Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Posted: 7/17/2008 7:15:02 AM EDT
Regarding the M9, how common is the trigger return spring failure and do most folks thing the Wolff Gun Spring upgrade is worth the money?

TIA
Steve
Link Posted: 7/17/2008 7:41:07 AM EDT
Never seen a broken one. Most of them jump out and get lost when someone uses a brush or pushes a rag into the frame to clean it. Stock parts are fine. Get two of whatever you feel you need as they do disappear when you clean the wrong way.
Link Posted: 7/17/2008 7:44:36 AM EDT
The more you shoot it, the more likely it is to break. After breaking three of them in my Italian Inox, I installed the Wolff INS trigger unit and have had zero problems. I actually prefer the trigger pull over the factory spring as well. Beretta should equip their pistols with these units from the factory.
Link Posted: 7/17/2008 10:47:16 AM EDT
Beretta said the trigger return spring was good for an average of 100,000 pulls.....but like anything made by man, it could fail. Out of several thousand in-service pistols, I would see only 5-6 a year, just can't predict when it may fail.

Have an extra spring on hand and replace as needed.

If it breaks in a gunfight, manually press the trigger forward to reset after every shot.
Link Posted: 7/17/2008 1:22:08 PM EDT
The nice thing about the Wolff setup is that it more or less eliminates the spring breakage issue. The Beretta is capable of being manually reset to fire by pushing the trigger forward in the event that the spring should break. However, as is commonly taught, when the SHTF, fine motor skills become impaired. I would prefer to eliminate that possibility before it happens.
Link Posted: 7/17/2008 6:49:58 PM EDT
I own two 92s & the first thing I did to both is replace the return spring with the Wolf unit. Awfully cheap insurance for a FUBAR, IMO.................
Link Posted: 7/17/2008 9:40:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/17/2008 9:40:11 PM EDT by Jeeper21]
I replaced mine with the wolf unit also. But in retrospect, I would recommend you get the extra (or normal) powered spring.

I got the reduced power one and sometimes the tigger doesn't reset properly when firing and I have to consciously extend my finger to allow it to spring back. The higher powered one would probably not have this problem.
Link Posted: 7/17/2008 10:14:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/17/2008 10:14:43 PM EDT by Lumpy196]
The trigger spring breaking is a well documented failure-point in the Beretta, and thus the reason INS had Wolff develop a new spring assembly.


Happened in BOTH the 92F and 92FS I owned years ago.
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 4:17:20 AM EDT
I have a Wolff in my "high-use" 92FS and have not had any problems. I went with the standard spring one, and it didn't change the feel of the trigger at all (which is the result I wanted).

You need a steel trigger for it to work. It won't work with the plastic ones.

I'd just get the Wolff unit and never look back.
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 8:12:42 AM EDT
Thanks for the responses gentlemen, very helpful. Anyone have a source for steel triggers?

Steve
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 8:25:35 AM EDT
You should be able to get a steel trigger directly through the Beretta USA website ot through Dave Olhasso's Beretta website as well.
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 10:00:36 AM EDT
How long have those Wolff units been out? Anyone have a serious round count with one?
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 10:50:25 AM EDT
Tomislav, at this point I only have about 2000 on my trigger unit, but I have much more use with dry fire use. The basic design of the unit is somewhat similar to the trigger spring function on 3rd Gen S&W autos. I have never heard or seen one those types of trigger springs fail.
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 2:22:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Tomislav:
How long have those Wolff units been out? Anyone have a serious round count with one?




They've been out for years. I probably have 2k+ rds on my IPSC 92FS with it. I bought it used so there's no telling how many rds were fired before *I* got it.
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 2:37:30 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 2:40:47 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 7:44:15 PM EDT
Well this is good to know. I've never had a return spring break on me, but I've read enough stories about that one of these Wolff units sounds like the ticket...
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 8:11:51 PM EDT
I have an 18 year old Beretta 92FS with the original spring. Many, many, many thousands of rounds have gone down range. If you listen to some people, shoot a Beretta and parts fly off!
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 7:36:48 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Steve_in_PA:

I have an 18 year old Beretta 92FS with the original spring.



Just proving that there's always an exception to the rule, sir.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 2:30:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/19/2008 2:31:54 PM EDT by rparrish]
Steve_in_PA, my Beretta 92FS Inox is 18 years old as well, but I had three trigger return springs break in that amount of time. Perhaps yours has fewer rounds through or maybe the spring in yours is a better spring. The first spring lasted for about 10 years before it broke and the last two didn't make it even close to that. I'm not bagging on the Beretta at all, I am simply posting what I have seen. If you think the INS setup is a waste of money, that is your opinion. However, the fact remains that if the trigger spring does break when you need the pistol, you will have to manually push the trigger forward after every shot. Could you do that if you were being attacked? Perhaps some people could, but people typically react to how they train and I seriously doubt that many people practice the above mentioned method. I love the Beretta 92 design and I will never part with my Inox, but I think it is somewhat foolish not to consider an upgraded part for the pistol that will eliminate the possibility of a fairly serious malfunction. Also, what other parts have any of us here mentioned that "fly off the pistol"?
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 4:04:45 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 2:56:19 PM EDT
I never said the NIS spring was a waste of money. And I have thousands upon thousands of rounds through my Beretta. I merely said if you listen to some internet "experts" all kinds fo parts/springs break on a Beretta after firing a few magazines.

All springs can and will eventually wear out and/or break which is why a recoil spring should be changed somewhere around the 3-5k round mark. Changing the other springs is also a good idea. The last few years I admit I have not shot my Beretta as much as I used to, instead I'm shooting my Sig P-220 rather heavily. And because of this every other year I buy a kit from Sig ($25.00 +/-) and change all the springs; recoil, decocker, trigger bar return, etc.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 5:27:23 PM EDT

Originally Posted By John_Wayne777:

That's one of the gripes that the door kickers have about the Beretta. It needs a lot of time at the armorer's bench to keep it up and running.




Well, I'm not a "door kicker", but I DO have thousands of rds thru my 92FS IPSC gun w/o ANY trips to the 'smith for repair(s).

I replaced the trigger return spring as a precautionary step rather than a required step.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 7:34:17 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Steve_in_PA:
I never said the NIS spring was a waste of money. And I have thousands upon thousands of rounds through my Beretta. I merely said if you listen to some internet "experts" all kinds fo parts/springs break on a Beretta after firing a few magazines.

All springs can and will eventually wear out and/or break which is why a recoil spring should be changed somewhere around the 3-5k round mark. Changing the other springs is also a good idea. The last few years I admit I have not shot my Beretta as much as I used to, instead I'm shooting my Sig P-220 rather heavily. And because of this every other year I buy a kit from Sig ($25.00 +/-) and change all the springs; recoil, decocker, trigger bar return, etc.


There’s a difference between a spring wearing out and a spring breaking. A tired or worn out spring still does its job, just not as well as it should. Replacing a worn out spring at the ends of its life cycle as part of a normal maintenance routine is entirely acceptable.

However, when a spring breaks it actually stops performing its required function, with unpleasant if not down right fatal consequence. Replacing a breakage prone spring in the hope of catching it before it breaks is not addressing the real problem, since the replacement spring, by design, also has the potential to break. Replacing the factory spring, with its breakage prone extended legs, with a coil spring that operates under compression would appear to actually solve the problem.
Link Posted: 7/24/2008 6:31:48 AM EDT
Which of the Wolff INS TCUs is everyone using? Factory strength or reduced power?
Link Posted: 7/24/2008 9:20:24 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/24/2008 7:56:04 PM EDT by rparrish]
I am using the factory rated Wolff spring just to ensure proper trigger reset. I also installed a factory "D" hammer spring to lighten the trigger pull as well. No problems with this setup at all.
Link Posted: 7/24/2008 3:31:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SSeric02:
Which of the Wolff INS TCUs is everyone using? Factory strength or reduced power?



I used OEM rated with a DAO mainspring.

My .o2
Link Posted: 8/1/2008 6:53:01 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/1/2008 9:33:32 PM EDT
Which one? factory or Wolff?
Top Top