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Posted: 9/16/2009 8:26:00 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/16/2009 8:26:23 AM EST by WarriorSoulM4]
I've got an old S&W Victory model that needs to be refinished,and I can't figure out how to remove the cylinder from the frame.
Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 8:38:23 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/16/2009 8:38:55 AM EST by machinisttx]
You do realize that value will go down if you refinish it, right?

The sideplate screw that is closest to the muzzle, above the trigger, is what retains the yoke and cylinder.

ETA: Does this "Victory model" have USMC or US Navy stamps on it?
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 9:15:18 AM EST
ALL STOP! Price on Victory Models has gone up in recent years. Especially Navy marked.

If you want something nicer, sell the Victory and by a Model 10. Unless its a complete rust bucket, refinishing is a bad idea.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 10:38:51 AM EST
Speaking just to disassembly, to remove the cylinder remove the screw on the right front of the frame, just above the trigger.
KEEP THIS SCREW SEPARATE FROM ALL OTHERS, ITS A FITTED SCREW AND MUST GO BACK IN THE SAME HOLE.
The lower side plate screw looks just like it but isn't. Don't get them switched.

With the screw out, open the cylinder and slide the entire cylinder and yoke assembly forward and off the frame.

WARNING: The older S&W cylinder assembly disassembles differently than newer versions.
Put 3 EMPTY cases in the cylinder to prevent damaging the ejector assembly.
Put the end of the ejector rod in a well padded vise and unscrew the rod.
NOTE: Newer S&W's have LEFT hand threads. Older versions have RIGHT hand. Turn it the right way.

To remove the side plate, remove the screws and use a screwdriver handle to rap the grip frame just below the side plate. This will vibrate the plate off. DO NOT pry it.
Link Posted: 9/19/2009 7:43:30 AM EST
Originally Posted By machinisttx:
You do realize that value will go down if you refinish it, right?

The sideplate screw that is closest to the muzzle, above the trigger, is what retains the yoke and cylinder.

ETA: Does this "Victory model" have USMC or US Navy stamps on it?


It is not stamped at all, other than the S & W and the patent and caliber info on the barrel, but since the serial number is V123**, and it is in all places it should be, I was told on another forum that it is in fact an early model of the "Victory" series. It was found four miles deep in some hills, fully loaded and rusted tight, about five years ago, and I've been trying to restore it a little at a time. The grips look to have been switched, I inadvertently scrubed them with a copper brush and ruined the serial numbers, since the whole thing was soaking in kerosene for a pretty good while to loosen the rust, they looked like black plastic, turned out to be walnut. I've got it working pretty good, fires well and functions properly. The issue I have is that there is some rust built up in the cylinders, and when it is fired, some of the cases get stuck from the expansion, I was going to put some naval jelly in there, and then re-blue it. It is kind of ugly, I'll try and post some pics later. And since I don't know too much about revolvers, I couldnt figure out how to remove the cylinder, If I could get it off so I can do some work on the chambers without having to use the jelly I'll try that first. Any additional help would be appreciated.
Link Posted: 9/19/2009 9:58:14 AM EST
That condition, go ahead and restore it to a shooter. By the way, the handguns were parkerized from the factory. You might want to consider something like NP3 to finish it. But whatever you do, your going to have to strip it completly down. Find a book or go on line and search for directions.
Link Posted: 9/19/2009 4:34:11 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/19/2009 4:34:54 PM EST by machinisttx]
Originally Posted By WarriorSoulM4:
Originally Posted By machinisttx:
You do realize that value will go down if you refinish it, right?

The sideplate screw that is closest to the muzzle, above the trigger, is what retains the yoke and cylinder.

ETA: Does this "Victory model" have USMC or US Navy stamps on it?


It is not stamped at all, other than the S & W and the patent and caliber info on the barrel, but since the serial number is V123**, and it is in all places it should be, I was told on another forum that it is in fact an early model of the "Victory" series. It was found four miles deep in some hills, fully loaded and rusted tight, about five years ago, and I've been trying to restore it a little at a time. The grips look to have been switched, I inadvertently scrubed them with a copper brush and ruined the serial numbers, since the whole thing was soaking in kerosene for a pretty good while to loosen the rust, they looked like black plastic, turned out to be walnut. I've got it working pretty good, fires well and functions properly. The issue I have is that there is some rust built up in the cylinders, and when it is fired, some of the cases get stuck from the expansion, I was going to put some naval jelly in there, and then re-blue it. It is kind of ugly, I'll try and post some pics later. And since I don't know too much about revolvers, I couldnt figure out how to remove the cylinder, If I could get it off so I can do some work on the chambers without having to use the jelly I'll try that first. Any additional help would be appreciated.


Does it have the "flaming bomb" ordnance department stamp?

I suggest heading over to http://smith-wessonforum.com/forum.php for more information on that gun. If it does not have ordnance dept stamps, it probably went to DSC and not the military.

ETA: Pick up a copy of "The S&W Shop Manual" from brownells,midway, etc.
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