon as I'm done cutting up my Commander. I'm going to mill the slide today for forward cocking serrations and a French cut. When that's done, I'll try and spray it today. Anyway, I'll post my results. I plan to do normal shooting with it when done, and I'll let you know how durable it is after that happens.

Most guys I speak to are very happy with DuraCoat and also Norell's Moly Resin. If I remember correctly, Para Ordnance uses Lauer for their slides, and they hold up very well.
Link Posted: 7/23/2005 11:14:56 PM EDT
Just got done shooting a Browning Challenger II a few weeks back, and it turned out tits (was home on holiday for a while and went on a spraying craze coating everything that wasn't nail down).

I blasted the metal, and then let the parts soak in acetone until I was ready to paint (to make sure it was degreased). Tricks is to wear de-powdered latex gloves when you paint/ degrease (read put them on and go wash you hands using water), and let the painted parts dry for 24 hours before handling (takes a few weeks for the urethane to get bullet proof, so don't expect the pistol to be holster ready until then). Also, if you are using a compressor/airbrush, make sure that you have a dehumidifier in line.

Also, a little urethane goes a long way. Since Durcoat has to be mixed, I turned a little tester’s paint bottle into one of my air brush supply bottles. It's small (read enough paint to shot an entire pistol), and clear to see for mixing portions needed. Plus the bottom of the bottle is canted, and if you angle the pick up tube/bottle correctly, you can draw every drop of paint out of the bottle.

I spray at 45 lbs with almost a light fogging pattern spray for a matt like texture (match anodizing), and 50 lbs with thicker pattern for a smoother glossy type finish. Before you shoot, take a minute to adjust the air brush feed and air pressure on a piece of paper to get the desired finish before shooting the parts (Dura allows a flat finish, were moly will be glossy once baked).

As for wear proof, don't worry about it. If you do manage to scrap the finish, buff out the scratches with acetone on cloth patch, and just re-coat the section. Trust me, Duracoat/Polaine will out wear gun bluing by months of holster wear (and touch up on takes a few minutes to repair).

Now the fun part, Duracoat flat has a flat finish when sprayed (works great for a matt finish), but say that you want a shinny gleaming gloss finish, this ones a walk in the park also (even using flat). Shoot the finish a little on the heavy side, and let it sit for a few days. Then use a cotton cleaning patch lightly soaked in acetone, and gently polish out the parts to get them to a gleaming glass like smooth.
Link Posted: 7/24/2005 5:18:32 AM EDT
Thanks for the great tips!
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 10:13:04 AM EDT
Does Duracoat work on a stainless finish? A friend of mine has a Springfield G.I. that is stainless and he doesn't like the finish on it and wants to refinish it. He thought about selling it but wants to go with a bi-tone look, leaving the grip safety, trigger,hammer and so stainless and get the rest a flat black. I don't think parkerizing works on stainless correct? Or what do you experienced home refinishers recommend?
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 8:58:15 PM EDT
You just need to blast/surface the parts with an oxide media to give the coating something to bind to (read #120 to 220, or what every oxide combo you happen to have loaded in the cabnet at the time).

As for surface prepping the SS like parkerizing standard steel, doesn't need it. Just blast, degrease and coat.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 7:37:54 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Dano523:
You just need to blast/surface the parts with an oxide media to give the coating something to bind to (read #120 to 220, or what every oxide combo you happen to have loaded in the cabnet at the time).

As for surface prepping the SS like parkerizing standard steel, doesn't need it. Just blast, degrease and coat.



Alright, Thank you sir.
Link Posted: 8/8/2005 5:00:32 PM EDT
I dont know if you want to see this, but

Link Posted: 8/8/2005 5:01:30 PM EDT
and
Link Posted: 8/8/2005 5:02:35 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/8/2005 5:09:04 PM EDT by AZATHOTH777]
and this,

im just not too impressed, granted this is my 24/7/365 carry gun(hence the ware on both sides of the mag well, at work and off) this is my 8th finish for the frame, the slide is fact. black hard chrome and still in (relative) good shape... this might be your future.. hope not
Top Top