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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/8/2010 3:18:27 PM EDT
Is better than a good day at work!

Regardless, I had a bad day at the range. I took my new S&W 442 out for the first time. I've been shooting semi's for years, but I've never shot a revolver before, so I was excited to see how they handle. However, at a range of 15 to 20 feet, I did terrible! I put 70 rounds through her and only hit paper, not even necessarily kill shots, 56 times. I know it's been a while since I've been shooting, but damn, I thought I could do better than that. Is the 442 just less accurate than the semi's I'm used to, or do I need a whole Hell of a lot more practice? Thanks guys!
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 3:19:54 PM EDT
Originally Posted By erichmess_:
Is better than a good day at work!

Regardless, I had a bad day at the range. I took my new S&W 442 out for the first time. I've been shooting semi's for years, but I've never shot a revolver before, so I was excited to see how they handle. However, at a range of 15 to 20 feet, I did terrible! I put 70 rounds through her and only hit paper, not even necessarily kill shots, 56 times. I know it's been a while since I've been shooting, but damn, I thought I could do better than that. Is the 442 just less accurate than the semi's I'm used to, or do I need a whole Hell of a lot more practice? Thanks guys!



The 38 snubbies just need more practice time.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 3:22:20 PM EDT
Originally Posted By PalmettoSharpshooter:
Originally Posted By erichmess_:
Is better than a good day at work!

Regardless, I had a bad day at the range. I took my new S&W 442 out for the first time. I've been shooting semi's for years, but I've never shot a revolver before, so I was excited to see how they handle. However, at a range of 15 to 20 feet, I did terrible! I put 70 rounds through her and only hit paper, not even necessarily kill shots, 56 times. I know it's been a while since I've been shooting, but damn, I thought I could do better than that. Is the 442 just less accurate than the semi's I'm used to, or do I need a whole Hell of a lot more practice? Thanks guys!



The 38 snubbies just need more practice time.


Agreed! The shorter sight radius takes some getting used to.....

Good luck!
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 3:22:21 PM EDT
Sounds about like my first outing with my 642. They do require a lot of practice.

By no means am I an ace shot with the 642, but I can hit a head-sized target at 7 yds all day long, and that's good enough for me.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 3:28:08 PM EDT
I shoot a model 38 bodyguard. I am able to hit the black on a bullseye target at fifty yards. It just takes practice. The difficulties are two main things. First, the sight
radius is really short. Second, you are limited to a double action
pull.

The revolver is the perfect gun for ball and dummy drills. Start there. This will diagnose a flinch if you have one. After that, shoot light target loads and wear plugs and muffs. People flinch if it hurts and if it's loud.

Report back after you try these drills.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 3:42:50 PM EDT
The gun is easily accurate enough to hit a man, or something even smaller, at 100 yards. J frames aren't easy to shoot well, especially DAO models. If you're not used to shooting a DA revolver, it will take a lot of practice to be proficient with one.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 4:12:39 PM EDT
I got better as I practiced. Then I got laser grips. Huge difference.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 4:50:12 PM EDT
The J-frame is not easy to shoot well, especially w/o a laser. It can be done, but IMO, it will never be a fun range gun. Short sight radius, long, heavy as hell triggers, and stout recoil are just not a combination compatible with small groups. Great BUGs, but I would hesitate to use a J-frame as my EDC. YMMV.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 5:02:26 PM EDT
For accuracy, not combat accuracy, learn to stage the pull.
One change you'll need to make is to use the first joint of your trigger finger, not the pad like you've been taught for semi-autos.
Second, dry-fire practice pulling the trigger slowly until the cylinder locks just before the "hammer" falls.
Then, line up the sights on target and complete the pull.

This is NOT what you want to do for SD use, obviously, but it will help learn how to use the sights on these things.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 5:21:38 PM EDT
I carry a J frame about 80% of the time. For me I found that pulling quickly straight through the trigger gave me my best groups. Like anything else it takes practice. You will get better.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 6:07:54 PM EDT
Thanks everyone! I'll be sure to try out some of these techniques next time I go out.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 7:27:27 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2010 7:02:03 PM EDT by payne540]
I too have had my pride thumped by my revolvers. I can shoot a Glock well enough, and my first 5 years of handgunning was Glock exclusive. Once I had obtained some revolvers, I found that I couldn't shoot the things worth a damn! I have a Taurus 85 and 3 S&Ws, and I'm absolutely terrible with all of them. I can put 6 rounds in 3 inches at 20 yards with the S&W Model 14s if I shoot single action with my hands supported on the bench. However, I can barely keep the rounds on the paper shooting double action off hand, which is aggravating. I have less than 500 rounds total through all 4 of my revolvers though, (compared to about 6,000 rounds through my Glocks), and I don't rely on my revolvers for self defense, so I'm not too worried yet...

As others have said, enough practice will allow you to use your new revolver to its potential. Have fun!
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:36:36 AM EDT
Originally Posted By machinisttx:
The gun is easily accurate enough to hit a man, or something even smaller, at 100 yards. J frames aren't easy to shoot well, especially DAO models. If you're not used to shooting a DA revolver, it will take a lot of practice to be proficient with one.


This. I shoot USPSA revolver, ICORE and steel with wheel guns and I still have to really concentrate to get good results with the 360.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:44:32 AM EDT
Like a lot of folks have mentioned the snubbies are tough to master due to the short sight radius and very basic sight pictures, and while I can shoot my Tarsus 85 well enough with the iron sights the laser grips made all the difference for consistent tight groups for me.
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 5:31:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/11/2010 5:32:59 PM EDT by Hawgleg44]
I grew up shooting S&W revolvers, and didn't start shooting autos until I was well into my 20's.

You have to master the trigger. That's why I think everyone should start shooting handguns with a DA revolver. Once you master that trigger, you'll find it easy to master every other trigger out there.

Do a lot of dry fire practice at home. Unload, check that you are unloaded, and check again. Keep your ammo in another room. Then, pick a spot on the wall, put a target on the wall, etc. I've read of some people looking in a mirror when they practice. Not a good thing, since you'll end up looking at your reflection instead of the sights like you should be.

Start out slowly. Line up your sights and use a slow, consistant trigger pull. Don't press the trigger any faster than you can keep your sights aligned on the target, completely through the press and break. Do this every day for about 20 minutes for weeks. You'll find that after a few days, you may be able to speed up a little, maybe not. Either way, shooting faster than you can hit your target is a waste of ammo anyway, so why build muscle memory dry firing faster than you can accurately shoot, right?

When you go to the range the next time, shoot the same way you have been dry firing. Slowly and accurately. Speed with a revolver is built up over years, not a few range sessions. Concentrate on accuracy. Once you do that, speed will come easy.

If you try to speed up too quickly, you'll find your accuracy suffers. Back off, slow down, and get back to basics. I wouldn't recommend speeding up until you have months of practice under your belt.

Dedicate the time for quality training and practice, and let us know how it works out.
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 5:37:52 PM EDT
You need more practise.

Brl length has very little to do with mechanical accuracy.

Additionally your fixed sights are only regulated for one specific weight bullet and one specific velocity.

So start with a variety of ammo. Put your target at the 7 yard line and fire a 5-shot group with each ammo type. Whichever one shoots closest to point of aim is what you want to stock up on.

For plinking use 148Gn Wadcutters or 158Gn LRN.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 3:05:44 PM EDT
Originally Posted By MoonDancer:
For accuracy, not combat accuracy, learn to stage the pull.
One change you'll need to make is to use the first joint of your trigger finger, not the pad like you've been taught for semi-autos.
Second, dry-fire practice pulling the trigger slowly until the cylinder locks just before the "hammer" falls.
Then, line up the sights on target and complete the pull.

This is NOT what you want to do for SD use, obviously, but it will help learn how to use the sights on these things.


Why is using the joint different for the revolver vs the semi?
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 4:13:30 PM EDT
Originally Posted By erichmess_:
Originally Posted By MoonDancer:
For accuracy, not combat accuracy, learn to stage the pull.
One change you'll need to make is to use the first joint of your trigger finger, not the pad like you've been taught for semi-autos.
Second, dry-fire practice pulling the trigger slowly until the cylinder locks just before the "hammer" falls.
Then, line up the sights on target and complete the pull.

This is NOT what you want to do for SD use, obviously, but it will help learn how to use the sights on these things.


Why is using the joint different for the revolver vs the semi?


All the DA semi's I've handled have had lighter pulls than the average DA revolver(a tuned DA revolver on the other hand, will put an autoloader to shame). Moving up to the first joint of the finger allows for more leverage if you're shooting DA.
Link Posted: 9/13/2010 7:04:45 PM EDT
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