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Posted: 3/14/2005 5:26:41 PM EST
I know the shok buff are supposed to protect the slide and frame from slamming with each other but would the shok buff affect reliability? Would you install a shok buff on your carry piece?

Thank you for your input and advice,
556man
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 5:47:47 PM EST
I wouldn't think that they decrease reliability.

Before doing anything to a pistol you carry you should test it with the part in it.
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 6:02:45 PM EST
Both 1911's I tried a shok-buff in had short cycling problems.
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 6:07:11 PM EST
No.
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 6:13:00 PM EST
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 6:20:02 PM EST
I always shoot with shok buffers in my 1911s. I NEVER have malfunctions. That said, I install them when I go shooting and take them out when I clean the pistol for carry. It's not that big a deal to put them in and take em out. Btw, I usually burn at least 150 or so rounds each time I pull my .45s out to shoot, might as well save the wear and tear.
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 6:20:51 PM EST
I use them in guns when they are on the range with no problems whatsoever, until they get batterred. I've had them flatten out and cause the gun to lock so tight that it could not be disassembled on the range. Whether you like them or not, it's wise to take them off when it comes time to carry the gun. Most manufacturers say they are good for 500- 1000 rounds. I've used at least half a dozen makes, and I've had some go as soon as 200 rounds. Whenever I build a gun for someone and they request them, I always warn them to take them out when it comes time to carry CCW or on duty.
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 7:12:52 PM EST
I've been using the King's FL guide rod and double recoil springs, with 2 Kings shock-buffs for my 10mm Delta Elite Gold Cup, no problems so far. But, I had one gunsmith tell me that it kind of throws the timing off, but then again, I've never personally had a problem with them.
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 7:14:30 PM EST
... No

... John Moses Browning didn't think he needed one either

Link Posted: 3/14/2005 7:36:31 PM EST

Originally Posted By Winston_Wolf:
... No

... John Moses Browning didn't think he needed one either




Not trying to flame but he didn't use extended safeties, beavertails, usable sights, ramped barrels, mag funnels, extended ejectors, FLGR's, etc, etc, etc.

While some of these I find useful, and some of them I find superfluous, the barebones 1911 had plenty of room for customization that made it more useful for a certain users tasks. The gun JMB made was for the faceless and voiceless GI.

Link Posted: 3/14/2005 8:52:06 PM EST
Thanks to everybody for your input and advice. I've decided to remove the shok buff while I carry my 1911. I would install them back though when going to the shooting range to practice.

Thanks again,
556man
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 8:57:34 PM EST

Originally Posted By 556man:
Thanks to everybody for your input and advice. I've decided to remove the shok buff while I carry my 1911. I would install them back though when going to the shooting range to practice.

Thanks again,
556man



Sounds like a solid decision.
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 8:59:59 PM EST

Originally Posted By Winston_Wolf:
... No

... John Moses Browning didn't think he needed one either






Amen Brother!!!
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 11:25:19 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/14/2005 11:26:10 PM EST by SGB]
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 11:33:28 PM EST

Originally Posted By SGB:
while exended safeties, beavertails, sights and mag funnels may make the weapon user friendlier to some people they don't affect the functioning of the weapon as SHOCK BUFFS can and often do.
.



hmmmm, good point.

I think thats the first time anyone has said that my post was a load of crap
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 11:44:37 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/14/2005 11:52:15 PM EST by svi40]


Thought I might add, I love JMB's original as much as anyone.


Link Posted: 3/15/2005 6:09:07 AM EST
I've got a shock buff in mine.
Link Posted: 3/15/2005 6:20:31 AM EST
My Wilson CQB came from the factory with a Shock Buffer, but I removed it ASAP. I have zero use for Shock Buffers.
Link Posted: 3/15/2005 6:36:52 AM EST
I've heard too many horror stories about Shock Buffs. I don't see the need for one, myself.
Link Posted: 3/15/2005 7:41:58 AM EST
<---doesn't use shok-buffs.

If I have to replace a gun at 100K rounds, so be it.
Link Posted: 3/15/2005 7:46:45 AM EST
My CQB also came with one and I change it and the recoil spring every 5000 rounds. Never had a failure. YMMV
Link Posted: 3/15/2005 7:57:44 AM EST

Originally Posted By 556man:
I know the shok buff are supposed to protect the slide and frame from slamming with each other but would the shok buff affect reliability? Would you install a shok buff on your carry piece?

Thank you for your input and advice,
556man



Usually they dont affect reliability, however, I remove mine before carrying. I feel that by removing it you are getting a slight edge with reliability. It does slightly affect timing as your slide it not traveling as far back. Why take the chance and leave it in if your lifes at stake?
Link Posted: 3/15/2005 8:13:05 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/15/2005 8:13:51 AM EST by AJohnston]
With diligence and care a shok-buff won’t be a problem in most 5” 1911s. One just has to remember to use a good quality buff and change it when it’s worn. I have a few 1911s from a custom maker that came with buffs in them and when I shoot those guns I leave the buffs in just as the guns left the builders shop. But other than that I don’t mess with buffs and never use them in my carry gun.

Some say a shok-buff will help save your frame and extend its life. I don’t necessarily agree and think the jury is still out on the ability of a shok-buff to prevent any wear to ones frame. I have one gun in particular that has never had a shok-buff installed and now has over 30,000 rounds through it. The frame and slide on that gun show no perceivable ill effects... the key to longevity is simply proper maintenance and regular spring changes.

What I can say for sure is that a shok-buff will make the gun shoot “softer”. That is they lighten the feel and recoil impulse as the slide reaches its rearward most point of travel. Other than that I can’t say for sure that they do much at all except take up space in the gun.
Link Posted: 3/15/2005 8:21:34 AM EST
One thing to consider about shock buffers in general, and particular those in handguns: the reason they're not really needed is because nature provides a shock buffer: your hand. When you fire a handgun, the energy of the slide is transmitted through the frame and grips and into your hand. And 99% of the time, your hand absorbs the energy just fine. (HEAVY MAGNUMS EXCEPTED.)

Some people picture the slamming of the slide into the frame as if the frame is locked in a vise. If you do lock a pistol in a vice, and continually fire lots of rounds through it, then the frame will take a beating. But your hand acts as a natural shock absorber for the energy of the slide.

Another way of looking at it: Think of the slide as a hammer, and the frame as a nail. If you try to pound the nail into a piece of wood (the hand), the nail doesn't suffer too much damage because the wood absorbs the energy. If you try to pound the nail into a piece of concrete (a vice), chances are the the nail will look like a flattened pretzel, because the concrete won't give, and the nail soaks all the energy up as it deforms.

Summary: Unless the frame or the design are defective, you don't need a shock buff. If you still want to use one, it's a free country.

Just my $.02. Hope this helps.
Link Posted: 3/15/2005 10:03:03 AM EST
Appreciate your very informative input. Thanks again to everybody.

556man
Link Posted: 3/15/2005 12:29:40 PM EST

Originally Posted By svi40:


I think thats the first time anyone has said that my post was a load of crap

but not the 1st time someone has thought it



Link Posted: 3/15/2005 1:27:34 PM EST
On shock buffers, there is one thing to watch, and that is thickness.

Depending on the amount that the slide moves back past the slide catch will dictate the buffer needed. The Wilson combat buffers are thinner than the MGW onces.

Bottom line is make sure that with the buffer installed, and the slide locked back, the catch will release when you pull the side back to release the slide.

As for needing a buffer, recoil spring the pistol correctly for the load at hand, and they are a border line waste in a steel frame pistol.
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