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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 11/7/2012 9:26:34 AM EST
Getting my first CCW pistol Friday and just wanting to know it all before purchasing. I plan to get it from Academy Sports store and I want to ask them if they can pull different pistols out from the same type to let me inspect them to get the best one (just looking at the outside finish and plastic molding). I was thinking while doing this (if they will even let me) should I dry fire the gun to tell if the trigger pull is too much? I've heard from the factory they can be different even if it's the same gun.
Link Posted: 11/7/2012 9:40:00 AM EST
Yes, trigger pull can vary from one gun to the next. Typically not by a lot, but some differences do crop up. Whether the shop will let you play with everything in their inventory is another matter. Anything on display you should be fine. But pulling stuff out of the back room, I have my doubts. At least around here, shops don't usually have much in the back. If its in the shop its on display.
Link Posted: 11/7/2012 9:59:23 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 9:23:35 AM EST
Don't forget to hold the trigger back after dry firing and rack the slide to test the trigger reset. This varies alot from gun to gun and can affect the way it shoots.
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 9:39:02 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/8/2012 9:39:20 AM EST by FP2000H]
They have never let me dry fire a pistol. I think their policy is that the trigger lock stays on the gun.

eta: which pistol you looking at?
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 9:47:44 AM EST
Would someone who has little experience pulling triggers notice anything but a dramatic difference?
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 9:54:19 AM EST
Originally Posted By FP2000H:
They have never let me dry fire a pistol. I think their policy is that the trigger lock stays on the gun.

eta: which pistol you looking at?


M&P40c
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 10:07:03 AM EST
Originally Posted By Stopsign:
Originally Posted By FP2000H:
They have never let me dry fire a pistol. I think their policy is that the trigger lock stays on the gun.

eta: which pistol you looking at?


M&P40c


M&P series and Glocks are as good a pistol as you can purchase at Academy. I've no experience with the Walther PPQ line (don't even know if Academy carries them), but I hear good things about them. I've shot both Glocks and M&Ps and the triggers are acceptable and you're getting a quality weapon in either case. I can't say I've ever recommended Taurus or Para Ordnance and I'm not about to start today.
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 10:23:35 AM EST
Originally Posted By FP2000H:
Originally Posted By Stopsign:
Originally Posted By FP2000H:
They have never let me dry fire a pistol. I think their policy is that the trigger lock stays on the gun.

eta: which pistol you looking at?


M&P40c


M&P series and Glocks are as good a pistol as you can purchase at Academy. I've no experience with the Walther PPQ line (don't even know if Academy carries them), but I hear good things about them. I've shot both Glocks and M&Ps and the triggers are acceptable and you're getting a quality weapon in either case. I can't say I've ever recommended Taurus or Para Ordnance and I'm not about to start today.


My local academy has a PPQ and I was seriously thinking about it. However after seeing it in person and holding it..that's a BIG gun to be CCWing
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 10:38:48 AM EST
The PPQ is a great pistol with a light smooth trigger pull and very short reset. Seems a bit big to CCW though. I wouldn't know bc I live in commie-IL state.
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 10:48:23 AM EST
I got the G26 because I thought I wouldn't be able to conceal anything larger.

Recently I sold it and got a G19 and am now thinking that I could have got a G17.
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 11:39:10 AM EST
Originally Posted By joker1:
Don't forget to hold the trigger back after dry firing and rack the slide to test the trigger reset. This varies alot from gun to gun and can affect the way it shoots.


The reset...affects....the...way...it...shoots....

Where do you people get this stuff from? The reset happens AFTER the DAMNED gun goes off....

To the OP:

If you do not know what you are looking for do not try and look for something.

Simply buy a gun renowned for durability and reliability and learn to shoot it. As you develop your skill your understanding of trigger characteristics will broaden and you can work on changing your individual guns trigger to better suit your needs.
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 11:50:31 AM EST
Originally Posted By Magsz18:
Originally Posted By joker1:
Don't forget to hold the trigger back after dry firing and rack the slide to test the trigger reset. This varies alot from gun to gun and can affect the way it shoots.


The reset...affects....the...way...it...shoots....

Where do you people get this stuff from? The reset happens AFTER the DAMNED gun goes off....

To the OP:

If you do not know what you are looking for do not try and look for something.

Simply buy a gun renowned for durability and reliability and learn to shoot it. As you develop your skill your understanding of trigger characteristics will broaden and you can work on changing your individual guns trigger to better suit your needs.


Reset is irrelevant only on the first shot. A good reset helps follow up shots.
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 12:41:06 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/8/2012 12:44:00 PM EST by Magsz18]
Originally Posted By undone11091:
Originally Posted By Magsz18:
Originally Posted By joker1:
Don't forget to hold the trigger back after dry firing and rack the slide to test the trigger reset. This varies alot from gun to gun and can affect the way it shoots.


The reset...affects....the...way...it...shoots....

Where do you people get this stuff from? The reset happens AFTER the DAMNED gun goes off....

To the OP:

If you do not know what you are looking for do not try and look for something.

Simply buy a gun renowned for durability and reliability and learn to shoot it. As you develop your skill your understanding of trigger characteristics will broaden and you can work on changing your individual guns trigger to better suit your needs.


Reset is irrelevant only on the first shot. A good reset helps follow up shots.


Reset is irrelevant on ALL shots when shooting at speed. I really wish this would die a horrific death.

Reset is used to teach new shooters proper follow through. Once that concept is ingrained, reset is no longer necessary for much of anything and can actually lead to other issues such as trigger pushing, hesitation, short stroking etc etc.

EDIT: I will concede that a SHORTER reset can help most shooters shoot at a quicker pace but it is NOT a characteristic i put too much thought into.
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 4:36:39 PM EST
what store lets you dry fire?

they have a fucking caniption if you put your finger on the trigger.
Link Posted: 11/11/2012 5:35:23 AM EST
Hold each gun in your hand and rack the slide. I say this because depending on how you hold/grip the pistol,you can see if it will contact the webbing of your hand. For example, I can't shoot Glocks without altering my grip because the small tang,(the part of the gun that sits in the webbing of your hand), because I will get slide bite. It could also cause the gun to not cycle normally. I like the S&W M&Pc for that reason. I can have a high grip and not have to worry about slide bite because the tang is a little longer,but not that much to hinder good control,concealment or feel. You also have the option of a thumb safety,like a 1911 pistol. Not everyone likes it,but at least they have an option. The trigger is smooth,much like the Glock. Don't get me wrong, I love Glocks and have one, but if I don't pay attention to the little things,range day can be a pretty bloody/painful experience.

As far as the PPQ, the pistol is pretty large for ccw, well, at least for my taste. Trigger pull is great and gun functions nicely,like a Walther always does,but like I said,it is large for carry. Recoil is about the same for the Glock and M&P, with the edge going to the M&P, in my opinion.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 11:44:03 AM EST
Yes.

Link Posted: 11/22/2012 12:05:33 PM EST
Generally, dry-firing can be helpful, but not always. My CZ-SP01 had a pretty average feeling trigger in dry fire, but I could shoot better 25 yard groups with it than almost any other gun I've owned or shot.
Link Posted: 11/23/2012 2:36:17 AM EST
Being able to test the trigger is / has been helpful to me, though not necessarily critical. In my limited experience, new Glock triggers can vary by quite a bit, though the heavier ones will often smooth out / lightent up with use. I've also found a few 1911's with exceptionally heavy trigger pulls by dry firing. I have no experience with m&p's.

If a shop won't let me respectully and properly manipulate a pistol / firearm, I just won't buy from them. It doesn't make me angry, a shop is entitled to its policies, but I appreciate a very limited "test drive."

I find that most shops / gun show vendors will let you manipulate the slide, dry fire, etc. as long as you're respectful and don't act like an idiot about it.
Link Posted: 11/23/2012 3:19:34 AM EST
if this is your first CCW gun, I don't think you'll know much about what you are looking for in a trigger pull, to be honest with you.

The M&P40C is a fine CCW pistol. There isn't much of a variance between one trigger pull and another in these, but the variances do exist. However, most will break in just fine.
Link Posted: 11/23/2012 3:23:29 AM EST
Originally Posted By AngeredKabar:
Would someone who has little experience pulling triggers notice anything but a dramatic difference?


No. Honestly, it takes a lot of trigger pulls on a lot of different guns to be able to discern anything but drastic differences.
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