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Posted: 5/15/2005 6:10:40 PM EST
Yes, I know dry firing a 1911 is a no-no...but I'm wondering exactly what it does to the gun and why? Damage the firing pin?

And is it bad to fire it from half-cock, or is that kosher due to the minimal impact from the hammer?
Link Posted: 5/15/2005 6:13:28 PM EST
From what era are you getting this advice about dry firing?

Link Posted: 5/15/2005 6:40:08 PM EST

Originally Posted By sysop:
From what era are you getting this advice about dry firing?




Just what I always heard.

And that's why I asked, to learn.
Link Posted: 5/15/2005 6:54:40 PM EST
Dry-firing won't hurt it; it's a good way to practice trigger control.

Firing from half-cock? A 1911? This is an impossibility.
Link Posted: 5/15/2005 6:56:52 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/15/2005 6:57:40 PM EST by wildearp]

Originally Posted By Doucheatron3000:
Yes, I know dry firing a 1911 is a no-no...but I'm wondering exactly what it does to the gun and why? Damage the firing pin?

And is it bad to fire it from half-cock, or is that kosher due to the minimal impact from the hammer?



If you don't check for safe at least twice and dry fire in front of your television, it will damage your television.



Forgot to mention, don't leave home with a half-cock.....
Link Posted: 5/15/2005 6:59:24 PM EST
Link Posted: 5/15/2005 7:01:04 PM EST
Dry fire it all you want......................It is the best way to practice
Link Posted: 5/15/2005 8:25:00 PM EST
this is a topic I don't know much about either, are there specific types of firearms that should not be dry-fired? I was told that it isn't a good idea to dry fire my .22 rimfire pistol
Link Posted: 5/15/2005 9:26:22 PM EST

Originally Posted By JayJay4735:
this is a topic I don't know much about either, are there specific types of firearms that should not be dry-fired? I was told that it isn't a good idea to dry fire my .22 rimfire pistol

That's because the firing pin contacts the breech face in a .22 pistol. Centerfires don't have this problem.
Link Posted: 5/15/2005 10:19:48 PM EST
So I can dry fire my 1911s without a snapcap and it will not hurt it?
Link Posted: 5/15/2005 10:30:34 PM EST
Don't let the slide SLAM down on an empty chamber.
The hammer and sear engagement will be destroyed.
Link Posted: 5/16/2005 6:47:23 AM EST
Good to know, thanks for the info folks.


Originally Posted By Zardoz:
Firing from half-cock? A 1911? This is an impossibility.



I have a Delta Gold Cup. I can pull the hammer back most of the way, and it will stay back from the firing pin, enough so that is noticeable. If I am riging the hammer down from a full cock, and let off the trigger just after the hammer starts to move, this is where it will stop. If I pull the trigger again, the hammer will drop.

Perhaps I have simply been using the wrong terminology to refer to this position of the hammer.
Link Posted: 5/17/2005 9:23:14 AM EST

Originally Posted By Doucheatron3000:
Good to know, thanks for the info folks.


Originally Posted By Zardoz:
Firing from half-cock? A 1911? This is an impossibility.



I have a Delta Gold Cup. I can pull the hammer back most of the way, and it will stay back from the firing pin, enough so that is noticeable. If I am riging the hammer down from a full cock, and let off the trigger just after the hammer starts to move, this is where it will stop. If I pull the trigger again, the hammer will drop.

Perhaps I have simply been using the wrong terminology to refer to this position of the hammer.



Your pistol just has a sort of hammer safety that will "catch" the hammer if it slips from your finger while you are manually cocking it. Actually, the Kimber manual advises against both carrying the pistol in this configuration and riding the trigger down to this position (or all the way down for that matter). The manual says to simply make sure the gun is empty several times and then dry fire to properly close the hammer.
Link Posted: 5/17/2005 10:24:55 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/21/2005 6:32:13 AM EST by Dano523]
Now in the world of titanium firing pins, dry firing without a snap cap may cause the firing pin to snap in half (got to love that S/A drops them in the Trophy match). If in doubt, a snap cap is good insurance.


As for the safety sear half notch, depending on the design (full width or center retention point to protect the sear), you may be able to pull the trigger to allow the hammer to drop/touch the firing pin from the half-cocked position.

The purpose of the catch position on the trigger was that if the sear had bounce/wear that caused the hammer to slip when the slide closed, this position prevents the pistol from an AD. Originally, the catch point was a carry over from the 45 revolvers, but with the thumb safety completely blocking the hammer from falling when engaged, the pistol full cocked with the safety on is the best way to carry the pistol when loaded.

As for the full width design, anytime the hammer is retained/caught at this position, slight damage does take place to the sear. This leads to the burs on the sear, and increased trigger pull for break point. If you have a standard service trigger (4-6lbs) don't worry about it. But on the other hand, if your have the trigger set to 2 lbs, this contact is going to make a short life to the trigger job.
Link Posted: 5/17/2005 10:27:37 AM EST
Dry firiing is not bad for a 1911, in fact encouraged. I shoot IPSC/USPSA matches and probably dry fire more than I actually shoot. The only gun(s) that I heard you shouldn't dry fire are the 22 cal type pistols/rifles (correct me if I am wrong).
Link Posted: 5/17/2005 10:35:28 AM EST

Originally Posted By ARDunstan:
Don't let the slide SLAM down on an empty chamber.
The hammer and sear engagement will be destroyed.



Link Posted: 5/17/2005 12:50:57 PM EST

Originally Posted By npd233:

Originally Posted By ARDunstan:
Don't let the slide SLAM down on an empty chamber.
The hammer and sear engagement will be destroyed.


Absolutely. And remember to depress the mag catch when inserting a mag. And never leave it on half-cock. Or leave a round in the chamber with the hammer down. And have the name of your certified 1911 gunsmith tatooed to the inside of your left thigh....
Link Posted: 5/20/2005 2:21:37 PM EST
I believe it's not ood to dry fire cz52 also. But I have no idea why.
Link Posted: 5/21/2005 5:12:09 AM EST
Link Posted: 5/21/2005 5:14:08 AM EST
Link Posted: 5/21/2005 6:22:52 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/21/2005 6:23:23 AM EST by enigma1]

Originally Posted By ken_mays:

Originally Posted By Zardoz:
Dry-firing won't hurt it; it's a good way to practice trigger control.

Firing from half-cock? A 1911? This is an impossibility.



Not every 1911 hammer has the captive half-cock notch. You can drop the hammer from half-cock by pulling the trigger on these.



Possibly a 1911 "style" pistol

So it's raining, freezing or your just too damn lazy to go to the range/pit today huh ? Well here's the answer to your delima, just go the bottom of the page & check out the automated drills for your computer screen. Please do unload & double check

drills
Link Posted: 5/21/2005 8:00:40 AM EST

Originally Posted By ken_mays:

Originally Posted By Zardoz:
Dry-firing won't hurt it; it's a good way to practice trigger control.

Firing from half-cock? A 1911? This is an impossibility.



Not every 1911 hammer has the captive half-cock notch. You can drop the hammer from half-cock by pulling the trigger on these.

What I keyed in on was the word "firing", as in a full swing of the hammer. My SA will drop the hammer from the half-cock notch, but to me, that isn't actually dry-firing.

I know; I'm too nit-picky about some things...
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