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Posted: 8/16/2015 7:07:26 PM EST
Although I've been shooting for over 60 yrs, I'm new to the 1911, except for an 18 month stint in the RVN. My Range Officer LW Champion has arrived and she is a beauty. I have thus far fondled but not fired her. The trigger breaks like glass, but is heavy. In other pistols I've had I used a snap cap to protect the firing pin. They were usually supplied with new pistols. Not this time. Can I dry fire the RO without damaging it? I'm talking about several hundred times.
Link Posted: 8/16/2015 7:25:29 PM EST
You are gtg on the dry firing. Many pros will tell you they dry fire as much as they practice with live ammo. If you want to use snap caps, that is ok, but make sure you load them from a mag, not just dropping one in the chamber and letting the slide close on it. That could wear on/break the extractor.
Link Posted: 8/16/2015 8:43:14 PM EST
I've dry fired a 1911 tens of thousands of times and haven't ever seen a problem with the firing pin. Do check the firing pin spring regularly and keep spares on hand to change them if you see any broken coils. Also inspect the firing pin stop for cracks and change when they develop.
Link Posted: 8/17/2015 11:31:36 AM EST
Dry firing -- pulling the trigger and dropping the hammer -- does no harm to a 1911.

Dropping the slide on an empty gun DOES, eventually cause damage to the sear.

So pull the trigger, but lower the slide gently.
Link Posted: 8/17/2015 12:21:15 PM EST
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Originally Posted By RugRat:
Dry firing -- pulling the trigger and dropping the hammer -- does no harm to a 1911.

Dropping the slide on an empty gun DOES, eventually cause damage to the sear.

So pull the trigger, but lower the slide gently.
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Originally Posted By RugRat:
Dry firing -- pulling the trigger and dropping the hammer -- does no harm to a 1911.

Dropping the slide on an empty gun DOES, eventually cause damage to the sear.

So pull the trigger, but lower the slide gently.


This

Originally Posted By 1MoreFord:
I've dry fired a 1911 tens of thousands of times and haven't ever seen a problem with the firing pin. Do check the firing pin spring regularly and keep spares on hand to change them if you see any broken coils. Also inspect the firing pin stop for cracks and change when they develop.



This
Link Posted: 8/18/2015 11:52:22 PM EST
Go man go....the 1911 has an elegant firing pin of perfect shape to withstand stress.

The big No-No in dry firing is the M50 or M55 Reising.....the pins a so long an fragile, the tip peeks through the bolt face and they are known to snap. They also break under normal use....and why not? The damn things cycle at 800 rounds per minute. Don't believe the lying manuals.... They tried to replace the Thompson so they said 450 to 550 was the cycle rate..... No, way....I have personally broken at least one pin.
Link Posted: 8/19/2015 10:44:48 AM EST
I think a 1911 is probably the best pistol to withstand high amounts of dry-firing.
Link Posted: 8/20/2015 3:49:46 PM EST
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Originally Posted By d16man:
You are gtg on the dry firing. Many pros will tell you they dry fire as much as they practice with live ammo. If you want to use snap caps, that is ok, but make sure you load them from a mag, not just dropping one in the chamber and letting the slide close on it. That could wear on/break the extractor.
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^^^this

Some of the top competitive shooters do dry fire nearly as much as shoot live ammo, sometimes more if they have a long drive to an available range.

Snap caps are optional but, definitely load from the mag as stated above.
Link Posted: 8/27/2015 5:27:15 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/27/2015 11:16:09 AM EST
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Originally Posted By anothergene:
I just cut a piece of rubber tubing in half long ways to fit and dry fire away.

Also much quieter too.
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To fit what? Where? How?
Link Posted: 8/27/2015 1:31:01 PM EST
A-zoom's are 12 bucks on amazon for 5.

I just load one up and dry fire.
Link Posted: 8/27/2015 11:01:53 PM EST
The 1911 has the property that the firing pin will come through the firing port by almost 0.6 inches when the spring is not installed.
Thus, the only thing preventing the firing pin from going further than a couple of hundredths is the spring (which binds up).
So, the liability is that you cause extra wear on the firing pin spring.

On the other hand, I have thousands upon thousands of trigger depressions where the hammer hit the firing pin with nothing n the chamber on a 30 year old 1911.
Link Posted: 8/28/2015 2:04:26 PM EST
Is there any difference in simply pulling the hammer back, and racking the slide for dry firing? How about 70 VS. 80 series?
Link Posted: 8/28/2015 2:33:03 PM EST
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Originally Posted By zach_:
Is there any difference in simply pulling the hammer back, and racking the slide for dry firing? How about 70 VS. 80 series?
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none.
Link Posted: 8/28/2015 3:56:25 PM EST
In case no one caught all that. It doesn't hurt to dry file a 1911. It does hurt to release the slide from slide lock without a round being chambered. It does hurt to cock and fire (release) the hammer with the slide removed. It does hurt to release the slide on a round or snap cap already chambered. But straight up dry firing has never been an issue for my 1911's. It will however have a detrimental effect on your psyche if you don't adequately offset said practice with some real LIVE fire.
Link Posted: 8/28/2015 6:36:47 PM EST
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Originally Posted By zach_:
Is there any difference in simply pulling the hammer back, and racking the slide for dry firing? How about 70 VS. 80 series?
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There is one difference.

After a trigger job where the mating surfaces of the hammer and sear have been altered; you rack the slide back dozens of times trying to release the trigger at random intervals as the slide moves forward and witnessing that the hammer never fails to stay cocked.

As to cocking the hammer and then <maybe> a second later pulling the tirgger--there is no difference.
Link Posted: 8/28/2015 11:09:32 PM EST
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Originally Posted By zach_:
Is there any difference in simply pulling the hammer back, and racking the slide for dry firing? How about 70 VS. 80 series?
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Yes. Racking the slide simply to cock the hammer is ridiculous. Just cock it and drop it.
Link Posted: 8/29/2015 8:18:34 PM EST
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Originally Posted By 1saxman:


Yes. Racking the slide simply to cock the hammer is ridiculous. Just cock it and drop it.
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Originally Posted By 1saxman:
Originally Posted By zach_:
Is there any difference in simply pulling the hammer back, and racking the slide for dry firing? How about 70 VS. 80 series?


Yes. Racking the slide simply to cock the hammer is ridiculous. Just cock it and drop it.
The GLOCK mindset is with me to this day. My 1911 is an 80 series. I have read about the differences between the 70 and 80 series 1911's, but I don't really understand. Just asking. Today's range trip was great. The cleaning afterwards seemed to show that shooting the 1911 makes it smoother. I guess I am at about 900 or 1000 rounds.
Link Posted: 8/29/2015 8:21:42 PM EST
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Originally Posted By zach_:
The GLOCK mindset is with me to this day. My 1911 is an 80 series. I have read about the differences between the 70 and 80 series 1911's, but I don't really understand. Just asking. Today's range trip was great. The cleaning afterwards seemed to show that shooting the 1911 makes it smoother. I guess I am at about 900 or 1000 rounds.
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Originally Posted By zach_:
Originally Posted By 1saxman:
Originally Posted By zach_:
Is there any difference in simply pulling the hammer back, and racking the slide for dry firing? How about 70 VS. 80 series?


Yes. Racking the slide simply to cock the hammer is ridiculous. Just cock it and drop it.
The GLOCK mindset is with me to this day. My 1911 is an 80 series. I have read about the differences between the 70 and 80 series 1911's, but I don't really understand. Just asking. Today's range trip was great. The cleaning afterwards seemed to show that shooting the 1911 makes it smoother. I guess I am at about 900 or 1000 rounds.

80 series has a lever that depresses the FP block plunger when you pull the trigger.

Two extra parts in the frame, then the plunger and spring in the slide, also an 80 specific firing pin which is compatible with the block.
Link Posted: 9/1/2015 10:14:50 AM EST
Dry firing won't hurt anything, and is good practice.
In a pistol with a trigger job, the hammer/sear engagement can (and should) be protected: always have the trigger pulled back whenever the slide goes forward, so that the hammer and sear do not batter. Some folks object to this on the grounds of safety, but that's how the gun cycles in live fire. Perhaps it's unsafe with those who really shouldn't be handling any sort of power tool or sharp instrument.

It is also possible to use a pencil to "shoot groups" at home: tape a piece of paper to a vertical surface and draw a small bullseye on it, drop the pencil down the barrel, and stand so the muzzle is about an inch from the paper. The firing pin impact drives the pencil forward, marking the paper with your "group" about 1/2 inch below the bullseye. Obviously, there is some slop between the pencil and the .45 bore, but it's remarkably consistent for all that.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 3:11:26 PM EST
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Originally Posted By GreenBastard:

80 series has a lever that depresses the FP block plunger when you pull the trigger.

Two extra parts in the frame, then the plunger and spring in the slide, also an 80 specific firing pin which is compatible with the block.
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Originally Posted By GreenBastard:
Originally Posted By zach_:
Originally Posted By 1saxman:
Originally Posted By zach_:
Is there any difference in simply pulling the hammer back, and racking the slide for dry firing? How about 70 VS. 80 series?


Yes. Racking the slide simply to cock the hammer is ridiculous. Just cock it and drop it.
The GLOCK mindset is with me to this day. My 1911 is an 80 series. I have read about the differences between the 70 and 80 series 1911's, but I don't really understand. Just asking. Today's range trip was great. The cleaning afterwards seemed to show that shooting the 1911 makes it smoother. I guess I am at about 900 or 1000 rounds.

80 series has a lever that depresses the FP block plunger when you pull the trigger.

Two extra parts in the frame, then the plunger and spring in the slide, also an 80 specific firing pin which is compatible with the block.
I did not ask the question correctly. Will the dry firing method of pulling back the hammer, as opposed to racking the slide make a difference between the 70 and 80 series?
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 3:52:03 PM EST
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Originally Posted By zach_:
I did not ask the question correctly. Will the dry firing method of pulling back the hammer, as opposed to racking the slide make a difference between the 70 and 80 series?
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Originally Posted By zach_:
Originally Posted By GreenBastard:
Originally Posted By zach_:
Originally Posted By 1saxman:
Originally Posted By zach_:
Is there any difference in simply pulling the hammer back, and racking the slide for dry firing? How about 70 VS. 80 series?


Yes. Racking the slide simply to cock the hammer is ridiculous. Just cock it and drop it.
The GLOCK mindset is with me to this day. My 1911 is an 80 series. I have read about the differences between the 70 and 80 series 1911's, but I don't really understand. Just asking. Today's range trip was great. The cleaning afterwards seemed to show that shooting the 1911 makes it smoother. I guess I am at about 900 or 1000 rounds.

80 series has a lever that depresses the FP block plunger when you pull the trigger.

Two extra parts in the frame, then the plunger and spring in the slide, also an 80 specific firing pin which is compatible with the block.
I did not ask the question correctly. Will the dry firing method of pulling back the hammer, as opposed to racking the slide make a difference between the 70 and 80 series?


No. The trigger actuates everything in either case.
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