Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Posted: 7/6/2008 6:26:13 AM EDT
Im brand new to shooting handguns, and I suck. Ive been to the range 4 times with my new XD9. Im finally getting decent groupings, but they are off to the left about three inches (at 20 yrds). I shoot right handed, and I think this may be caused by a slight twist in the gun when I pull the trigger. I shoot my rifles with the 1st pad of my index finger, but Ive been told to shoot hand guns with the first crease. I havent had a chance to try both ways yet.... just happy Im finally getting groupings.
Link Posted: 7/6/2008 9:21:23 AM EDT
It is you...
Pad or crease ...It is what works for you.

Be slow and deliberate..Breath Aim squeeze

PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE

Dont have so much of a death grip on too
Link Posted: 7/6/2008 4:38:28 PM EDT
First thing is to use the PAD of your finger & NOT the joint to pull the trigger back.

Next, do a LOT of dry firing at home & watch the front sight while you pull the trigger. See if it goes left, down, whatever. Once you can have a perfect pull for 15-20 times in a row w/o the front sight wandering all over the place, then you should be good to go, IMO.

Good luck!
Link Posted: 7/6/2008 6:59:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/6/2008 7:09:43 PM EDT by Chacal87]

Originally Posted By ChuckBronson:
Im brand new to shooting handguns, and I suck. Ive been to the range 4 times with my new XD9. Im finally getting decent groupings, but they are off to the left about three inches (at 20 yrds). I shoot right handed, and I think this may be caused by a slight twist in the gun when I pull the trigger. I shoot my rifles with the 1st pad of my index finger, but Ive been told to shoot hand guns with the first crease. I havent had a chance to try both ways yet.... just happy Im finally getting groupings.


that would be my guess, is it low at all? What is more than likely happeing is 1 you are slapping the trigger 2. you might be flinching (everyone has done it) and 3 because of the flinch/trigger slap combo you are pushing the gun. When you push the gun it would go low and to the left (for a right handed shooter). It's hard to tell without actually watching you shoot. Obviously you are a fairly experienced shooter though if you came to the conclusing about the gun moving on the trigger pull by yourself. Do dryfire practice gripping high (springer precision has a great video for gripping the XD) and using THE PAD of your finger. Dryfire will transfer over to your live fire. The muscle memory from dry fire will help eliminate any flinch you might have developed and you will grip the gun correctly without even realizing it. Have fun shooting :)

ETA: Semiauto handguns can be weird to shoot at first. Also they require a break in period. Remember also to lean forward some. I shoot in a modified A frame type fashion with my body squared to the targer, knees slightly bent and shoulders over my knees. My head is low and my elbows are slightly bent. Look at pictures of professional shooters sometime and it will give you a good idea.
Link Posted: 7/6/2008 7:01:51 PM EDT
20 yards? Start at 10 get your hits where you want them. Then move back a little further.
Link Posted: 7/7/2008 10:07:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BobCole:
Next, do a LOT of dry firing at home & watch the front sight while you pull the trigger. See if it goes left, down, whatever. Once you can have a perfect pull for 15-20 times in a row w/o the front sight wandering all over the place, then you should be good to go, IMO.

Good luck!


I do this DAILY for competition. Good trigger control is a must. Once you think you have it down try it strong hand only and see where the sights go...still think you have it, do it weak hand. Want to be better than the 75% of the shooters, do it daily and watch your groups shrink.

When I go to the range I shoot at 25 yards if I can't do movement drills. That way I can watch my sites and know where the bullet will go on the target, its call calling your shot. With enough practice anybody can do it.
Link Posted: 7/7/2008 10:58:44 PM EDT
Thanks for the tips guys, I really appreciate it. I will start a dry firing "exercise routine" daily with both my handgun and my AR. Should I pin a target on the wall to help "see" sight movement? Or should I aim at an object that is the width of the front sight(at a distance of course)? Or just a bare wall? I will try all three of these when I wake up tomorrow today, and see what works. But Im wondering what I "should" be using.


Thanks again for all your help.
Link Posted: 7/8/2008 6:48:33 AM EDT
I use an IDPA style target outline on a piece of paper taped to the wall. I have also used a video that has targets that pop up at a beep and stay for an amount of time before reset.

For the AR, I use a small dot that is the size of a 300 meter 6MOA target, but sized for 10 feet.

-Corn
Link Posted: 7/8/2008 6:56:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ChuckBronson:
Thanks for the tips guys, I really appreciate it. I will start a dry firing "exercise routine" daily with both my handgun and my AR. Should I pin a target on the wall to help "see" sight movement? Or should I aim at an object that is the width of the front sight(at a distance of course)? Or just a bare wall?




I use it on my tv when I watch the news. Helps relieve stress...............
Link Posted: 7/8/2008 8:10:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ChuckBronson:
Thanks for the tips guys, I really appreciate it. I will start a dry firing "exercise routine" daily with both my handgun and my AR. Should I pin a target on the wall to help "see" sight movement? Or should I aim at an object that is the width of the front sight(at a distance of course)? Or just a bare wall? I will try all three of these when I wake up tomorrow today, and see what works. But Im wondering what I "should" be using.


Thanks again for all your help.


Even better yet...do you own a laser bore sighter, laser sight, or laser grips for the gun? you can REALLY see movement with any of those
Link Posted: 7/9/2008 1:00:13 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/9/2008 3:36:37 PM EDT
See above.

Try dry firing with a quarter on top of the slide. Quarter shouldn't move. Dry fire, dry fire and dry fire some more.

Like others have said pad of finger not the distal joint. Distal joint is for DA revolvers shooting DA.

Practice the slowest, smoothest trigger pull you can manage. The trigger break should be a complete surprise.

Start at 7 yards, then 10, then 15, then 20, and then 25. Don't increase distance until you can keep 25 shots in a fist size group.
Link Posted: 7/15/2008 12:26:14 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/15/2008 12:40:23 AM EDT by McGap]

Originally Posted By ChuckBronson:
Im brand new to shooting handguns, and I suck. Ive been to the range 4 times with my new XD9. Im finally getting decent groupings, but they are off to the left about three inches (at 20 yrds). I shoot right handed, and I think this may be caused by a slight twist in the gun when I pull the trigger. I shoot my rifles with the 1st pad of my index finger, but Ive been told to shoot hand guns with the first crease. I havent had a chance to try both ways yet.... just happy Im finally getting groupings.


Depending upon your training purposes and applications, the distal joint suggestion may be valid. I've been a fan of Mas Ayoob's techniques since I left the police academy back in 1985, although I don't accept that anyone is a definitive, singular authority on combat handgunnery, his teachings have benefited me greatly over the years. The attached link is a good article on what you seek - special attention to his "crush grip" and distal joint trigger finger placement (which I find particularly applicable considering my applications and weapons - Glocks and XD's).

Ayoob Link
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 7:11:55 PM EDT
DRY FIRE.
You should dry fire your weapon as many or more times rounds actually go through it..

CXS
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 9:02:28 AM EDT
when dry firing try putting a spent .223 case on top of the slide near the front sight. work on trigger squeeze until it doesn't move when you pull the trigger
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 9:40:09 AM EDT

Originally Posted By rlarge10:
when dry firing try putting a spent .223 case on top of the slide near the front sight. work on trigger squeeze until it doesn't move when you pull the trigger


+1 to this. Use any shell casing really.
then try it with the casing ON your front sight post..

CXS
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 9:42:25 AM EDT
Like everyone else has said, keep dryfiring. Spend some of the time, aiming at something about the width of the front sight. Spend some time pointing towards a blank wall. Watch the front sight. Having nothing in the background makes this easier.

The added benefit of dryfiring is that it can help smooth out your trigger. The XD triggers get smoother over time. Dryfire whenever you have the chance, and always check to make sure you are unloaded.

Link Posted: 7/22/2008 2:51:56 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/22/2008 2:54:31 PM EDT by radioshooter]
Seeing three inche groups centered left at 20 yards is pretty good with a box stock service pistol. I would get a sight adjuster and barely move the rear sight to the right a smidgen. It only takes a small amount on the rear sight to get a bunch at 20 yards.

RS
Top Top