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Posted: 3/9/2005 11:49:23 AM EST
Im thinking about purchasing 1911 as my CCW. My question is, those of you who carry one, does the grip safety ever seem to be a hinderance? I ask because it would almost seem like a hinderance. (Id prefer not to draw the weapon and hear just a click because my grip on the weapon isnt exactly perfect but still safe to fire) In a stressful situation I would prefer to have a Glock style trigger safety or none at all. Are there any knockoff variants of the Colt that dont have this feature? I would prefer not to have safety mechanisms in my way when I might have to depend on the weapon most.
Link Posted: 3/9/2005 12:38:14 PM EST

Originally Posted By bloodsport2885:
Im thinking about purchasing 1911 as my CCW. My question is, those of you who carry one, does the grip safety ever seem to be a hinderance?



No, it has never been an issue, not even once. The only way I COULD see it ever being an issue is if you use a high-ride thumb grip with your thumb riding the safety, which could take your palm off the grip safety. But as I said, I have never once experienced any problem with it in 20 years of shooting 1911s.
Link Posted: 3/9/2005 1:11:14 PM EST
Link Posted: 3/9/2005 1:16:22 PM EST
Nope, no problem at all. I actually like having a grip safety, as evidenced by the fact that I haven't pinned mine.
Link Posted: 3/9/2005 1:26:53 PM EST
and only carry condition ONE!! period
Link Posted: 3/9/2005 2:01:46 PM EST
First thing, if you don't have the gs pressed, you will not even hear a click. You can not pull the trigger until the GS is pressed. It has never been a problem in all the years and all the 1911's I have carried. To me, it makes is safer to carry in condition 1. And if you do have a problem, there are GS with and extra pad to make sure you get it pressed.
Link Posted: 3/9/2005 6:44:42 PM EST
Not to mention that having the grip saftey is an added saftey feature if the thumb saftey accidentally gets knocked to the off position
Link Posted: 3/9/2005 7:54:15 PM EST
To be the usual fly in the ointment, yes, the grip safety on the 1911 can be a real problem. In fact, it is such a problem that modifications to the grip safety are one of the most common alterations to the gun. Many shooters have trouble getting the grip safety properly depressed, or having it bite them when they fire. The problem is easy to fix, but it can be problem.
Link Posted: 3/9/2005 8:55:44 PM EST
Sorry, but a 1911 is not a good choice for a novice CCW. Or a seasoned CCWer without experience with a 1911. I would not suggest a 1911 for CCW to anyone who hasn't put at least a few thousand rounds through one. By all means, buy a 1911 (no shooter should be without one or ten) but don't carry it until you have a few thousand rounds on the platform. I don't consider the 1911 to be a "rookie's" gun, not with condition one, the various safeties and general "manual of arms" for it. But it is best choice for a "combat" or "self defense" handgun.

But hey, that's just my opinion, which is exactly worth what you paid for it...
Link Posted: 3/10/2005 2:12:44 AM EST
I never understand why people say a new CCW'er should not carry a 1911 due to the condition one, then suggest a Glock. With a Glock, all you have to do is put pressure on that trigger. Add stress in a life and death situation, that pressure could easily be applied coming out of the holster. At least with a 1911 you have the grip safety and the thumb safety. Reguardless of what you carry, you should have a lot of practice with it.
Link Posted: 3/10/2005 4:41:28 AM EST
I've never had a problem whether wearing gloves or bare hands with the stock grip safety. There are grip safeties with memory bumps that would make it almost impossible NOT to depress them.
Link Posted: 3/10/2005 6:15:53 AM EST
I can see the point of many of you in that, since its my first CCW it should be something simpler to use (ive looked at everything from Glocks to Sigs to S&W). I Still havnt made up my mind as far as even getting an auto or buying a revolver. Im leaning toward revolver based on its reliability and simplicity, but my sighting with an auto (esp those with longer barrels like a full sized 1911) is far superior. One last question....what is condition 1?
Link Posted: 3/10/2005 6:37:47 AM EST

Originally Posted By bloodsport2885:
One last question....what is condition 1?



Condition one is loaded chamber, hammer cocked and the thumb safety engaged. You grip the pistol (disengages the grip safety) sweep the thumb safety off and you are ready to fire. 1911's have crisp, single action triggers, with little or no take-up. Some people get really nervous carrying in condition one (also called "cocked and locked") which is the ONLY way to carry a 1911.
Link Posted: 3/10/2005 9:41:36 PM EST

Originally Posted By bloodsport2885:
I can see the point of many of you in that, since its my first CCW it should be something simpler to use (ive looked at everything from Glocks to Sigs to S&W). I Still havnt made up my mind as far as even getting an auto or buying a revolver. Im leaning toward revolver based on its reliability and simplicity, but my sighting with an auto (esp those with longer barrels like a full sized 1911) is far superior. One last question....what is condition 1?



Don't get a revolver. Slow to reload and more difficult to hit with. There are a number of autos that fire just as easily and are much more usefull.
Link Posted: 3/11/2005 10:50:39 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/11/2005 10:50:57 AM EST by sahicap]
Not really my opinion but they say not to carry a 1911 as a rookie because of its complexity, not because of safety while in the holster. A glock doesn't have the safeties which can be bad if you can't keep your finger away from the trigger. But I thinkt he issue with the glock for newbies is that it is a draw and fire weapon where the 1911 requires draw, saftey off and depress gs (which I have never had a problem with). If you are new to the world of 1911's it may not be easy for you to do all of those things under stress and may be better off with a glock.


I have heard guys who ipsc with there 1911's say they had to pin theirs.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 2:50:41 PM EST
I carry a glock, but that is because I don't carry spare mags. If I were willing to carry extra mags I would carry a 1911, cocked and locked, with a working grip safety. Probably an officers model because that standard 1911 is a little on the long side. It doesn't make sense to me to disconnect any safety device on a ccw.
Link Posted: 3/13/2005 5:12:44 PM EST
While they may not bother some people, I can't imagine why anyone would really like a grip safety.
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 4:41:58 PM EST

Originally Posted By triburst1:
While they may not bother some people, I can't imagine why anyone would really like a grip safety.



I can't imagine why it would bother anyone... It's operation is totally transparent. Grap the gun safety off. Let go of gun safety on. What could be more simple?

Kent
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 7:15:26 PM EST
I can see how it would be a good safety measure esp for a CCW. Ill reconsider when I go to the shop to actually purchase one. I havnt ever held a 1911 so Ill just have to try out the GS and see for myself.
Link Posted: 3/15/2005 4:11:49 AM EST

Originally Posted By bloodsport2885:
I can see how it would be a good safety measure esp for a CCW. Ill reconsider when I go to the shop to actually purchase one. I havnt ever held a 1911 so Ill just have to try out the GS and see for myself.



Go hold one and all will become clear. There's no click as it engages and disengages. You'll never even know its there when you handle it.

It also has the advantage that it is a customizable part. I find a military grip safety will cause the hammer to bite me occasionaly. I've found great comfort with the Wilson beavertail on my 1911.

Kent
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