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Posted: 9/17/2004 4:41:25 PM EST
Gents-

Was wondering if anyone on here owned one of these? I'm looking for a new .45acp pistol and I've got in the consideration a Springfield Armory 1911 loaded (would really like a TRP, but thats out of the price range) and a CZ97. I was able to shoot a loaner CZ97 at the range I belong to and was rather surprised by its accuracy and fit in my hand and came away being rather impressed with the pistol. However, I was kinda puzzled by the DA trigger on it with no decocker, but I guess thats neither here nor there. But, was looking for any feed back on these that people can give me as to reliablity, easy of maintence, any problems that people have had with them or general thoughts and feedback. Thanks in advance,

Lithgow303

Link Posted: 9/18/2004 6:49:00 AM EST
I'd definitely want a CZ97 if I could afford one now. It's on my list.

I have heard they are crazy accurate and very reliable. I think they're only a slight bit wider than a 1911.

The trigger/safety setup, I believe, is identical to the 75B series. DA/SA with a safety, not a decocker. You can carry cocked and locked like a 1911, or hammer down like a Beretta.

I don't own one, but I can say, if you want one, you probably won't be disappointed.
Link Posted: 9/18/2004 7:26:21 PM EST
I like mine. It is accurate, reliable (no misfeeds or FTFs or FTEs to date, none, zero, zip), and the forward weight from the dustcover minimizes muzzle flip. Consequently it is great for activities like plate shooting.

There are some downsides. It is very heavy, so it is not an ideal carry pistol (unless you want to carry openly). It is also large (I had a holster custom made for it). It is also grip-fat: find a Glock 21, hold it in your hand (remembering that it was designed to hold 13 rounds of .45 ACP), and realize that the grip on the 97B feels bigger (even though it holds 10 rounds). IPSC and IDPA shooters like the pistol, but I’ve heard tell that they would like to have the grip slimmed a bit.

I believe that the grip is actually slimmer than the big Glock frames, but it doesn’t feel that way to me.

Magazines are not made by CZ, but by Mec-Gar, and are high quality. The magazine brake can be swapped out for a drop-free version in about 5 minutes. (Some people just pull out the brake altogether, but that is not recommended.)

The pistol has a rather strange barrel bushing that screws into the front of the slide. Gun Tests reports that they inadvertently messed up the bushing by not properly aligning it after takedown, but that damage did not affect accuracy.

Sometimes I think about selling mine, because I would rather spend my precious shooting time practicing with carry weapons; however, not yet.

The 97B is definitely a big brother to the 75B, and some parts are interchangeable. “Decocking” is done with the familiar three-handed procedure (a finger from one hand pulls the trigger, the thumb and index finger of the second hand pinch the hammer to prevent it from striking the firing pin with too much force, and the thumb of the third hand lies between the hammer and the pin in case the other fingers fail, the fourth hand makes the sign of the cross while you pray you don’t screw up).

That’s all I can think of.
Link Posted: 9/19/2004 5:12:24 AM EST
thanks for the input there. If you had to do it all over again would you go CZ or Springfield Loaded?
Lithgow303
Link Posted: 9/19/2004 5:39:11 AM EST
Are you asking me?
Link Posted: 9/19/2004 8:54:16 AM EST
yep. Those are my two choices in the price range at the moment. Thanks,
Lithgow303
Link Posted: 9/19/2004 10:36:29 AM EST
Like all things in this world, it depends.

IMHO, the CZ 97B is a very good pistol, but limited in its applications due to size, weight, grip, etc. The factory mags will cost you $30.00 apiece, or more ($30.00 from J&G, plus shipping). Of course, if you buy Wilson-Rogers magazines for 1911s (highly recommended by many shooters), you will pay a similar price. Also, because the CZ comes in a SA/DA configuration, the SA trigger will never be as crisp as a good quality 1911.

(NOTE: A reputable gunsmith once told me he could make a CZ trigger comparable to an average 1911. He practiced on my CZ 75B. After several tries, he gave up and ate all the parts and labor bills to get my CZ to factory spec. As it didn’t cost me a cent, I didn’t mind, but learned a lesson in the process.)

The Springfields have a terrific reputation, especially those that come from the custom shop (more on this in a moment). The stock pistols are very good. Several friends of mine own them and swear by them. It’s a real pity that a fine firearm made in Massachusetts may not be sold here under current law (it’s considered “unsafe” by the damned Attorney General – don’t get me started). The “loaded” package is a good competitor with the Kimbers and other good medium-grade pistols (i.e., $600-$1000); they shoot well right out of the box.

If you want to upgrade a Springfield, you have the option of sending it to their custom shop for tuning, even if you purchased the pistol years before.

To wind up my long-winded spiel: If you have a good 1911 already (e.g., Kimber, Colt, Springfield, Wilson, Rock River, even one of the new Smith & Wessons or the newer Sigs), then consider buying the CZ; it should cost no more than $500 new. (I bought mine in 1998 for $400.) If you do not have a good quality 1911, buy the Springfield.

As for me, I purchased a good Kimber before I bought the CZ

If you want a 10 round .45 ACP, then you might also consider a Para Ord. I have no experience with these.

I hope this helps.
Link Posted: 9/19/2004 11:09:12 AM EST
Thanks on that!
Lithgow303

Link Posted: 9/21/2004 8:47:06 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 12:55:21 PM EST
So what's the trick with drop-free mags?


There's a factory magazine brake that replaces the standard brake and allows the magazines to drop free. Essentially, it is flat instead of convex (i.e., it does not rub up against the mag body to prevent it dropping out). Some people remove theirs completely to achieve the same result, but the magaziine can jam into the frame during a fast magazine change. The factory folks say that much more dire results can result, but I am unconvinced of those predictions.

Anyway, the part costs about $3.40 + $7.00 shipping from CZ USA. If you like, I can check to see if I have any extras. I once ordered a bunch from CZ USA because people are always interested in this option. If I have any left, I will sell one for $4.50 (my actual cost).

Let me know and I'll investigate the parts closet.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 8:41:34 AM EST
You can also flatten the mag brake so the mags will fall freely, but just be careful as you can break the mag break if your not careful.
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 2:37:51 PM EST

Originally Posted By Jfor:
You can also flatten the mag brake so the mags will fall freely, but just be careful as you can break the mag break if your not careful.



This might be a bit difficult with the mag break on the CZ 97B as it's quite long and has a natural tendency to rub against the back of the mag. One would probably be better getting one of the factory drop free breaks.

--
Mike
Link Posted: 10/2/2004 7:10:48 PM EST
I had a cz 97 I hated it It would not shoot a full mag of hollow points If you loaded all ten rounds the first three rounds would nose dive every time In several mags. I sent it back to cz and 4 months later i got it back with no problem found so I shoot it and again it did the same thing so i sent it back again and six months later i got it back with a new recoil spring and guide rod. Still did the same thing so I sold that peice of shit to the first sucker I could find. If you want a good 45 acp. try a glock I have one and i love it. I have never had the first problem s&w makes a good 45 and sig also
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 1:40:22 PM EST

Originally Posted By gunhussler:
I had a cz 97 I hated it It would not shoot a full mag of hollow points If you loaded all ten rounds the first three rounds would nose dive every time In several mags. I sent it back to cz and 4 months later i got it back with no problem found so I shoot it and again it did the same thing so i sent it back again and six months later i got it back with a new recoil spring and guide rod. Still did the same thing so I sold that peice of shit to the first sucker I could find.



Well, there were a couple of steps you could have taken:
1) It's not unheard of to have the mag springs installed backwards. This has been seen in a couple of CZ 97 mags. I believe the majority of this situation has been in the aftermarket mags.
2) Weak mag springs, again, mainly in aftermartket mags.
3) It's possible that the front of the feedlips were just a bit too close, causing the follower to bind.
4) Edges needing cleaned up a bit on the slide stop, usually indicated by copper traces (when shooting ball) on the stop.

As to the glock, I'd pass.

--
Mike
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 10:29:01 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/6/2004 10:06:46 AM EST
The 97 is a calibre expanded version of the 75 or 85. These have the same takedown and cleaning steps as the Browning HP and 1911 so when you break it down it is A John Browning design expanded for higher capacity. John Browning designs are known for their reliability many are the basis for guns currently being produced today. Buy it!!!!!!!!! Also what is the max capacity????
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 1:22:47 PM EST
I took my CZ 97B to the range today. It's just too easy to leave a small, ragged hole in the target with this gun. Put about 200 rounds down range without issue. Mostly ball, but some JHP reloads and Silvertips.

With something this accurate, you just wish it was a tad bit smaller.

--
Mike
Link Posted: 10/10/2004 7:17:12 PM EST
No problem with mine using hollow points. Big, powerful gun. Love it.
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