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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 5/29/2003 12:06:44 AM EDT
Assuming one wanted to learn how to accurize a 1911, does it matter which one they start off with? If you're going to be replacing parts and hand fitting and stuff like that, is there an advantage with starting with a decent gun, or should one just start with a Charles Daly or Auto Ordinance?
Link Posted: 5/29/2003 12:16:54 AM EDT
Those are of such low quality that it would be a waste of money to put sweet parts on them...I am not sure but I think you can buy Springfield raw frames for a fair price which are forged and are of pretty fair quality....there are probably a few other forged frames out there,too, which would more readily suit your needs.
Link Posted: 5/29/2003 1:03:50 AM EDT
Ah, I reckon I didn't think about the actual quality of the metal in the frame. Good point.
Link Posted: 5/29/2003 1:15:43 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/29/2003 1:46:21 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Lumpy196:
Caspian



I got all excited when I looked at their web site, then I noticed where they said that their receivers were cast by Ruger...
Link Posted: 5/29/2003 6:48:30 AM EDT
If you are only "practicing" (like a doctor), why use a good frame?
In your own words, "learn" was used.
On the other hand, if you know what you are doing and have a goal, then a quality frame is the way to go.
Years ago, a GI frame was used.
When GI .45s were getting more rare, series '70 parts were utilized, until they started to dry up, then Norincos were used as a basis for customizing. Not to mention aftermarket frames, like "essex" or "ranger", to name a few.
I would consider looking for a holster worn, but still tight, older Colt...you not only have something to shoot as you build it up, but a base line to gauge any accurizing improvements.
(plus some good parts included)
And, if done right, it still says COLT on it.
Just my early morning random thoughts...
Link Posted: 5/29/2003 7:24:39 AM EDT
I agree, if I was going to build up a gun from a base, get the Pony!
Link Posted: 5/29/2003 8:42:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By anothergene:
If you are only "practicing" (like a doctor), why use a good frame?
In your own words, "learn" was used.
On the other hand, if you know what you are doing and have a goal, then a quality frame is the way to go.
Years ago, a GI frame was used.
When GI .45s were getting more rare, series '70 parts were utilized, until they started to dry up, then Norincos were used as a basis for customizing. Not to mention aftermarket frames, like "essex" or "ranger", to name a few.
I would consider looking for a holster worn, but still tight, older Colt...you not only have something to shoot as you build it up, but a base line to gauge any accurizing improvements.
(plus some good parts included)
And, if done right, it still says COLT on it.
Just my early morning random thoughts...



That was what I was thinking with the Charles Daly. I figured I could get a $300 gun to learn on, then maybe move on to something else. I didn't think about looking for a used one, but that seems like a good plan. Thanks for the replys.
Link Posted: 5/29/2003 2:52:30 PM EDT
I have learned alot from my pawnshop purchased, $300 Charles Daly. Out of spec parts, holes, screws etc. and a relatively cheap price to begin with allowed me to do some work that I would have been less than excited to do on my Springfields or Colts.

A Daly can be made to be a good shooter, but they are put together with junk. To date, the following modifications have been made to my Daly project gun:


Grip bushings and grip screws - originals were not staked or loc-tited and were threaded to a nonstandard thread. Replaced with Caspian grip bushings and hex head screws.

Slide release and ambi-safety - Dont go out on a windy day with the originals or you'll take off. Removed LOTS of metal to make these more aesthetically pleasing and practical.

Ambi-safety - Had to deepen the detent groove, almost non existant.

Slide stop - right side of the frame had a smaller diameter hole than the left, would not allow after market slide stop or correct seating of the factory original slide stop.

Sear - factory cut to .025, restoned to .020.

Hammer - surfaces of the hammer hooks and half-cock safety were rough and uneven. Half-cock hooks had a small imperfection that was notching the sear. Filed hammer hooks to .020 and filed out half-cock imperfection.

Disconnector - too short, caused the gun to not disconnect and create a potentially unsafe condition. This was one of the most troubling issues I had with this guns crappy parts. Surfaces were not polished and factory part was just plain crappy. This part I replaced completely. Also note, the disconnector channel in the frame was VERY rough and had to be filed and polished alot! They really cut corners with these frames.

Barrel - like most factory guns, the barrel lugs were sharp. I usually radius the barrel lugs and slide lugs to smooth things up. Also, the barrel link pin is undersized and a punched detent held it in. This was corrected by pressing in a correctly sized link pin. Throated the barrel and frame to eliminate some ammo problems and smooth the feeding of the gun.

Springs - changed all around, substandard originals.

Barrel Bushing - pretty rough, polished for fit.

Grips - you may be able to live with the factory grips but I couldnt - replaced with wood.

Extractor - amazingly, although cast and third world country looking, all angles were good and just needed a slight polishing.

Ejector - wrong angle, filed to the right angle.

Grip saftey and mainspring housing - Mainspring housing was crappy fit and a little loose, wanted to change it but the grip safety hooks were at such an angle that the aftermarket mainspring housing would push the saftey all the way to the frame. Not wanting to replace both parts or have what amounted to a pinned saftey, I left both those parts on the frame.

Maybe everyone elses Daly was not in as much need of tuning, but once all that work was done - the gun functioned flawlessly. I'm pretty picky about a 1911's function but the disconnector issue was the most troubling to me. I would check this first in the store if your considering a Daly, the rest is just routine maintenance for a garage gunsmith! Good Luck!
Link Posted: 5/30/2003 12:54:52 PM EDT
I take it that your CD 1911 is NOT one of the newer ones? The new ones that I've handled have been rather decent...
Link Posted: 5/30/2003 1:55:16 PM EDT
My Daly did not have the newer, Novak knock-off type sights. I'm not sure what its age was in relation to newer models.

Dont get me wrong, the gun turned into a good shooter and some of the detail work that I thought needed to be done I would do on any 1911 that comes through my hands. If the price is right, I'd still buy another Daly and make it into a decent shooter. You can never have enought 1911's!!
Link Posted: 5/30/2003 2:16:00 PM EDT
I'm leaning toward the new Auto-Ordnance. I hear that the underlying materials have improved quite a bit since Kahr bought them. Anyone know of an online price that sells them so that I can check prices?
Link Posted: 5/30/2003 2:25:59 PM EDT
Gunsamerica.com has 'em from $450 & up
Link Posted: 5/30/2003 2:35:56 PM EDT

Originally Posted By anothergene:
Gunsamerica.com has 'em from $450 & up



Wow! For that price, I might as well buy a Springfield. I thought that the AO was supposed to be cheap?
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